Upcoming NSSLHA Org Meetings

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Communicative Disorders and Sciences students are encouraged to join the SJSU National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) chapter, which represents students’ interests, sponsors local speaker seminars, and participates in community service projects and fundraising activities. For more information about upcoming events and opportunities, visit the SJSU NSSHLA InstagramTwitterFacebook page, or email us at sjsunsslhachapter@gmail.com.

Join us every other Thursday at 3pm on Zoom for our meetings! There will be in person socials and online educational meetings in alternation. Register soon and mark your calendars. Connect with us on Instagram @sjsunsslhachapter for more details.

  • Thursday, September 2
  • Thursday, September 16
  • Thursday, September 30
  • Thursday, October 14
  • Thursday, October 28
  • Thursday, November 11
  • Thursday, November 25
  • Thursday, December 9

Transforming the Way We Teach

Ellen Middaugh teaching in a classroom pre-pandemic

How can pursuing an education help you find your voice — and how can you use your voice to transform others?

San José State’s Connie L. Lurie College of Education is subverting the hierarchies embedded in higher education, primarily “systemic racism that has historically prevented full inclusion and equity for our BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) students, staff, and faculty,” one initiative at a time. Starting in 2018, Dean Heather Lattimer invited students, staff and faculty to participate in a year-long strategic planning process to brainstorm innovative ways to disrupt education. How could each department, from Teacher Education to Communicative Disorders and Sciences, create an environment that promoted inclusivity, diversity and anti-racist thought?

The first step? Listening. Listening to our teachers, undergraduates, graduate students and staff as well as educators working in the field, researchers and policymakers. Listening to lecturers like Marcella McCollum, ’05 MA Speech Pathology, ’22 EdD, who not only volunteered to serve on the strategic planning committee but also proposed a minor in Transformative Leadership in partnership with Rebeca Burciaga, professor of educational leadership and Chicana and Chicano Studies.

“We need to think about changing paradigms,” says McCollum. “We cannot just offer a class or textbook that tells you how to overcome the challenges that exist in our current educational systems as they are designed. We want students to question why things are the way they are. We want them to have the tools, so they can push back when something looks unjust.”

Throughout the year-long process, the strategic planning committee interviewed students, gathered research and collaborated to update the college mission. The committee created an identity statement and formed four strategic pillars — community engagement, cultural sustainability, holistic approaches and interdisciplinary collaboration — which unites the college’s work across departments. Faculty, staff and students were then invited to submit grant proposals for endeavors that aligned with those pillars.

Luz Nicacio, ’21 Child and Adolescent Development, provided key insight as the only undergraduate on the committee who helped review grant proposals, provide feedback to those submitting ideas and select those that would be awarded funding.

“I saw how influential my voice was in deciding the college’s direction,” she says. “Being on the committee showed me that my college values the opinions of its students and does care about us.”

Read the full story from Julia Halprin Jackson on the SJSU Transform website.

Lurie College Faculty Featured by SJSU Writing Center

Shoutout to Special Education faculty Saili Kulkarni, who was recently featured by the SJSU Writing Center in their Better Know a Dept series!

“My particular research interests are to understand how race and disability inform teacher beliefs and practices. I am particularly interested in how special education teachers of color enact their beliefs in classrooms for multiply marginalized youth across disability and race. I am additionally interested in how discipline and behavior are approached for young children of color with disabilities. In far too many instances, these children are being harshly disciplined or excluded from spaces with their peers for minor behavioral issues. I am interested in how we can reframe discipline and be more restorative (draw from restorative justice) in our approaches to discipline for young people.”

Read the entire feature on the SJSU Writing Center blog.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Special Education Faculty Saili Kulkarni 2021

Lurie College Faculty Published in National Geographic

Congratulations to Child and Adolescent Development faculty Dina Izenstark, who was quoted in the National Geographic article “Want better talks with your kids? Take them outside.” Read the article at on.natgeo.com/3lB5X6x
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“Nature restores people’s ability to pay attention to conversations and reduces their mental fatigue,” says Dina Izenstark, associate professor of child and adolescent development at San José State University and one of the authors of the 2021 study. “This can help family members communicate more effectively and get along better with one another.”
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Read the abstract of the study at bit.ly/3tLKBa8
SJSU Lurie College of Education Child and Adolescent Development Department Faculty Dina Izenstark 2

Upcoming Student Org Events

Join our Counselor Education Graduate Organization (CEGO) on Tuesday, September 14, from 5:30-6:30pm at the Grad to chat, hang out, and meet new people!

Join our National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) on Thursday, September 16, from 3-4pm in Sweeney Hall 433 for a game night to play games, make friends, and enjoy snacks!

SJSU Lurie College of Education NSSLHA Fall 2021 Game Night

Lurie College Faculty Publishes Journal Article

Congratulations to Special Education faculty Saili Kulkarni, who co-published “A QuantCrit Analysis of Context, Discipline, Special Education, and Disproportionality” in AERA Open.  Read the article abstract below and read the full article at bit.ly/3jGCzf2.

Using a dis/ability critical race theory (DisCrit) and critical quantitative (QuantCrit) lens, we examine disproportionate application of exclusionary discipline on multiply marginalized youth, foregrounding systemic injustice and institutionalized racism. In doing so, we examined temporal-, student-, and school-level factors that may result in exclusion and othering (i.e., placing into special education and punishing with out-of-school suspensions) within one school district. We frame this study in DisCrit and QuantCrit frameworks to connect data-based decision making to sociocultural understandings of the ways in which schools use both special education and discipline to simultaneously provide and limit opportunities for different student groups. Results showed a complex interconnectedness between student sociodemographic labels (e.g., gender, race, and socioeconomic status) and factors associated with both special education identification and exclusionary discipline. Our findings suggest that quantitative studies lacking in-depth theoretical justification may perpetuate deficit understandings of the racialization of disability and intersections with exclusionary discipline.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Special Education Faculty Saili Kulkarni 2021

Counselor Education Students Participate in International ZoomPal Project

In collaboration with Dr. Insoo Oh at Ewha Womans University in South Korea, Counselor Education faculty Dr. Kyoung Mi Choi facilitated a week-long international virtual exchange program from August 8 to August 12, 2021. It was a wonderful opportunity for seven Counselor Education graduate students, Victor Calvillo Chavez, Yesenia Torres, Jasmine Torres, Laura Sheldon, Jilian Gomez, Ligia Briseno, Elvia Hernandez, at San José State University to co-facilitate a small group discussion and to engage in cross-cultural conversation with 13 Korean college students at Ewha Womans University about a range of topics, including diversity in college life, learning styles and academic success, career exploration and decision-making process, friendship and romantic relationships, and self-care and mental health in COVID-19. Dr. Samuel Y. Kim (assistant professor at the University of Denver) and Julia Kim (graduate student in Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education), also joined as guest speakers and shared their cross-cultural expertise and experiences.

CSU Statement in Support of Culturally Sustaining, Equity Driven, and Justice Focused Pedagogies

Juneteenth March and Rally at SJSU

The SJSU Lurie College of Education is committed to taking action to advance racial justice and educational equity. As deans, we are in solidarity with our faculty, students, staff, alumni, and community partners whose work confronts structural racism, inequity, and oppression in our educational systems and society at large. At a time when there is tremendous pressure and scrutiny on educators, we want to make clear our responsibility and commitment to support our colleagues and community to speak truth, advance our collective understanding through research and teaching, and advocate for justice.

Education Deans and Leaders from campuses across the California State University system are similarly allied with educators who advance culturally sustaining, equity driven, and justice focused pedagogies and have issued a statement to voice their support.  Learn more about our Lurie College Racial Justice Priorities and Strategic Plan Initiatives at sjsu.edu/education/community/strategic-plan.

Attend the Lurie College Student Open Forum

SJSU Lurie College of Education Student Forum

Join Dean Heather Lattimer and Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro on Wednesday, September 1, from 3-4pm on Zoom for an informal discussion about your student priorities!  The information to join the Zoom discussion was sent to Lurie College students via a Google Calendar email invitaiton.

Meet the SJSU NSSLHA Student Org Board

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We’ve got a Full House…of Board!! So excited to introduce you to our NSSLHA Board for the 2021-2022 school year. We are all looking forward to getting to know you and work with you all this year. Wishing everyone a strong start💙💛🤩

Our SJSU National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) enables students to have access to professional, educational, and clinical resources and participate in American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and NSSLHA sponsored events.  Connect with SJSU NSSLHA on Instagram (@sjsunsslhachapter), Twitter (@sjsunsslha), Facebook (@sjsuNSSLHA), or sjsunsslhachapter@gmail.com.

Watch the Lurie College Reorientation Video Series

Welcome, Lurie College students!  Whether you are returning to campus for the first time since the Spring 2020 semester or arriving on campus for the first time ever, we thought this Reorientation video series, hosted by our Lurie College Student Success Center Peer Mentors, Alina Torres and Maritza Ortiz-Urrutia, and Lurie College Advisor, Francesca Teixeira, would be helpful for you. Gather information about study spaces, transportation, safety, and more in the videos below.

New SJSU Minor in Transformative Leadership

Our new SJSU undergraduate Minor in Transformative Leadership is an interdisciplinary approach to leadership development through engagement with anti-racist pedagogies and practices. By building a foundation and framework for developing an intersectional lens throughout this program, students develop their leadership goals around becoming transformative agents of change in their communities through meaningful, culturally affirming, and sustaining practices!

Our Fall 2021 courses include EDLD 120 – The Right to Learn: Language, Dignity, and Education as well as EDLD 160 – 1st Generation College Students Pathways.  Watch the video below to meet our Lurie College faculty who are teaching the courses – Dr. Veneice Guillory-Lacy, Dr. María Ledesma, and Dr. Luis Poza – and learn more about our Transformative Leadership Minor at sjsu.edu/edleadership/academics/undergraduate-minor or email us at transformativeleadership-group@sjsu.edu.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Transformative Leadership Minor Fall 2021 Courses

Apply to Participate in Our Lurie College En-Queer-Tros Initiative

We are seeking Lurie College students who are members of the LGBTQIA+ community and want to lead trainings and shape the future of inclusive education within our college!  Apply now to become a member of our new En-queer-tros initiative and get paid to use your knowledge, skills, and experience to make Lurie College more queer affirming.  Apply at tinyurl.com/enqueertros or email Child and Adolescent Development faculty Robert Marx at  robert.marx@sjsu.edu for more information.

SJSU-Lurie-College-of-Education-Enqueertros-2-1024x1024

Lurie College Student Selected for CCREE Fellowship

SJSU Lurie College of Education EdD Leadership Program Student Sofia Fojas

For Immediate Release
From the San José State University (SJSU) Center for Collaborative Research Excellence in Education (CCREE)

SAN JOSÉ STATE UNIVERSITY – CENTER FOR COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION (CCREE) has awarded a 3-year Doctoral Fellowship to Sofia Fojas through partnership funding provided by the SJSU Ed.D. Leadership Program and the Connie L. Lurie College of Education.

Dr. Brent Duckor, Director of SJSU’s CCREE says the goal of the multi-year fellowship is to engage in applied research that addresses and advances equitable outcomes for students in foster care and students experiencing homelessness in the K-12 population. He notes that this fellowship will provide advanced training in quantitative and qualitative research methods and opportunities for engagement in education policy with a focus on moving research into spheres of professional training and practice. We are extremely pleased and honored to have Ms. Sofia Fojas with us, said Duckor.

“I look forward to serving as a doctoral fellow at San José State University and studying policy for students experiencing homelessness and youth receiving foster care services. I am ready to step into the next phase of my life. I chose to pursue my doctoral studies in the Ed.D. Leadership program here among many other programs because here I see an opportunity for serving as a catalyst for large-scale change at the policy level for the most disenfranchised students in our education system” says Ms. Fojas.

Sofia Fojas was born in Hawaii to immigrant parents and moved with her family in the 1970’s to San Jose, California where she graduated from high school and returned to Hawaii to earn a degree in anthropology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Ms. Fojas has served as a music educator for twenty-seven years, a public school music teacher (grades 2-12) and an administrator for the arts in two school districts in Northern California.
Sofia is currently serving as the Arts Coordinator for Santa Clara County of Education. She is the regional Arts lead at the state level in California, and also serves as a board member of a national arts education organization.

Sofia is a professional violinist and performs with San Francisco Bay Area local and regional ensembles. Sofia has performed with Los Cenzontles and recorded with them on an album of the Chieftains. She has played in backup orchestras behind Natalie Cole, Dionne Warwick, Andy Williams, Smokey Robinson, and Johnny Mathis. Passionate about the role of art and music in transforming lives, Sofia Fojas brings a powerful lens to the study of policy change that puts the whole curriculum back into focus, say her doctoral advisors, Dr. Brent Duckor and Dr. Lorri Capizzi. After a long fascination with STEAM education, “Her vision of La cultura cura – culturally specific arts can be the foundation of authentic interventions for students experiencing homelessness and youth in foster care, each of whom need our support and connection now more than ever,” says Dr. Capizzi.

As Sofia notes, “The success of any effective academic intervention is rooted in connecting with the heart, not only the head. The arts can make that emotional connection that I believe is critical to effectively addressing and bridging the opportunity gap for our most vulnerable youth. I have combined my love for and commitment to culturally responsive arts education my whole life. This fellowship will help me bring to life even deeper arts education work aimed at diversity, equity, inclusion, and most importantly, access for our most underserved students across the state.”

How Can Educators and Parents Prepare for the K-12 School year? A Q&A with Lara Ervin-Kassab

SJSU Early Childhood Institute

SJSU faculty interact with a small child in the Lurie College’s Child Development Laboratory Preschool in Feb. 2020. Photo by Bob Bain.

This story was originally published by Julia Halprin Jackson on the SJSU Newsroom blog.

Whether you’re a K-12 educator, caregiver or parent, this fall promises more than the usual back-to-school excitement and anxiety. Nearly 18 months into the COVID-19 pandemic, caregivers and educators must, once again, evaluate how to safely interact with learners while feeling the pressure to make up for lost time.

As the spouse of a high school teacher and mother to a kindergartner and a 1-year-old, I’m all too familiar with these concerns. While I’ll feel better once my kids can access a vaccine, I am still eager to usher them both into classrooms of some kind next week. Like many of my peers, I have way more questions than answers.

Lucky for me, San José State’s Connie L. Lurie College of Education is home to experts like Assistant Professor of Teacher Education Lara Ervin-Kassab, who has 25 years of experience teaching pre-K through graduate school.

This summer, she offered a webinar on considering community and trauma as part of Lurie College’s K-12 Teaching Academy. She was kind enough to answer my questions — and yes, lower my blood pressure — about preparing for school in a COVID world.

How can schools, educators and parents prepare students for returning to a classroom environment?

Lara Ervin-Kassab (LEK): Everyone has experienced some level of trauma during the pandemic, and we need to acknowledge that in others and in ourselves.

First, this is an opportunity for us to step back and ask, what is really worthwhile in education? What is the actual purpose of this whole process? What do we really want it to do?

Then, we can reprioritize and open up dialogues around how we make schools a place where everyone feels supported coming out of this traumatic experience. How can we make schools a place where everyone’s humanity is acknowledged and engaged and their interests are being heard?

How have districts addressed some of these concerns? 

LEK: Several of our local districts and parent-teacher associations have started these conversations about what we want schools to look and feel like. At least one district has moved toward offering an in-house online school for parents and students who may have concerns about going back to face-to-face. That, again, is an opportunity to look at making sure our educational system is thinking about everyone’s needs and how those can best be supported.

How has COVID-19 affected how teachers design and implement curriculum?

LEK: I teach a course in classroom management for pre-K and K-12 teachers. I’ve also been researching how teachers should continue to use technology.

I think there has been resistance to changing some of the ways we teach in order to better utilize technology, and COVID either reinforced resistance to the tech or helped teachers overcome their fears. A lot of us used tools we never used before, and the ways we used those tools caused us to reflect on how we’ll continue to use them moving forward.

For instance, I feel strongly that all student voices need to be heard. In a face-to-face classroom, you have students who may never speak, who may not raise their hands or who may feel really uncomfortable engaging that way. Since teaching online, a lot of the students who usually don’t want to raise their hands or speak out loud were very engaged through the virtual chat feature.

So, going forward, how can I still provide my students with that ability to be a part of the conversation through chat once we’re back in a face-to-face environment?

Many of my teaching colleagues have provided their students with options to do videos or podcasts in lieu of more traditional assignments. This semester will be a test case for what sticks and what doesn’t, not only in K-12, but in education writ large and even in the corporate world.

As COVID protocols continue to shift and the Delta variant poses a threat this fall, how can teachers manage their own stress, mental health and well-being as well as that of their students?

LEK: I recommend teachers and parents look into the Center for Reaching and Teaching the Whole Child, which was founded by Emerita Professor of Elementary Education Nancy Markowitz. It is grounded in the idea of helping the whole person learn. It’s very integrated with  social emotional learning — helping our students learn to engage socially to understand and regulate their own emotions.

This is especially important after more than a year of being isolated from other people. With every class I teach, whether in person or online, I start with a short mindfulness activity that helps reinforce how to breathe and sit in the present.

The center has a great teacher competency anchor framework that reminds teachers to do the work alongside their students. So, for teachers and parents alike, if you take a few minutes to practice mindfulness with your kids, remember to practice it yourself. These activities are very helpful when you or your kids are feeling overwhelmed.

What main message do you have about returning to school, whatever it looks like, in 2021?

LEK: Be patient. Be kind to yourself and to all the people around you.

Take this uncertainty and find ways to embrace your creativity. This year is an opportunity for us to acknowledge the discomfort, and with that, we can either push back and close down, or we can say, “This is uncomfortable. What do I need to do to make it better? How creative can I be right now? How can I think of how these possibilities could recognize our diversity?”

What’s one tip you’d give every parent and teacher?

LEK: When you’re not sure about something, ask the children and listen to their answers. Because even children as young as 2 or 3 years old have a really good sense of what they need. They may not have the vocabulary for it, and they may not be able to distinguish between what they want and what they need, but if you have a conversation with them, you can begin to understand what they need.

Watch Ervin-Kassab’s 2021 K-12 Teaching Academy webinar, “Considering Community and Trauma,” for more resources for teachers, caregivers and parents.

Lurie College Student Presenting at Higher Ed Conference

Congratulations to Child and Adolescent Development and Educational Leadership student Vinson Vũ, whose program proposal “Resilient Superstars: How We Can Support the Futures of Trans+ Young Adults” has been accepted for the 2021 NASPA Western Regional Conference!

Lurie College Faculty Publishes Op-ed Around Advancing Justice and Equity

Shoutout to Communicative Disorders and Sciences faculty Nidhi Mahendra, who recently co-published “Advancing Justice, Equity in the Pipeline to the Professions: Reconfiguring graduate training program admissions is key to foundational change” on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Leader newsmagazine!  Read the op-ed at bit.ly/3yEggvJ

SJSU Lurie College of Education Communicative Disorders and Sciences Department Faculty Nidhi Mahendra

ChAD Department Featured in Reading Partners Newsletter

Congratulations to our Child and Adolescent Development department, which was highlighted in a recent Reading Partners newsletter!  Read the full feature below.

SJSU CHAD Reading Partners 02

Each year, Reading Partners collaborates with San José State University’s (SJSU) childhood and adolescent development (ChAD) program to provide opportunities for their undergraduate students, who are on-track to becoming educators, to work with local K-4th grade students in the Silicon Valley community. SJSU’s ChAD students learn the concepts around becoming effective instructors and educators in their coursework, and through the partnership with Reading Partners, their undergraduates are able to implement and refine the skills they learn through tutoring our students.

SJSU ChAD students have shown continued resiliency in how they deliver tutoring sessions to our students, whether it is online via our virtual platform or in person at our reading centers. We are constantly amazed by how thoughtful and committed ChAD students are; as a result, we want to commend and recognize our SJSU partners for serving as tutors and role models for many K-4th grade students throughout our community.

Learn more about ChAD’s service learning opportunities at sjsu.edu/chad/resources/service-learning

Lurie College Reimagines the Future of Education at the Inaugural Learner Design Summit

SJSU Lurie College of Education REP4 Learner Design Summit Group Photo

How do you design inclusive models for teaching and learning? It’s simple: Ask the students.

Last week, the Lurie College held its first Learner Design Summit to launch SJSU’s regional Rapid Education Prototyping (REP4) Alliance.

The REP4 Alliance is a powerful network of regional and national education, industry and technology leaders, led by the six founding higher education partners, including the Lurie College. This alliance brings together diverse learners to develop new ideas for higher education programming using liberatory design principles.

At the summit, a total of 25 local students, including rising 11th and 12th graders, recent high school graduates, community college students and SJSU undergraduates collaborated and designed creative proposals, or “prototypes,” to address existing challenges in the higher education system.

“A prototype is a pitch that students prepare to showcase the needs and solutions that create institutional change,” said Rebeca Burciaga, professor of educational leadership and Chicana and Chicano Studies as well as the faculty executive director of SJSU’s Institute of Emancipatory Education (IEE).

“SJSU student mentors are leading what we call ‘dream teams’ to dream up these ideas. We hope to find ways to incorporate their solutions and perhaps work with campus leaders to make those immediate changes.”

San José State President Mary Papazian kicked off the weeklong event with a message for the Spartan community.

“We believe that initiatives such as emancipatory education and REP4 support the development of equitable and inclusive educational systems that nurture the creativity and brilliance of all learners so that our diverse, democratic society can truly thrive,” she said.

“Collectively, the themes of this work are well-aligned with SJSU’s interests in advancing and transforming our educational systems, which many of us believe are in urgent need of radical change.”

Read the full story on by Julia Halprin Jackson on the SJSU Newsroom blog.

Lurie College Black Graduate Support Group

SJSU Lurie College of Education Black Graduate Student Support Group

Hello, my name is Desirae McNeil.  I am a graduate student ambassador for the Lurie college here at San Jose State University.  As a student ambassador, I have an opportunity to hear and support graduate students in the college.  It was on my heart to start a community with other Black-identifying grad students together.  If you identify as a Black graduate student and are interested in creating a space to meet once or twice a month to support one another, please complete this intake form.

Cultural Diversity ZoomPal Project

ZoomPal Project

In collaboration with Dr. Insoo Oh at Ewha Womans University in South Korea, Counselor Education faculty Kyoung Mi Choi invites SJSU undergraduate students to join our upcoming Cultural Diversity ZoomPal project, which will take place from Monday, August 9 – Friday, August 13.  This will be a wonderful opportunity for Korean American students at San Jose State University to engage in cross-cultural conversation with Korean college students at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea, about a range of topics:

  • Monday, August 9, 7-8pm | Diversity in college life
  • Tuesday, August 10, 7-8pm | Learning styles and academic success
  • Wednesday, August 11, 7-8pm | Career exploration and decision making process
  • Thursday, August 12, 7-8pm | Friendship and romantic relationships
  • Friday, August 13, 7-8pm | Self-care and mental health

To express your interest in this opportunity, complete this Google form.

Student Spotlight: Huy Le

SJSU Lurie College of Education Counselor Education Student Huy Le

“As a future community college counselor, I am keenly determined to decrease these unequal, recurring rates by closing the achievement gap among first-generation, low-income college students from diverse backgrounds so that they can attain their educational goals.”

Congratulations to Counselor Education student Huy Le, who was selected by the SJSU College of Graduate Studies to receive the Bertha Kalm scholarship for the 2021-2022 academic year!  Learn more about Huy on the College of Graduate Studies’ blog.

Lurie College Faculty Featured in New York Times Critical Race Theory Article

Shoutout to Department of Educational Leadership faculty María Ledesma, who was quoted in the recent New York Times article!  The story – “Critical Race Theory: A Brief History – How a complicated and expansive academic theory developed during the 1980s has become a hot-button political issue 40 years later” – is available at nyti.ms/3iRJocl

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educational Leadership Department Faculty María Ledesma

Watch our Summer 2021 SJSU x REP4 Learner Design Summit

The newly-established Rapid Education Prototyping (REP4) Alliance is a powerful network of regional and national education, industry, and technology leaders, led by the six founding higher education partners, including the SJSU Lurie College of Education. This alliance will create opportunities to bring together diverse learners to codesign new ideas for education using liberatory design principles.

In Summer 2021, we launched this network with a free Learner Design Summit, which is a leadership development opportunity designed to bring together rising 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students, recent high school graduates, community college students, and SJSU undergraduate students to collaborate and design creative proposals to address existing challenges in the higher education system.

Watch the video above to learn more about the proposals from our student design leaders, who met one another for the first time, came up with and refined their proposals, and presented them to the SJSU President and senior administration within 4 days.

  • 0:00 – Welcome from SJSU Lurie College of Education Dean Heather Lattimer
  • 3:07 – Intro from Department of Educational Leadership faculty Veneice Guillory-Lacy
  • 5:20 – “CC: The Dream (Creating and Continuing the Dream)” by College 2.0
  • 11:28 – “Creating Connections” by Creative Connections
  • 18:33 – “How Integrating Community and Technology Can Help Students” by Three Trees
  • 24:25 – “Elevation Promise” by Equity Ambassadors
  • 37:26 – Response by Dean Heather Lattimer
  • 38:38 – Remarks by SJSU President Mary Papazian
  • 43:43 – Closing remarks by Dean Heather Lattimer

New Spartan Accelerated Graduate Education (SAGE) Programs Coming Fall 2021

Our innovative SAGE in Teacher Education programs create opportunities for SJSU undergraduate students to enroll in Credential and Masters programs while simultaneously completing their final three semesters of their undergraduate degrees. These programs offer SAGE scholars a combined pathway of theory, practice, and K-12 subject matter. The programs integrate these three legs of teaching early and often, and give scholars ample time to assimilate the linkages prior to when they are required to demonstrate understanding and skills through student teaching.

Benefits of Enrolling in a SAGE Program

  • Reduced economic barriers to entering into a graduate program
  • No application fee for graduate program
  • Fewer total units in combined SAGE program than completing each program separately
  • Shorter timeline to earning credential and master’s degree
  • Enhanced professional development

SAGE Programs Accepting Applications in Fall 2021 for a Spring 2022 Start

Attend an Upcoming Info Session

Learn more about these programs, including eligibility, requirements, and admissions processes, on the SJSU Catalog’s SAGE webpage and register to attend a summer SAGE Information Session on Monday, July 26, at 9am or Wednesday August 4, at 4pm. More info sessions will be available in Fall.