Join us for Episode 6 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Ana leads a dialogue around antiracist education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What was your initial reaction to the articles and the video? Did anything surprise you?
  • How would you define antiracist education?
  • What do you think are antiracist strategies for teachers? Do you agree with the ones presented in the video?
  • The first article discusses the need to go beyond ethnic studies courses and include anti-racist education in all subjects. How do you think schools and districts can accomplish this?
  • The second article discusses Trump-era policies that sought to prevent schools from teaching critical race theory and federally funded agencies from offering diversity training. While this is no longer an issue under the Biden administration, should we be concerned about such things happening in the future? What do you think is the likelihood of a future administration trying to enact such policies, and is there anything we can do about it in the meantime?
  • Can you identify any challenges to implementing strategies for antiracist education? How can we overcome these?
  • Why is antiracist education important to you? Why do you think it’s important that schools commit to antiracist education?

after reading the articles “California schools, universities condemn anti-Asian attacks, offer support to students” by Carolyn Jones and Ashley Smith and “Diversity Work, Interrupted” by Colleen Flaherty and watching the video “6 Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” by Edutopia.

This episode’s call to action: Watch the video “Six Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” and try to implement at least one of those strategies in your classroom. Additionally, since many of these ideas are applicable beyond the classroom, think about what it would look like for you to implement such practices in your daily life. What can you do to combat racism in your community?

Additional Antiracism and Racial Justice resources are available on the Lurie College website at sjsu.edu/education/community/antiracism.  All of the recordings for this series are available at http://sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Apply for Lurie College Scholarships for the 2021-2022 Academic Year

Thanks to generous monetary support from alumni and friends, each year Lurie College is able to award current and incoming undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students with scholarships based on their academic, personal, and professional affiliations, accomplishments, and aspirations. Current and newly-admitted students can apply for these awards through the SJSU scholarship application portal until Saturday, May 1, for the 2021-2022 academic year.  Learn more and watch the recording of our scholarships workshop at sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid.

2020-2021 Lurie College Scholarship Summary

  • Number of students awarded: 110
  • Amount of scholarship funds awarded: $265,400
  • Median award amount: $1000; Average award amount: $2413

Attend Our Lurie College Dean’s Forum

Hello Lurie College Students!

We hope you’ll be able to join us for this student open forum. We’ll be joined by Dean Heather Lattimer, Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro, and Student Success Center Director Janene Perez. This will be a great opportunity to have any questions or concerns you have addressed.

The Zoom link for this forum was emailed as a Google Calendar invite to your SJSU email accounts.  If you won’t be able to attend this event, there will be others later in the semester. Please see below for the full schedule. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to luriecollege@sjsu.edu.

  • Thursday, February 25: 11:45am – 12:45pm
  • Thursday, March 18: 10:45 – 11:45am
  • Wednesday, April 28: 3:00 – 4:00pm
  • Wednesday, May 5: 2:00 – 3:00pm

SJSU Lurie College of Education Spring 2021 Deans Forum 2

Upcoming Lurie College Program Info Sessions

SJSU Lurie College of Education Ed.D Leadership Program Students

The time to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader is now!  The SJSU Lurie College of Education is hosting several upcoming info sessions for prospective students to learn more about our academic opportunities and the details for the Summer 2021 and Fall 2021 application cycles.  Select any of the links below to learn more about how to join the Zoom session for each session and please help spread the word to anyone who you think will find these opportunities of interest.

SJSU Connie L. Lurie College of Education Ranked #2 Among CSUs in Graduate School Rankings

SJSU Lurie College of Education 2022 U.S. News & World Report

Written by Julia Halprin Jackson, University Writer and Copy Editor

U.S. News & World Report ranked the Connie L. Lurie College of Education as #2 among schools offering graduate programs in education in the California State University system.  

The rankings, released March 30, showed a marked improvement over last year, despite the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Of the 277 schools included, the Lurie College was ranked in these four categories:

  • #2 among CSUs (tied for #2 last year)
  • #4 among universities in the Bay Area (up from #5 last year)
  • #14 among universities in CA (up from #16 last year)
  • Tied for #125 overall (up from #158 last year)

The ranking methodology scores schools on quality assessment, student selectivity, faculty resources and research activity. U.S. News also assesses incoming students’ preparedness and career outcomes of its alumni.

“Not only did we move ahead in the overall rankings and within the CSU, Bay Area and California, but we also received more points from the reviewers in the administrator/expert assessment score,” said Isabel Vallejo, director of assessment and accreditation for the Lurie College. 

The Lurie College has engaged with the education community more broadly through seminars, special events hosting renowned practitioners in education and educational leadership, and that is allowing the community to see what we as a college have to offer.”

Vallejo explained  that the survey requests feedback from professionals, community partners and colleagues, adding that she believes they scored favorably because the Lurie College has expanded its work with PK-12 districts and with community college partners. This is especially evident with the college’s advisory board, which consists of dedicated professionals who offer opportunities for collaboration.

The ranking submission was further strengthened, Vallejo said, because she submitted his data about funded research by faculty as well as related expenditures. 

“While we are still a small college compared to some others included in the rankings in terms of enrollment, we are growing, and most importantly, we are having an important impact in our preparation of education professionals who live and work in the Bay Area and Silicon Valley,” she said.

“The growth in our standing in the latest rankings is a testament to the dedication of our faculty, staff and community partners, and the excellence of our students and alumni,” said Heather Lattimer, dean of the Lurie College. 

“This past year has been incredibly challenging as our college community has navigated the COVID-19 pandemic, ongoing acts of racial violence and oppression, wildfires, and political turmoil, all while continuing to create transformative educational opportunities in our college and in the communities that our college serves.

“At the same time, this past year has underscored the importance of the work that we do and confirms the emancipatory stance that our college has taken. We look forward to continuing to grow and amplify this work as we emerge from the pandemic.”

Apply for Lurie College Grants

Student Research Awards | Apply by Mon., Apr. 12

  • The Lurie College of Education is pleased to offer up to three student-research awards for the 2021-2022 academic year to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project.  These awards are designed to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major.  Students can receive an award of $2,000 per semester and $4,000 a year.  Apply for a research award via this Google form.

Student Research Supplies Grant | Apply by Mon., May 3

  • Undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students are eligible to apply for up to one $200 grant per fiscal year (July 1 – May 31) towards expenses for research supplies to conduct their academic research.  A limited amount of funding is available.  To apply for a Lurie College Student Research Supplies Grant, please download and complete this brief form (PDF).

Strategic Plan Grant | Apply by Mon., Mar. 29

  • We are pleased to announce the request for proposals (RFP) for our 2021-22 Lurie College Strategic Plan Seed Grants.  Lurie College’s Strategic Plan Seed Grants are designed to advance the priorities articulated in our strategic plan.   All faculty, staff, and students in our Lurie College community are eligible to apply for seed grant funding.  Initial draft proposals are due Monday, March 29.  Submit your grant proposal by completing this Google form.  If you have questions about these grant opportunities, please email lurie-steering-group@sjsu.edu.

Hardship Grant

  • Lurie College has a limited amount of grant funds available to support its students who have experienced an unforeseen financial hardship that will prevent them from continuing their enrollment at Lurie College and SJSU.  If you are a Lurie College undergraduate, graduate, credential, or doctoral student who has experienced this type of hardship, please complete this brief Google form so that a Lurie College advisor can contact you to discuss this option as well as other possible campus resources.

Save the Date: Spring 2021 SJSU Lurie College Graduation Celebration

SJSU Lurie College of Education Graduation Celebration Spring 2021

We’re excited to recognize and celebrate our next class of SJSU Lurie College of Education alumni during our Spring 2021 Graduation Celebration, which will take place on Friday, May 28, at 4pm PDT!  Graduates will receive additional information via email regarding how to participate.  Family and friends of our graduates are invited to watch the ceremony live on our Lurie College YouTube channel at bit.ly/lurie-youtube.

#IBelongAtLurieCollege | Desirae McNeil

What provides you with a sense of belonging at Lurie College?  Is it your drive to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader?  A faculty member, advisor, your friends or student groups?  The events and culture?  Share with us on Instagram by tagging @sjsulurie and using the hashtag #IBelongAtLurieCollege in your caption or email us at brian.cheungdooley@sjsu.edu so we can share uplifting stories from our community.  Learn about Desirae McNeil, Department of Counselor Education graduate student, and what provides her with a sense of belonging!

“Here at Lurie College of Education, there are numerous opportunities to get involved on campus and in the community through student organization and leadership roles. Being involved in student organizations and utilizing my resources has provided me with a sense of belonging here at Lurie College.”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Counselor Education Student Desirae McNeil

Watch Episode 4 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Vaishnavi leads a dialogue around inequality and access in education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are some examples of initiatives at the classroom, school/university, state, or federal level that have been effective at creating a more equitable education for low income students? What are some examples of ineffective initiatives or missed opportunities?
  • How do you think race plays a factor in schooling in low income communities? The videos provided some examples. Did anything stand out to you?
  • In the Crash Course video, we saw that higher income parents are more likely to spend time with their children reading books and strengthening their cognitive skills. These higher income children enter school with more knowledge compared to a child from a lower income household. How can we support these young children early on to ensure that they are successful throughout their school journey?
  • FAFSA is a great way for students to get grants and money. However, do you think FAFSA is a simple process for low income families? Why or why not?
  • After reading the article on the factors that count against low income students in the college admissions process, what were your thoughts/initial reactions? Do you think that students that attend schools with extremely low budgets will always have no hope towards attending good colleges since they don’t have impressive extracurriculars or classes?

after reading the article “5 Ways Elite-College Admissions Shut Out Poor Kids” by Anya Kamenetz and watching the videos “Higher Education for Low-Income Students,” and “Schools & Social Inequality: Crash Course Sociology #41.”

This episode’s call to action: After our discussion, think about how San Jose State University aids low income students to continue attending classes. Find one resource that SJSU provides to support these students. Do you think this resource is helpful? Is there a resource that you would recommend to SJSU instead?

Join us live for our episode 5 on Friday, April 9, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Apply by May 1 for SJSU and Lurie College Scholarships for 2021-2022

The SJSU Spartan Scholarship Application portal is now open to those who will be enrolled during the 2021-2022 academic year!  Applications for SJSU Lurie College of Education scholarships are due by Saturday, May 1, 2021.  Visit sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid to access the link to the SJSU Spartan Scholarship Application portal, watch the recording of our recent scholarship application workshop, and learn about other Lurie College financial aid opportunities.

Reflections from Dean Heather Lattimer on 1 Year Anniversary of COVID-19 Shelter-in-Place

Watch this video to listen to SJSU Lurie College of Education Dean Heather Lattimer share some reflections on the 1 year anniversary of when Santa Clara County and SJSU first transitioned to a shelter-in-place in response to COVID-19 and share some updates and optimism about returning to SJSU to teach, learn, and work in person as we look ahead to the Fall 2021 semester.  The full text of Dean Lattimer’s remarks is available below.

Dear Lurie College students, faculty, and staff,

It has been one year since we left campus due to COVID-19.  When we said goodbye a year ago, I suggested that staff and faculty pack up what they would need for a couple of months – just to be on the safe side. It has obviously been a lot more than a couple of months.

As I reflect back on the past year, I am both heartbroken and grateful.  I am heartbroken by the incalculable losses that we’ve witnessed – Friends and family members lost to COVID and other illnesses.  Job losses and financial insecurities.  Exacerbated inequality.  Anti-Asian, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant violence targeted toward our BIPOC communities. Isolation and mental health challenges. Wildfire-related disruptions and displacements.  Missing celebrations and curtailed rites of passage.  These losses are real and significant and we grieve them with you.

But I am grateful too – I have been so deeply impressed by the resilience and commitment of our Lurie College community. During the past year, we’ve witnessed students, faculty, staff, and community partners coming together to support and care for one another.  There have been real accomplishments that would have been significant in normal times and are monumental in COVID times.  For example – this year 330 undergraduate students in Lurie College have earned the dean’s scholar award, a 50% increase over the previous year. Enrollment in our credential programs grew by 40%.  We’ve seen an increase in faculty and staff recognition through awards, grants, and publications. We’ve deepened partnerships and outreach and provided direct support to school districts, community-based organizations, and clinics.

Each and every day I wake up humbled and grateful to be part of a college community that consistently demonstrates care and kindness toward one another and a passionate commitment to our larger mission to prepare and sustain transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders. Thank you!

One year later we are seeing light at the end of the tunnel.  If vaccination continues to progress and infection rates continue to decline, we anticipate that we will be in a very different context by August.  We are planning that most classes will be able to have face-to-face meetings for the Fall 2021 semester.  We are anticipating that most field experiences will be in person at our partner sites.  College offices will be reopening and I anticipate being back on campus in Sweeney Hall full time by August 1.

We recognize that some people may have health concerns that prevent them from returning to campus and will need accommodation.  We also recognize that there have been some real benefits to the online environment and are exploring how effective use of the virtual space can support student learning and strengthen access moving forward.  However, I know that many of us are eager to be able to see people face to face and be in community together.  As you look to the year ahead, please anticipate that we will be returning to campus.  There will likely be the continued need for masking and some social distancing, but it will be so good to be able to see people in person!

Of course, the pandemic isn’t over and I encourage you to continue to wear masks, socially distance, and wash hands.  When you are able, please go get the vaccine.  Santa Clara County is now in phase 1 b of vaccine distribution, with people working in education and childcare eligible to be vaccinated.  This includes all SJSU employees and all Lurie College students who currently are or anticipate returning to school or clinic sites in Spring 2021.  I received my first dose at Levi Stadium last weekend.  The health care workers and volunteers at the stadium were fantastic.  And it felt really good knowing that it represented a huge step toward getting us all back to campus.

Thank you again for all that you do to contribute to the health, well-being, and success of our community.  Lurie College is a family of dedicated, talented, smart, creative, passionate, and capable individuals. Together we have not just survived this past year, we have thrived.  Thank you for being part of our family.  I look forward to seeing you back on campus next semester!

With gratitude —

Heather

Watch Episode 3 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Aminah leads a dialogue around high-stakes standardized testing. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are your initial reactions to this reading? Do you have any examples or questions that came to mind after the reading?
  • How do you think standardized testing practices racial inequality and who do you think it affects the most?
  • How can we support students who are affected by the inequalities of standardized testing, when these practices are still in place?
  • What are possible standardized testing alternatives you would implement/want to see implemented in schools that would achieve racial equality and be accurate measures of a students knowledge? Or is this something we even need to measure?

after reading the article “Meritocracy 2.0: High-Stakes, Standardized Testing as a Racial Project of Neoliberal Multiculturalism” by Wayne Au prior to the episode.

This episode’s call to action: Raise our awareness of how biases in standardized testing affect our students in order to provide support for students who are affected by these biases and find ways to help them succeed.

Join us live for our episode 4 on Friday, March 19, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Join us for Episode 3 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Victor leads a dialogue around decolonization in education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What is your initial reaction towards the reading? Do you have an example or question that came to mind after reading the article?
  • How would you describe the topic of decolonization to a student?
  • What would efforts to decolonize education look like?

after reading the article “Decolonization and Education: Locating Pedagogy and Self at the Interstices in Global Times” by Nina Asher prior to the episode.

This episode’s call to action: The effects of colonization can be experienced by the narrow thinking developed in the human mind. As we return to society, we must be more mindful in how we interact with each other. Decolonization begins with decolonizing one’s own mind.

Join us live for our episode 3 on Friday, March 12, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Watch Episode 1 of Season 2 of the Book Boat

SJSU Lurie College of Education alumni Alejandra Valencia (MA/Multiple Subject Credential Program) and Jocelyn Rodriguez (MA/Multiple Subject Credential Program) have released the first episode of season two of their podcast, The Book Boat! In this episode, Welcome Back Here are Our Current Favorites!, they discuss The ABCs of Black History and What Do You Do With an Idea?

Get connected to future episodes and content on YouTubeAnchorApple PodcastsSpotifyInstagram, or Facebook.

Call for Lurie College Spring 2021 Student Speaker

Video description: Lurie College student Jacqueline Lopez Rivas – BA, Child and Adolescent Development, speaks at our Fall 2020 ceremony.

Lurie College wants to select a graduating student to represent and speak on behalf of the Lurie College community at our Spring 2021 Graduation Celebration ceremony, which will take place on Friday, May 28, at 4pm!  In order to be eligible to apply to become the student speaker, you must also be eligible to graduate.  Your speech can take any number of approaches, but should be original and should resonate with the event attendees, which will be made up of Lurie College students of different academic levels and disciplines, SJSU and Lurie College faculty and staff, and family and friends of all ages and backgrounds.

To apply, submit a 3-5 minute video of you reciting your speech by Sunday, February 28, via this Google form.  More information about graduation and commencement for Lurie College of Education students is available at sjsu.edu/education/graduation.

Watch Episode 1 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

In this episode, you can learn more about our student co-hosts – Abby, Aminah, Ana, Vaishnavi, and Victor – through their name stories. They also share a preview of some of the topics they plan to discuss in more detail later this semester.

The call to action for this episode: Exchange your name story with a family member, friend, colleague, or classmate!

Additional resources shared in this episode include:

Join us live for our next live dialogue on Friday, February 26, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Watch Our Lurie College Scholarships Workshop

Big thanks to Christine Cha from the SJSU Financial Aid and Scholarship Office as well as Child and Adolescent Development faculty Danielle Mead for sharing their insights about the Spring 2021 SJSU and Lurie College scholarships application process for students who will be enrolled at SJSU for the 2021-2022 academic year!  The recording of the workshop is available for viewing below.  The SJSU scholarship application platform will go live in March and the deadline to apply for Lurie College scholarships will be Saturday, May 1.  We will send out an email notification to Lurie College students when they can begin to apply.  In the meantime, please visit sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid for an overview of all Lurie College of Education financial aid opportunities.

Join Lurie College Live for Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a new student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Join us for the live discussion on Friday, February 12, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel – bit.ly/lurie-youtube – to learn from the student co-hosts and get a preview of some of their upcoming dialogues!

  • Abby Almerido – Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Counselor Education

SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Now Meet the Co-Hosts Spring 2021

Welcome to the Spring 2021 Semester, Lurie College of Education Students!

Dear Lurie College Students —

We hope that your first days of class were a success and that you are looking forward to new opportunities and learning experiences during the semester ahead.  We know that taking courses remotely can be challenging and that many of you are also navigating added family responsibilities, work disruptions, and health concerns due to COVID. Our Lurie College community is here for you!

Please reach out to your instructors, academic advisors, and/or program coordinators if you have questions or concerns about your courses.  We also encourage you to connect with our dedicated team in the Lurie College Student Success Center for support and advice on how to access resources on campus.  If you are struggling, you aren’t alone.  Please contact us so that we can connect you with academic supportscounseling servicesfinancial supports, or other resources to help you succeed.

The events of recent weeks have reminded us, once again, of the critical importance of the work that happens in our college.  The hatred, bigotry, nativism, violence, and white supremacy that were on full display during the capitol insurrection on January 6, clearly demonstrate the need for transformative educators, counselors, therapists, and school, college, and community leaders.  Thank you for your courageous decision to commit to academic fields and professional careers that will position you to be agents of change and move us toward a more just, inclusive, and equitable future.

In recent months, our faculty and staff have recommitted ourselves to advancing racial justice within our college.  You can view numerous examples of policy and program changes that we are committed to addressing during the 2020-21 academic year on our college’s Strategic Plan webpage.  We also recently created a webpage with a collection of Antiracism and Racial Justice Resources, which includes articles, podcasts, social media accounts, videos, and much more.

We hope you’ll join us at our upcoming engagement opportunities – such as our Conversation with Radical Monarchs’ Cofounder Anayvette Martinez, our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series, and more – to further advance this work.  We’ll also announce dates for our Deans’ Forums soon so that you can share your input, ideas, critiques, and questions with us directly.

A final word of advice in closing…  Pace yourself!  It promises to be a full semester with lots of time spent in online learning and activities.  Make sure that in the midst of your courses, field experiences, work, and family responsibilities you take time to take care of yourself.  Give yourself permission to turn off the computer and go outside.  Get sleep.  Find time to listen to music, have a good laugh, or just breathe.  We need you in this work for the long term, and that means we need you to take care of yourself.

With gratitude –

Heather Lattimer, Dean
heather.lattimer@sjsu.edu

Marcos Pizarro, Associate Dean

Connect with Lurie College and SJSU

Connect with the SJSU Lurie College of Education @sjsulurie

Get connected to helpful online resources as we prepare for the beginning of the Spring 2021 semester!  Here are some initial Lurie College of Education and SJSU resources:

Lurie College Student Featured in SJSU Washington Square Blog

This story was originally published on the SJSU Washington Square blog by John P. Deever.

San José State University graduate student Janeth Canseco and her two apartment roommates decided they better spend a little extra money for the better quality Wifi.

In the Connie L. Lurie College of Education, Canseco takes five classes and performs two internships, one where she counsels 45 high school students from Del Mar High School and the other where she assists in presentations and observes counselors at Hoover Middle School—meeting with them over the Internet. To pay the bills, she’s a teacher assistant at SJSU’s Associated Students Child Development Center (CDC).

Learning, working, and gazing up that career ladder, trying to choose a foothold—has it ever been harder to do than right now, during a pandemic?

For Canseco, ’19 Psychology, graduate school seemed a good path. She was dubious about it at first, she says. “My advisers and mentors saw potential in me and helped me to apply. Once I got in, it was still very surreal. I didn’t believe it was actually happening. I am a first generation student and the first from my family to attend graduate school.”

Continue Reading…

Apply to Co-Host Emancipatory Education Now for Spring 2021

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices!

Student co-hosts from across Lurie College’s academic programs will meet regularly throughout the spring semester to engage in dialogue about critical topics in education and share those thoughts out with the Lurie College, SJSU, and local community.  Co-hosts will be compensated hourly for their participation and receive a high-quality USB microphone.

All current SJSU Lurie College of Education students are eligible to apply.  Watch the video tutorial below for information about how to complete this Google form by Saturday, January 30, 2021 to apply to become a co-host.

Watch the Fall 2020 Emancipatory Education Now Series at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Lurie College Faculty Discuss ‘Queering Our Campus’

Shoutout to Child and Adolescent Development Department faculty Robert Marx and Counselor Education Department faculty Kyoung Mi Choi, who – with the support of a Lurie College of Education Strategic Plan grant – have established the “Creating an Inclusive Climate: Queering Our Classrooms & Our Campus” initiative, which aims to offer introductory and advanced trainings at the department and college level around topics like pronouns and vocabulary terms, the hidden curriculum in our classes, and creating opportunities for authentic self-expression!  Listen to an overview and update about their initiative below.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Faculty Robert Marx Kyoung Mi Choi Queering Our Classrooms and Campus

“I want to start by giving an overview of what the phrase ‘Queering Our Campus’ means because it’s not a term that is always used and it’s not always immediately understood.  When Kyoung Mi and I put this proposal together, we were thinking about the ways in which our campus – and our college in particular – sometimes unintentionally uphold certain hierarchies and power imbalances.  What it means to queer something is to trouble those hierarchies, to think critically and consciously about the power that’s in place, to think about the dynamics that are always circulating around us, and to think about what we can do to trouble that, to make that more capacious, to make that more inclusive, to make that a little less stable and a little more interesting for those of us who don’t necessarily fit into the norms of our society.”

ICYMI: Fall 2020 Learning Showcase Presentations

The SJSU Lurie College of Education Learning Showcase highlights our undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students’ while they’re on their journeys to becoming transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders under our college’s four priority areas: community-engaged, culturally sustaining, holistic, and interdisciplinary.  Check out some of the presentations from our Department of Counselor Education graduate students, who developed workshops as part of the School-Family-Community Collaboration course. For the class project, students created a synchronous program that was presented on Zoom. In addition, they created asynchronous materials to complement their program.

 

Watch the Lurie College Fall 2020 Graduation Celebration

Our SJSU Lurie College of Education Graduation Celebration took place on Friday, December 18 – watch the recording from the live event above!

  • 14:35 – Video acknowledgment of Spring 2020 Lurie College graduates (alphabetized by last name) and remarks from Dean Heather Lattimer and Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro
  • 26:30 – Remarks from Lurie College Graduation Celebration Speaker, Jacqueline Lopez Rivas (BA, Child & Adolescent Development)
  • 36:14 – Slideshow of collages submitted by graduates (alphabetized by last name)

SJSU has also created a website to recognize all of the Spring 2020 graduates for the entire university. Visit the recognition webpage for Lurie College of Education Spring 2020 graduates.