Lurie College of Education Repopulation Information | May 10, 2021

Dear Lurie College Students,

First of all, we want to acknowledge your amazing accomplishments this year of online instruction. We have heard so many stories about your commitment and perseverance.

As SJSU Provost Del Casino recently described in an email on Thursday, May 6, with the subject line “Fall 2021 Course Schedule is Live,” we are planning carefully for the Fall 2021 semester and expect to have more updates as we finalize those plans.

We’re sending you this message to share some details for the Lurie College of Education and our programs.

  • Each of our programs is planning for every student to have some in-person components in their Fall courses. So, we want you to expect to have at least some of your courses with in-person components at SJSU. The schedule will provide details on each course’s mode of instruction.
  • We recognize that some of you may have special circumstances that will make it impossible to attend classes in person. If you are in this situation, please fill out this Google form as soon as possible.
  • Field experiences (including preschool lab, clinic, practicum) are planned to be in person and are viewable on the schedule now.
  • Advisors in our Student Success Center (SSC) are working now and throughout the summer to provide support with scheduling, questions about course modality, and helping to prepare students for a return to campus. Please reach out to them if you have specific questions or concerns.
  • We are planning to have space available for students in Sweeney Hall where you can access wifi and attend online classes (if, for example, one of your classes meets on campus but the next one meets remotely and you will not have enough time to return home).
  • We’re putting together a Reorientation to familiarize students with the new norms to ensure safety on campus in the Fall. We’ll be developing a web page that will be updated regularly and will share the website as soon as it’s ready.
  • Right now, you can get the latest information on SJSU’s plans for Fall on these websites: SJSU Adapt Plan and Spartan Community Promise
  • For Child and Adolescent Development (ChAD) students: You may notice that the CHAD ‘hybrid’ courses are set up with a regular twice a week meeting schedule to allow faculty the most flexibility to maximize in-person meetings. The goal is that these classes will meet in-person twice a week, so students registering for these classes should plan for that. We will provide updates on the schedules for these courses if the plans for fall require any changes. Students who are unable to meet in person for both times listed for a course should enroll in an online only section.

Again, please reach out if you have any questions or concerns.

Janene Perez
Lurie College Student Success Center Director
janene.perez@sjsu.edu

Marcos Pizarro
Lurie College Associate Dean
marcos.pizarro@sjsu.edu

Attend Our Spring 2021 Lurie College Learning Showcase

SJSU Lurie College of Education Learning Showcase

Our semi-annual SJSU Lurie College of Education Learning Showcase highlights our undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students while they’re on their journeys to becoming transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders under our college’s four priority areas: community-engaged, culturally sustaining, holistic, and interdisciplinary.

Our Spring 2021 Learning Showcase will take place virtually on Friday, May 14, from 4-6:30pm and will include presentations and panels focused on topics such as:

  • Action Research/Intervention for Students with Disabilities
  • Communication, Covid & Complications
  • Co-Teaching/Inclusion Research
  • Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Perspectives in Research
  • Emancipatory Education Now
  • Perceptions and Special Education
  • Systematic Review of Interventions and Supports for Students with Disabilities
  • Understanding the Importance of Intentional Breaks to Relax, Reflect, and Refocus
  • What it’s like to be a ChAD Student Ambassador

To learn more about each of the sessions and RSVP to attend, visit sjsu.edu/education/showcase.

Lurie College Faculty Receives SJSU Early Career Investigator Award

Congratulations to Child and Adolescent Development faculty Ellen Middaugh, who was selected by the SJSU Office of Research and Innovation to receive the Early Career Investigator Award!  Dr. Middaugh and her team of Student Research Assistants – George Franco, Kristen Huey, and Kristina Smith – research how youth utilize social media platforms to empower their voices, promote community and encourage civic engagement.  Watch the recognition video below that was shown during the SJSU Celebration of Research.

Apply for Lurie College Scholarships for the 2021-2022 Academic Year

Thanks to generous monetary support from alumni and friends, each year Lurie College is able to award current and incoming undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students with scholarships based on their academic, personal, and professional affiliations, accomplishments, and aspirations. Current and newly-admitted students can apply for these awards through the SJSU scholarship application portal until Saturday, May 1, for the 2021-2022 academic year.  Learn more and watch the recording of our scholarships workshop at sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid.

2020-2021 Lurie College Scholarship Summary

  • Number of students awarded: 110
  • Amount of scholarship funds awarded: $265,400
  • Median award amount: $1000; Average award amount: $2413

Watch Episode 6 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Abby leads a dialogue around stereotype threat. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What resonated with you about this TEDTalk? Did anything surprise you or challenge your previous ways of thinking?
  • We started today’s sharing some of our layers of our identity. As you consumed Adichie’s talk on Single Stories, what single stories were coming up for you about yourself?
  • In the TEDTalk, Adichie references an Igbo word: nkali (9:37) – “to be greater than another.” She goes on to say that single stories exist because there are those who have the power to write the definitive stories of a person or group of people. Our media have the power of telling the story of people. What single stories do you see in the media?
  • Why is it important to understand the single stories of ourselves and others? Why is it important for those in education to identify when single stories exist?
  • We also read an article on some ways to address stereotype threat in the classroom. What are your thoughts on those suggestions? Is it enough? What else could be done?

after watching “The danger of a single story” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and reading “How Teachers Can Reduce Stereotype Threat in the Classroom.”

This episode’s call to action: How are you purposefully providing opportunities for those you influence and who influence you to give you a more complete story of who they are? Let’s all build bridges across differences one story at a time.

All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now.  Join us for our final episode on Friday, May 14, at 5:15pm at the Lurie College Learning Showcase.  More information coming soon at sjsu.edu/education/showcase.

Attend Our Lurie College Dean’s Forum

Hello Lurie College Students!

We hope you’ll be able to join us for this student open forum. We’ll be joined by Dean Heather Lattimer, Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro, and Student Success Center Director Janene Perez. This will be a great opportunity to have any questions or concerns you have addressed.

The Zoom link for this forum was emailed as a Google Calendar invite to your SJSU email accounts.  If you won’t be able to attend this event, there will be others later in the semester. Please see below for the full schedule. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to luriecollege@sjsu.edu.

  • Thursday, February 25: 11:45am – 12:45pm
  • Thursday, March 18: 10:45 – 11:45am
  • Wednesday, April 28: 3:00 – 4:00pm
  • Wednesday, May 5: 2:00 – 3:00pm

SJSU Lurie College of Education Dean's Forum 4.28.21

Statement from Lurie College Dean Heather Lattimer Following Verdict of Derek Chauvin Trial

Dear Lurie College Students —

Tuesday’s guilty verdict in Derek Chauvin’s trial provided a small measure of accountability.  It offered momentary relief because it affirmed what we had clearly seen with our own eyes but were afraid the justice system would deny – that George Floyd was murdered when a police officer pressed his knee into Mr. Floyd’s neck for 9 minutes and 29 seconds, depriving him of the oxygen needed to survive.

But the verdict in this one case – while significant – did not bring true justice.  The very fact that it was so uncertain what the verdict would be, despite overwhelming evidence and even testimony from other police officers, demonstrates the depth of racism, white supremacy, and structural injustice in our society.   And then the day brought news of yet another police shooting of a Black teenager, Ma’Khia Bryant, in Columbus, Ohio.

In our roles as current or aspiring educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders, we need to call out racism in all its forms and we need to acknowledge the pain, anger, frustration, and exhaustion that so many in our community are experiencing in this moment.

Our Lurie College faculty and staff are here for you.  If you want to connect, share your experiences, or talk through how to support children and families in your placement sites please reach out to your professors and advisors.  You are also encouraged to connect with the team in the Student Success Center; they are a fantastic resource and can point you toward additional campus supports if needed.  You’ll find curated collections of helpful resources on our Lurie College Antiracism and Racial Justice Resources webpage as well as on the Learning for Justice and Education Minnesota websites.

Students are invited to join Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro and me at our two upcoming Open Forums on Wednesday, April 28, 3-4pm and Wednesday, May 5, 2-3pm. The information to join each of these forums via Zoom should be available in your SJSU Google Calendars.  These forums provide space to be in community together and invite dialogue on how we can better fulfill our Lurie College strategic plan and commitments to racial justice.

As we near the end of a tumultuous and challenging semester, please be generous and patient with one another and yourselves. Reach out and ask for help if needed.  Check in on your colleagues. Practice self care and step away from the Zoom screen when you can.  We see you, we care about you, we are committed to your success.

In solidarity – Heather

Lurie College Recognizes Dean’s Scholars

Each spring, SJSU undergraduate students who have earned a 3.65-3.99 grade point average during the previous fall or spring semesters are recognized as Dean’s Scholars for their academic achievements. This semester, we recognized 338 Dean’s Scholars from the Spring 2020 and Fall 2020 semester – an increase of 50% from the previous year!

  • 0:00 – Remarks from Dean Heather Lattimer and Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro
  • 6:03 – Remarks from Child & Adolescent Development Chair Dr. Emily Slusser
  • 8:54 – Remarks from Communicative Disorders & Sciences Chair Dr. Nidhi Mahendra
  • 11:41 – Recognition of scholars last names A-E
  • 16:43 – Recognition of scholars last names F-J
  • 20:49 – Recognition of scholars last names K-O
  • 26:03 – Recognition of scholars last names P-T
  • 32:11 – Recognition of scholars last names U-Z

Strategic Plan Spotlight: The Promise Group

At the SJSU Lurie College of Education, we prepare transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders. We do this through an emancipatory approach across our teaching, scholarship, and service.  The Lurie College Promise Group was established to create opportunities for first-generation students and those who are part of the SJSU Spartan Scholars, Guardian Scholars, or Educational Opportunity Program to participate in a year-long personal, academic, and professional development experience.  Lurie College staff member Ana Paz-Rangel recently interviewed staff member Sarah Arreola, who served as a mentor for Child and Adolescent Development student Trini Ruiz.  Read the full interview below.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Promise Group Trini Ruiz Sarah Arreola

Can you tell share some of your mentorship experience through the Promise Group?

When Donna reached out to me, I was excited and nervous at the same time. Nervous because I hoped I’d meet the Student Success Center’s expectations. The exciting part was mentoring a Lurie College student and being able to support them.

My mentee’s name was Trini. She was delightful, had a certain energy, and I saw that she was motivated. Each time we met, I started with the question “what can I help you with today?” One day, Trini was nervous to take the CBEST and to address that, we applied together.

We also discussed Trini’s long-term goals. One time, Trini discovered she needed to take an additional class, but didn’t have room in her schedule or the budget for a class at SJSU. We ultimately found a solution by exploring similar courses at Evergreen College. Trini wasn’t aware of the process for enrolling at a community college so I assisted her through this process.

Continue Reading…

Join us for Episode 6 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Ana leads a dialogue around antiracist education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What was your initial reaction to the articles and the video? Did anything surprise you?
  • How would you define antiracist education?
  • What do you think are antiracist strategies for teachers? Do you agree with the ones presented in the video?
  • The first article discusses the need to go beyond ethnic studies courses and include anti-racist education in all subjects. How do you think schools and districts can accomplish this?
  • The second article discusses Trump-era policies that sought to prevent schools from teaching critical race theory and federally funded agencies from offering diversity training. While this is no longer an issue under the Biden administration, should we be concerned about such things happening in the future? What do you think is the likelihood of a future administration trying to enact such policies, and is there anything we can do about it in the meantime?
  • Can you identify any challenges to implementing strategies for antiracist education? How can we overcome these?
  • Why is antiracist education important to you? Why do you think it’s important that schools commit to antiracist education?

after reading the articles “California schools, universities condemn anti-Asian attacks, offer support to students” by Carolyn Jones and Ashley Smith and “Diversity Work, Interrupted” by Colleen Flaherty and watching the video “6 Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” by Edutopia.

This episode’s call to action: Watch the video “Six Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” and try to implement at least one of those strategies in your classroom. Additionally, since many of these ideas are applicable beyond the classroom, think about what it would look like for you to implement such practices in your daily life. What can you do to combat racism in your community?

Additional Antiracism and Racial Justice resources are available on the Lurie College website at sjsu.edu/education/community/antiracism.  All of the recordings for this series are available at http://sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Lurie College Launches New Undergraduate Minor

Our new SJSU undergraduate Minor in Transformative Leadership is an interdisciplinary approach to leadership development through engagement with anti-racist pedagogies and practices. By building a foundation and framework for developing an intersectional lens throughout this program, students develop their leadership goals around becoming transformative agents of change in their communities through meaningful, culturally affirming, and sustaining practices.

Located in the SJSU Lurie College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership, the Transformative Leadership Minor prepares SJSU undergraduate students of all academic backgrounds to enact meaningful change in local, state, and national settings. To learn more and RSVP for our upcoming info session on Tuesday, April 20, at 12pm, visit sjsu.edu/edleadership/academics/undergraduate-minor

Attend the Lurie College Early Childhood Career Panel

Join our SJSU Early Childhood Institute and the Lurie College Student Success Center on Tuesday, April 13, 3-4:30pm to learn about a variety of career paths involving young children age 5 years and younger from our Early Childhood Career panel:

  • Lauren Hawkins; Recreation Program Specialist; Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Services, City of San Jose
  • Ninveh Khoshabian; Program Director; Catalyst Kids
  • Pamela Campos; Child Care Technical Assistance Coordinator, Build Up for San Mateo County’s Children
  • Kate Rozzi; Talent and Staffing Manager, Ability Path
  • Roxanna Croteau; Early Childhood Mental Health Consultant, Kidango, Inc.

Register here to receive the Zoom Link.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Early Childhood Institute ECI Spring 2021 Career Panel

#IBelongAtLurieCollege | Alejandra Romo

What provides you with a sense of belonging at Lurie College?  Is it your drive to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader?  A faculty member, advisor, your friends or student groups?  The events and culture?  Share with us on Instagram by tagging @sjsulurie and using the hashtag #IBelongAtLurieCollege in your caption or email us at brian.cheungdooley@sjsu.edu so we can share uplifting stories from our community.  Learn about Alejandra Romo, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences undergraduate student, and what provides her with a sense of belonging!

“Lurie College has been a great place to call home here at SJSU because of the strong sense of community I always feel around me.  It has opened many doors to many opportunities, connections, and resources and for that I am extremely grateful.  I have broken out of my shell and owe that to my program and Lurie College for making every student feel like they’re capable of great things.”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Communicative Disorders & Sciences Student Alejandra Romo

Apply for Lurie College Grants

Student Research Awards | Apply by Mon., Apr. 12

  • The Lurie College of Education is pleased to offer up to three student-research awards for the 2021-2022 academic year to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project.  These awards are designed to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major.  Students can receive an award of $2,000 per semester and $4,000 a year.  Apply for a research award via this Google form.

Student Research Supplies Grant | Apply by Mon., May 3

  • Undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students are eligible to apply for up to one $200 grant per fiscal year (July 1 – May 31) towards expenses for research supplies to conduct their academic research.  A limited amount of funding is available.  To apply for a Lurie College Student Research Supplies Grant, please download and complete this brief form (PDF).

Strategic Plan Grant | Apply by Mon., Mar. 29

  • We are pleased to announce the request for proposals (RFP) for our 2021-22 Lurie College Strategic Plan Seed Grants.  Lurie College’s Strategic Plan Seed Grants are designed to advance the priorities articulated in our strategic plan.   All faculty, staff, and students in our Lurie College community are eligible to apply for seed grant funding.  Initial draft proposals are due Monday, March 29.  Submit your grant proposal by completing this Google form.  If you have questions about these grant opportunities, please email lurie-steering-group@sjsu.edu.

Hardship Grant

  • Lurie College has a limited amount of grant funds available to support its students who have experienced an unforeseen financial hardship that will prevent them from continuing their enrollment at Lurie College and SJSU.  If you are a Lurie College undergraduate, graduate, credential, or doctoral student who has experienced this type of hardship, please complete this brief Google form so that a Lurie College advisor can contact you to discuss this option as well as other possible campus resources.

#IBelongAtLurieCollege | Dani Umana

What provides you with a sense of belonging at Lurie College?  Is it your drive to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader?  A faculty member, advisor, your friends or student groups?  The events and culture?  Share with us on Instagram by tagging @sjsulurie and using the hashtag #IBelongAtLurieCollege in your caption or email us at brian.cheungdooley@sjsu.edu so we can share uplifting stories from our community.  Learn about Dani Umana, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences undergraduate student, and what provides her with a sense of belonging!

“Although this school year has been entirely remote, I have had amazing experiences as a Spartan transfer student.  The caring, supportive professors and friends I’ve met through school have made a lasting impact on my personal & academic development.  Signing up for the Chicanx/Latinx Student Leadership Retreat and the Lurie College Learning Showcase have helped me get to know several faculty members & students outside of class and fostered a sense of community as well.”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Communicative Disorders & Sciences Student Dani Umana

Save the Date: Spring 2021 SJSU Lurie College Graduation Celebration

SJSU Lurie College of Education Graduation Celebration Spring 2021

We’re excited to recognize and celebrate our next class of SJSU Lurie College of Education alumni during our Spring 2021 Graduation Celebration, which will take place on Friday, May 28, at 4pm PDT!  Graduates will receive additional information via email regarding how to participate.  Family and friends of our graduates are invited to watch the ceremony live on our Lurie College YouTube channel at bit.ly/lurie-youtube.

Student Spotlights: Alaysia Palmer, Paulina Medina, and Vinson Vũ

The SJSU Lurie College of Education provides research awards to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major. Learn about our recent student research award recipients – Alaysia Palmer (Child & Adolescent Development), Paulina Medina (Communicative Disorders & Sciences), and Vinson Vũ (Child & Adolescent Development) as they discuss their experiences with their research projects, faculty mentors, and more.

  • 0:00 – Meet Alaysia, Paulina, and Vinson
  • 0:29 – Description of research projects
  • 4:27 – Relationships with faculty mentors
  • 7:05 – How the research award experiences have shaped them
  • 10:13 – Advice for future applicants

The Lurie College of Education is pleased to offer up to three student-research awards for the 2021-2022 academic year to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project.  These awards are designed to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major.  Students can receive an award of $2,000 per semester and $4,000 a year.  Apply for a research award by Monday, April 12, at sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid.

SJSU President Papazian Shines a Spotlight on Lurie College Emancipatory Education Initiative

This story, “Emancipatory learning approach helping students ‘reap the full benefit of an empowering education,'” was originally published on SJSU President Papazian’s blog.

Recently I had the opportunity to offer welcome remarks at the kickoff event for our Lurie College of Education’s new Emancipatory Education Speaker Series, which focuses on a “post-COVID-19 education system.” What an important and timely initiative!

After listening to the first speaker, Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings, I quickly realized how well-aligned this series is with San José State values, our academic goals and our Transformation 2030 strategic plan. Emancipatory education, in fact, is an approach that begins to put into practice some of the general education changes that we at SJSU have been discussing these past few years.

Read more…

Watch Episode 4 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Vaishnavi leads a dialogue around inequality and access in education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are some examples of initiatives at the classroom, school/university, state, or federal level that have been effective at creating a more equitable education for low income students? What are some examples of ineffective initiatives or missed opportunities?
  • How do you think race plays a factor in schooling in low income communities? The videos provided some examples. Did anything stand out to you?
  • In the Crash Course video, we saw that higher income parents are more likely to spend time with their children reading books and strengthening their cognitive skills. These higher income children enter school with more knowledge compared to a child from a lower income household. How can we support these young children early on to ensure that they are successful throughout their school journey?
  • FAFSA is a great way for students to get grants and money. However, do you think FAFSA is a simple process for low income families? Why or why not?
  • After reading the article on the factors that count against low income students in the college admissions process, what were your thoughts/initial reactions? Do you think that students that attend schools with extremely low budgets will always have no hope towards attending good colleges since they don’t have impressive extracurriculars or classes?

after reading the article “5 Ways Elite-College Admissions Shut Out Poor Kids” by Anya Kamenetz and watching the videos “Higher Education for Low-Income Students,” and “Schools & Social Inequality: Crash Course Sociology #41.”

This episode’s call to action: After our discussion, think about how San Jose State University aids low income students to continue attending classes. Find one resource that SJSU provides to support these students. Do you think this resource is helpful? Is there a resource that you would recommend to SJSU instead?

Join us live for our episode 5 on Friday, April 9, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Apply by May 1 for SJSU and Lurie College Scholarships for 2021-2022

The SJSU Spartan Scholarship Application portal is now open to those who will be enrolled during the 2021-2022 academic year!  Applications for SJSU Lurie College of Education scholarships are due by Saturday, May 1, 2021.  Visit sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid to access the link to the SJSU Spartan Scholarship Application portal, watch the recording of our recent scholarship application workshop, and learn about other Lurie College financial aid opportunities.

Reflections from Dean Heather Lattimer on 1 Year Anniversary of COVID-19 Shelter-in-Place

Watch this video to listen to SJSU Lurie College of Education Dean Heather Lattimer share some reflections on the 1 year anniversary of when Santa Clara County and SJSU first transitioned to a shelter-in-place in response to COVID-19 and share some updates and optimism about returning to SJSU to teach, learn, and work in person as we look ahead to the Fall 2021 semester.  The full text of Dean Lattimer’s remarks is available below.

Dear Lurie College students, faculty, and staff,

It has been one year since we left campus due to COVID-19.  When we said goodbye a year ago, I suggested that staff and faculty pack up what they would need for a couple of months – just to be on the safe side. It has obviously been a lot more than a couple of months.

As I reflect back on the past year, I am both heartbroken and grateful.  I am heartbroken by the incalculable losses that we’ve witnessed – Friends and family members lost to COVID and other illnesses.  Job losses and financial insecurities.  Exacerbated inequality.  Anti-Asian, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant violence targeted toward our BIPOC communities. Isolation and mental health challenges. Wildfire-related disruptions and displacements.  Missing celebrations and curtailed rites of passage.  These losses are real and significant and we grieve them with you.

But I am grateful too – I have been so deeply impressed by the resilience and commitment of our Lurie College community. During the past year, we’ve witnessed students, faculty, staff, and community partners coming together to support and care for one another.  There have been real accomplishments that would have been significant in normal times and are monumental in COVID times.  For example – this year 330 undergraduate students in Lurie College have earned the dean’s scholar award, a 50% increase over the previous year. Enrollment in our credential programs grew by 40%.  We’ve seen an increase in faculty and staff recognition through awards, grants, and publications. We’ve deepened partnerships and outreach and provided direct support to school districts, community-based organizations, and clinics.

Each and every day I wake up humbled and grateful to be part of a college community that consistently demonstrates care and kindness toward one another and a passionate commitment to our larger mission to prepare and sustain transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders. Thank you!

One year later we are seeing light at the end of the tunnel.  If vaccination continues to progress and infection rates continue to decline, we anticipate that we will be in a very different context by August.  We are planning that most classes will be able to have face-to-face meetings for the Fall 2021 semester.  We are anticipating that most field experiences will be in person at our partner sites.  College offices will be reopening and I anticipate being back on campus in Sweeney Hall full time by August 1.

We recognize that some people may have health concerns that prevent them from returning to campus and will need accommodation.  We also recognize that there have been some real benefits to the online environment and are exploring how effective use of the virtual space can support student learning and strengthen access moving forward.  However, I know that many of us are eager to be able to see people face to face and be in community together.  As you look to the year ahead, please anticipate that we will be returning to campus.  There will likely be the continued need for masking and some social distancing, but it will be so good to be able to see people in person!

Of course, the pandemic isn’t over and I encourage you to continue to wear masks, socially distance, and wash hands.  When you are able, please go get the vaccine.  Santa Clara County is now in phase 1 b of vaccine distribution, with people working in education and childcare eligible to be vaccinated.  This includes all SJSU employees and all Lurie College students who currently are or anticipate returning to school or clinic sites in Spring 2021.  I received my first dose at Levi Stadium last weekend.  The health care workers and volunteers at the stadium were fantastic.  And it felt really good knowing that it represented a huge step toward getting us all back to campus.

Thank you again for all that you do to contribute to the health, well-being, and success of our community.  Lurie College is a family of dedicated, talented, smart, creative, passionate, and capable individuals. Together we have not just survived this past year, we have thrived.  Thank you for being part of our family.  I look forward to seeing you back on campus next semester!

With gratitude —

Heather

Watch Episode 3 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Aminah leads a dialogue around high-stakes standardized testing. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are your initial reactions to this reading? Do you have any examples or questions that came to mind after the reading?
  • How do you think standardized testing practices racial inequality and who do you think it affects the most?
  • How can we support students who are affected by the inequalities of standardized testing, when these practices are still in place?
  • What are possible standardized testing alternatives you would implement/want to see implemented in schools that would achieve racial equality and be accurate measures of a students knowledge? Or is this something we even need to measure?

after reading the article “Meritocracy 2.0: High-Stakes, Standardized Testing as a Racial Project of Neoliberal Multiculturalism” by Wayne Au prior to the episode.

This episode’s call to action: Raise our awareness of how biases in standardized testing affect our students in order to provide support for students who are affected by these biases and find ways to help them succeed.

Join us live for our episode 4 on Friday, March 19, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Strategic Plan Spotlight: Early Childhood Connections

At the SJSU Lurie College of Education, we prepare transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders through an emancipatory approach across our teaching, scholarship, and service and with a focus on being community-engaged, culturally sustaining, interdisciplinary, and holistic.  Learn more about what this looks like in practice from Child & Adolescent Development faculty Maria Fusaro as she discusses our Early Childhood Institute and Early Childhood Connections initiative below.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Early Childhood Institute Emily Slusser Andrea Golloher Maria Fusaro

As a faculty member in ChAD (Child and Adolescent Development), I’m privileged to work with many dedicated students as part of their educational journey.  Students bring rich insights from their experiences in their own families and from work and volunteer experiences in their communities to my classes on infant/toddler development.

While classes are a critical part of the college experience, college is also a prime time to make personal and professional connections, broaden our horizons, dream bigger dreams, and persist through new struggles.  When I began my journey as a first-generation college student, I had optimistic but vague perspectives about what higher education was all about.  While I cannot fully appreciate what it means to be a college student in the era of COVID, I do recognize the value of having intentional opportunities for connection and dialogue, especially to recover some of the informal connection that we’ve lost to this virus.

In 2019, I worked with my colleagues Emily Slusser and Andrea Golloher, from ChAD and Special Education, to launch the Early Childhood Institute (ECI).  At its heart, ECI is a hub for all things early childhood on campus, including research, training, and advocacy.  We create opportunities for dialogue to better meet the needs of young children and their families in ways that connect research and practice.

As part of our work, and with the support of Lurie College Strategic Plan funding, ECI established a program called Early Childhood Connections (ECC). ECC focuses on building community and supporting the professional growth of BA and MA students and recent alumni across disciplines in pursuit of careers involving young children.  During each of our ongoing sessions, presenters from SJSU and ECI’s community partners are invited to lead discussions on a range of topics.  We’ve learned about the landscape for infant/toddler intervention in California, strategies for engaging with diverse families, and ways in which early childhood teachers (generalists) can work hand in hand with early childhood specialists. We are particularly proud that some of our presenters are SJSU alum, returning to share their wisdom with the next generation of early childhood professionals.

ECC only exists because of our participants and their voices are critical for shaping the program.  A huge shoutout goes to Thao Ngyuen (ChAD BA, 2021), who has served as our dedicated student coordinator throughout our first year of program design and implementation.  Our team, which also includes Isabel Vallejo and Donna Bee-Gates, developed the bones of the program, and participants have weighed in on our meeting themes and ways to stay connected outside of our planned meetings.  ECC is one part of each of their unique SJSU experiences, but it is one that we hope will carry on long into the future, as they continue their professional journey and stay connected to ECI along the way.

Join us for Episode 3 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Victor leads a dialogue around decolonization in education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What is your initial reaction towards the reading? Do you have an example or question that came to mind after reading the article?
  • How would you describe the topic of decolonization to a student?
  • What would efforts to decolonize education look like?

after reading the article “Decolonization and Education: Locating Pedagogy and Self at the Interstices in Global Times” by Nina Asher prior to the episode.

This episode’s call to action: The effects of colonization can be experienced by the narrow thinking developed in the human mind. As we return to society, we must be more mindful in how we interact with each other. Decolonization begins with decolonizing one’s own mind.

Join us live for our episode 3 on Friday, March 12, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Reflections on the Lurie College Promise Group

SJSU Lurie College of Education Promise Group 2019 Fall

I wish I had a program like the Promise Group when I was a first-year college student.  I progressed through undergrad as a first-generation student, all the way to becoming a professor at SJSU.  However, it took years to find mentors who could best help me toward success.  Today, I am thrilled to be part of a program that facilitates that search and provides mentorship for SJSU students.

The Promise Group fosters a caring and supportive community of belonging, encourages relationship building, and cultivates a culture of appreciation, which reflects the “holistic” goal of the Lurie College of Education’s strategic plan.

  • Supportive Community of Belonging – Serving as a faculty mentor has given me opportunities to build meaningful relationships with my student mentees.  My mentors continue to be an important part of my life and I am glad to be that for my students today.  For instance, I have watched one mentee progress and graduate with her bachelor’s degree and my other mentee has started college in the most difficult of circumstances – during a global pandemic.  Our regular meetings have not only helped her develop strategies for success in college but help both of us feel a sense of connection, especially while we all work remotely.
  • Relationship Building – Serving as a faculty mentor has not only been about me imparting my knowledge and wisdom, but I am always learning from my mentee.  Whether it’s how to order Boba tea, keeping up with pop culture, or brainstorming teaching and research ideas together, I leave every encounter with a new perspective and a better sense of my mentee as a complete person.
  • Appreciation – It brings me great pride and joy to recognize and appreciate all of my mentee’s accomplishments and progress.  We celebrate small wins after each meeting (like getting a paper submitted), and BIG wins, like getting their first full-time job after graduation.  It is exciting to serve as their cheerleader along their academic journey!

…and speaking of appreciation: a big Thank you goes out to Donna Bee-Gates for all of her hard work in leading this group, and for pairing me with amazing mentees.  Watching all members of the group develop over time and successfully move into their next adventure is a highpoint of my work at SJSU.

– Dina Izenstark, Assistant Professor in Child and Adolescent Development