Watch Our Lurie College Faculty Research Symposium

Watch our Lurie College faculty present their research related to diversity, social justice and culturally sustaining pedagogy!

  • 0:00 – Welcome to our Faculty Research Symposium
  • 0:57 – Opening remarks from Dean Heather Lattimer and Dr. Mark Felton
  • 2:52 – Lyle Lustigman, PhD – Assistant Professor, Communicative Disorders & Sciences – “‘And what were you doing?’ ‘Helping!’ Adult scaffolding in children’s early language development”
  • 26:24 – Nidhi Mahendra PhD – Associate Professor, Communicative Disorders & Sciences – “Spartan Aphasia Research Clinic (SPARC): Where aphasia research, clinical service delivery, and student training meet”

Join us for our next Lurie College Faculty Research Symposium on Thursday, May 6, 12-1pm – RSVP for the Zoom link

  • Allison Briceño, EdD – Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    • “Teaching Pre-service Teachers to Enact Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Shifting Critical Consciousness”
  • Roxana Marachi, PhD – Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    • “Philanthro-Capitalism and Equity Doublespeak: When “Innovation” is Exploitation and Silicon Solutions Fuel Next Level Systemic Racism”

Strategic Plan Spotlight: The Promise Group

At the SJSU Lurie College of Education, we prepare transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders. We do this through an emancipatory approach across our teaching, scholarship, and service.  The Lurie College Promise Group was established to create opportunities for first-generation students and those who are part of the SJSU Spartan Scholars, Guardian Scholars, or Educational Opportunity Program to participate in a year-long personal, academic, and professional development experience.  Lurie College staff member Ana Paz-Rangel recently interviewed staff member Sarah Arreola, who served as a mentor for Child and Adolescent Development student Trini Ruiz.  Read the full interview below.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Promise Group Trini Ruiz Sarah Arreola

Can you tell share some of your mentorship experience through the Promise Group?

When Donna reached out to me, I was excited and nervous at the same time. Nervous because I hoped I’d meet the Student Success Center’s expectations. The exciting part was mentoring a Lurie College student and being able to support them.

My mentee’s name was Trini. She was delightful, had a certain energy, and I saw that she was motivated. Each time we met, I started with the question “what can I help you with today?” One day, Trini was nervous to take the CBEST and to address that, we applied together.

We also discussed Trini’s long-term goals. One time, Trini discovered she needed to take an additional class, but didn’t have room in her schedule or the budget for a class at SJSU. We ultimately found a solution by exploring similar courses at Evergreen College. Trini wasn’t aware of the process for enrolling at a community college so I assisted her through this process.

Were there any challenges working with your mentee?

Trini was first gen and didn’t have support from her family around approaching difficult situations at the university level. For example, if you’re struggling in a class, how do you approach the faculty? Trini started attending office hours and became comfortable initiating that. The challenge was not having someone show her how to navigate the university system. I felt very fortunate to be that person for her.

Did your mentee have any “wins” during her time with the Promise Group?

One of Trini’s biggest wins was being offered two jobs before graduating. Trini prepared so much. I helped her prepare for her interviews and she ultimately accepted a position with the Boys & Girls Club as Director of Teen Services.

Another win for Trini was the relationships she developed with other mentees and with me as her mentor. She was able to establish close relationships that could last a lifetime. To this day, she and I are still in touch. I think it was a win to not only have me as a mentor to assist her with her college experience, but also to have colleagues going through the same experiences.

How did this experience impact you? Did you have a mentor when you were in school, either as an undergraduate or graduate student? Do you see mentorship differently having been a mentor yourself now?

As an undergrad, I didn’t have a mentor or the guidance I wish I had. However, I had it more as a graduate student as well as with my co-workers, my sister, family, and my managers. Having experienced both, not having one and then so many, I definitely see the benefits of undergrads having a mentor.
For these reasons, if anyone in our college, staff or faculty, is offered the opportunity to be a mentor by Donna, I would recommend seriously considering it because it opened so many doors for me. Having had this experience of giving back to the college has given me more purpose.

Attend Our Lurie College Faculty Symposia

Join our SJSU Lurie College of Education faculty as they present their research related to diversity, social justice and culturally sustaining pedagogy!

SJSU Lurie College of Education Spring 2021 Faculty Research Symposium 1 Lyle Lustigman Nidhi Mahendra

Monday, April 19, 1-2pm, RSVP for the Zoom link

  • Lyle Lustigman, PhD – Assistant Professor, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
    • “‘And what were you doing?’ ‘Helping!’ Adult scaffolding in children’s early language development”
  • Nidhi Mahendra PhD – Associate Professor, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
    • “Spartan Aphasia Research Clinic (SPARC): Where aphasia research, clinical service delivery, and student training meet”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Spring 2021 Faculty Research Symposium 2 Allison Briceno Roxana Marachi

Thursday, May 6, 12-1pm, RSVP for the Zoom link

  • Allison Briceño, EdD – Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    • “Teaching Pre-service Teachers to Enact Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Shifting Critical Consciousness”
  • Roxana Marachi, PhD – Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    • “Philanthro-Capitalism and Equity Doublespeak: When “Innovation” is Exploitation and Silicon Solutions Fuel Next Level Systemic Racism”

Join us for Episode 6 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Ana leads a dialogue around antiracist education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What was your initial reaction to the articles and the video? Did anything surprise you?
  • How would you define antiracist education?
  • What do you think are antiracist strategies for teachers? Do you agree with the ones presented in the video?
  • The first article discusses the need to go beyond ethnic studies courses and include anti-racist education in all subjects. How do you think schools and districts can accomplish this?
  • The second article discusses Trump-era policies that sought to prevent schools from teaching critical race theory and federally funded agencies from offering diversity training. While this is no longer an issue under the Biden administration, should we be concerned about such things happening in the future? What do you think is the likelihood of a future administration trying to enact such policies, and is there anything we can do about it in the meantime?
  • Can you identify any challenges to implementing strategies for antiracist education? How can we overcome these?
  • Why is antiracist education important to you? Why do you think it’s important that schools commit to antiracist education?

after reading the articles “California schools, universities condemn anti-Asian attacks, offer support to students” by Carolyn Jones and Ashley Smith and “Diversity Work, Interrupted” by Colleen Flaherty and watching the video “6 Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” by Edutopia.

This episode’s call to action: Watch the video “Six Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” and try to implement at least one of those strategies in your classroom. Additionally, since many of these ideas are applicable beyond the classroom, think about what it would look like for you to implement such practices in your daily life. What can you do to combat racism in your community?

Additional Antiracism and Racial Justice resources are available on the Lurie College website at sjsu.edu/education/community/antiracism.  All of the recordings for this series are available at http://sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Lurie College Hosting 3rd Annual Free STEM+C Teacher Institute

Building upon the success of the previous two summers, Lurie College is planning to host its third annual free STEM+C Teacher Insitute from Monday, June 7 – Friday, July 23.  Our institute enables teacher candidates and current teachers to build their STEM+C content knowledge and earn a math or science foundational-level credential, which allows those who complete the institute to teach middle school math or science. It can be added to a multiple or single subject credential by successfully completing the methods class included in this summer program and passing the corresponding CSET subtest(s).

There is no cost to participants for the coursework, content seminars, or computer science workshop. Lurie College will also cover math or science CSET registration costs for SJSU students and alumni who successfully complete the summer program.  Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/stem-institute to listen to testimonials from the Summer 2020 Institute, learn more about the math pathway, science pathway, and computer science seminar, and apply by Monday, May 10, for priority consideration.

Institute for Emancipatory Education Launch and Executive Director Search

SJSU Lurie College of Education Institute for Emancipatory Education Cover Image

After multiple years of discussions, activities, and iterations, what was formerly known as the Future of Learning Initiative and the Emancipatory Education Initiative has now formally received approval by SJSU to become the Institute for Emancipatory Education (IEE)!

The next step in launching our IEE is to commence a search for a founding Executive Director.  The position has been posted on the SJSU Jobs website and the priority review of applications will begin after Tuesday, April 27.  Please share this opportunity with anyone who you believe has the interest, experience, and passion to advance the goals of our IEE.

SJSU and Lurie College Broadband Access Report Highlighted in News

In 2020, Lurie College faculty Luis PozaEduardo Muñoz-Muñoz, and Tammie Visintainer collaborated with SJSU faculty Ahoura ZandiatashbarCalifornia Assemblymember Robert Rivas, and the Watsonville High School ECHO Leadership Academy to better understand the impact of known gaps in broadband internet access across California’s 30th Congressional District and published a report of their findings.

Their report recently gained some visibility when it was highlighted in the Monterey County Weekly as well as on KCBS radio!  It is also being utilized to inform policy proposals at the state level such as Assembly Bill 14.

Lurie College Launches New Undergraduate Minor

Our new SJSU undergraduate Minor in Transformative Leadership is an interdisciplinary approach to leadership development through engagement with anti-racist pedagogies and practices. By building a foundation and framework for developing an intersectional lens throughout this program, students develop their leadership goals around becoming transformative agents of change in their communities through meaningful, culturally affirming, and sustaining practices.

Located in the SJSU Lurie College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership, the Transformative Leadership Minor prepares SJSU undergraduate students of all academic backgrounds to enact meaningful change in local, state, and national settings. To learn more and RSVP for our upcoming info session on Tuesday, April 20, at 12pm, visit sjsu.edu/edleadership/academics/undergraduate-minor

Student Spotlights: Julia Duggs, Jenna Kunz, and Angelica Lopez

The SJSU Lurie College of Education has recently launched an Ethnic Studies Teacher Residency program to collaborate with local school districts and create an opportunity for our teacher candidates to gain valuable professional experience and ongoing professional development as they prepare to become Ethnic Studies teachers. Learn about our 2020-2021 cohort of Ethnic Studies Teacher Residency students – Julia Duggs, Jenna Kunz, and Angelica Lopez – as they share their experiences in the residency program and how it has shaped them going forward!

  • 0:00​ – Meet Julia, Jenna, and Angelica
  • 0:56 – When did you know that you wanted to pursue education as a career field?
  • 4:02 – How is the Ethnic Studies residency program enabling you to make progress towards your hopes, dreams, and goals?
  • 8:03 – Can you share an example or a story of a valuable or transformative experience that you’ve had within the residency program?
  • 11:20 – Can you share an example or a story about how you’ve applied your experiences from the residency program outside of the program?
  • 14:03 – Which of your professors thus far has impacted you the most? What has made them so impactful?
  • 17:52 – How has 2020 shaped your identity, philosophy, and pedagogy as you progress through your academic program and career?
  • 22:10 – What’s one piece of advice you have for anyone who is considering the Ethnic Studies residency program?

#IBelongAtLurieCollege | Alejandra Romo

What provides you with a sense of belonging at Lurie College?  Is it your drive to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader?  A faculty member, advisor, your friends or student groups?  The events and culture?  Share with us on Instagram by tagging @sjsulurie and using the hashtag #IBelongAtLurieCollege in your caption or email us at brian.cheungdooley@sjsu.edu so we can share uplifting stories from our community.  Learn about Alejandra Romo, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences undergraduate student, and what provides her with a sense of belonging!

“Lurie College has been a great place to call home here at SJSU because of the strong sense of community I always feel around me.  It has opened many doors to many opportunities, connections, and resources and for that I am extremely grateful.  I have broken out of my shell and owe that to my program and Lurie College for making every student feel like they’re capable of great things.”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Communicative Disorders & Sciences Student Alejandra Romo

Apply for Lurie College Grants

Student Research Awards | Apply by Mon., Apr. 12

  • The Lurie College of Education is pleased to offer up to three student-research awards for the 2021-2022 academic year to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project.  These awards are designed to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major.  Students can receive an award of $2,000 per semester and $4,000 a year.  Apply for a research award via this Google form.

Student Research Supplies Grant | Apply by Mon., May 3

  • Undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students are eligible to apply for up to one $200 grant per fiscal year (July 1 – May 31) towards expenses for research supplies to conduct their academic research.  A limited amount of funding is available.  To apply for a Lurie College Student Research Supplies Grant, please download and complete this brief form (PDF).

Strategic Plan Grant | Apply by Mon., Mar. 29

  • We are pleased to announce the request for proposals (RFP) for our 2021-22 Lurie College Strategic Plan Seed Grants.  Lurie College’s Strategic Plan Seed Grants are designed to advance the priorities articulated in our strategic plan.   All faculty, staff, and students in our Lurie College community are eligible to apply for seed grant funding.  Initial draft proposals are due Monday, March 29.  Submit your grant proposal by completing this Google form.  If you have questions about these grant opportunities, please email lurie-steering-group@sjsu.edu.

Hardship Grant

  • Lurie College has a limited amount of grant funds available to support its students who have experienced an unforeseen financial hardship that will prevent them from continuing their enrollment at Lurie College and SJSU.  If you are a Lurie College undergraduate, graduate, credential, or doctoral student who has experienced this type of hardship, please complete this brief Google form so that a Lurie College advisor can contact you to discuss this option as well as other possible campus resources.

#IBelongAtLurieCollege | Dani Umana

What provides you with a sense of belonging at Lurie College?  Is it your drive to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader?  A faculty member, advisor, your friends or student groups?  The events and culture?  Share with us on Instagram by tagging @sjsulurie and using the hashtag #IBelongAtLurieCollege in your caption or email us at brian.cheungdooley@sjsu.edu so we can share uplifting stories from our community.  Learn about Dani Umana, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences undergraduate student, and what provides her with a sense of belonging!

“Although this school year has been entirely remote, I have had amazing experiences as a Spartan transfer student.  The caring, supportive professors and friends I’ve met through school have made a lasting impact on my personal & academic development.  Signing up for the Chicanx/Latinx Student Leadership Retreat and the Lurie College Learning Showcase have helped me get to know several faculty members & students outside of class and fostered a sense of community as well.”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Communicative Disorders & Sciences Student Dani Umana

Lurie College Emeritus Dean Publishes Opinion Piece

Shoutout to former SJSU Lurie College Dean, Susan Meyers, who published an op-ed in the San José Spotlight to advocate for ethnic studies curriculum and shine a spotlight on the current partnership between Lurie College and Overfelt High School to support the implementation of ethnic studies courses and curriculum.  Read the full opinion piece at bit.ly/3mlwpB2.

San Jose Spotlight SJSU Lurie College of Education Susan Meyers Ethnic Studies Op-Ed Peter Ortiz Photo

#IBelongAtLurieCollege | Desirae McNeil

What provides you with a sense of belonging at Lurie College?  Is it your drive to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader?  A faculty member, advisor, your friends or student groups?  The events and culture?  Share with us on Instagram by tagging @sjsulurie and using the hashtag #IBelongAtLurieCollege in your caption or email us at brian.cheungdooley@sjsu.edu so we can share uplifting stories from our community.  Learn about Desirae McNeil, Department of Counselor Education graduate student, and what provides her with a sense of belonging!

“Here at Lurie College of Education, there are numerous opportunities to get involved on campus and in the community through student organization and leadership roles. Being involved in student organizations and utilizing my resources has provided me with a sense of belonging here at Lurie College.”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Counselor Education Student Desirae McNeil

Student Spotlights: Alaysia Palmer, Paulina Medina, and Vinson Vũ

The SJSU Lurie College of Education provides research awards to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major. Learn about our recent student research award recipients – Alaysia Palmer (Child & Adolescent Development), Paulina Medina (Communicative Disorders & Sciences), and Vinson Vũ (Child & Adolescent Development) as they discuss their experiences with their research projects, faculty mentors, and more.

  • 0:00 – Meet Alaysia, Paulina, and Vinson
  • 0:29 – Description of research projects
  • 4:27 – Relationships with faculty mentors
  • 7:05 – How the research award experiences have shaped them
  • 10:13 – Advice for future applicants

The Lurie College of Education is pleased to offer up to three student-research awards for the 2021-2022 academic year to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project.  These awards are designed to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major.  Students can receive an award of $2,000 per semester and $4,000 a year.  Apply for a research award by Monday, April 12, at sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid.

Lurie College Faculty Receive SJSU Level Up Grant

Congratulations to Child and Adolescent Development faculty Ellen Middaugh and Teacher Education faculty Mark Felton, who have received an SJSU Level Up Grant for their project “Enfranchised: Using social media to foster dialogue and civic empowerment.”  This grant will provide internal resources for conducting research that will ideally lead to future external funding to conduct additional research.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Faculty Ellen Middaugh Mark Felton

SJSU President Papazian Shines a Spotlight on Lurie College Emancipatory Education Initiative

This story, “Emancipatory learning approach helping students ‘reap the full benefit of an empowering education,'” was originally published on SJSU President Papazian’s blog.

Recently I had the opportunity to offer welcome remarks at the kickoff event for our Lurie College of Education’s new Emancipatory Education Speaker Series, which focuses on a “post-COVID-19 education system.” What an important and timely initiative!

After listening to the first speaker, Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings, I quickly realized how well-aligned this series is with San José State values, our academic goals and our Transformation 2030 strategic plan. Emancipatory education, in fact, is an approach that begins to put into practice some of the general education changes that we at SJSU have been discussing these past few years.

Read more…

Watch Our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

What should education look like post-COVID? How do we get there?

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. The SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Speaker Series features nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who are sharing their visions for a post-COVID education system.

This speaker series event featured Dr. E.J.R. David – professor of psychology at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. Watch this video to listen to Dr. David discuss “Emancipatory Education: Healing the Damages of a Sick World”

  • 0:00​ Welcome to our speaker series
  • 4:17​ Introduction of Dr. E.J.R. David
  • 6:34​ Remarks from Dr. E.J.R. David
  • 42:28​ Q&A with Dr. E.J.R. David

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to watch all of the recordings from our speaker series.

Watch Episode 4 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Vaishnavi leads a dialogue around inequality and access in education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are some examples of initiatives at the classroom, school/university, state, or federal level that have been effective at creating a more equitable education for low income students? What are some examples of ineffective initiatives or missed opportunities?
  • How do you think race plays a factor in schooling in low income communities? The videos provided some examples. Did anything stand out to you?
  • In the Crash Course video, we saw that higher income parents are more likely to spend time with their children reading books and strengthening their cognitive skills. These higher income children enter school with more knowledge compared to a child from a lower income household. How can we support these young children early on to ensure that they are successful throughout their school journey?
  • FAFSA is a great way for students to get grants and money. However, do you think FAFSA is a simple process for low income families? Why or why not?
  • After reading the article on the factors that count against low income students in the college admissions process, what were your thoughts/initial reactions? Do you think that students that attend schools with extremely low budgets will always have no hope towards attending good colleges since they don’t have impressive extracurriculars or classes?

after reading the article “5 Ways Elite-College Admissions Shut Out Poor Kids” by Anya Kamenetz and watching the videos “Higher Education for Low-Income Students,” and “Schools & Social Inequality: Crash Course Sociology #41.”

This episode’s call to action: After our discussion, think about how San Jose State University aids low income students to continue attending classes. Find one resource that SJSU provides to support these students. Do you think this resource is helpful? Is there a resource that you would recommend to SJSU instead?

Join us live for our episode 5 on Friday, April 9, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Watch Episode 3 of Season 2 of the Book Boat

SJSU Lurie College of Education alumni Alejandra Valencia (MA/Multiple Subject Credential Program) and Jocelyn Rodriguez (MA/Multiple Subject Credential Program) are back with their second episode of season two of their podcast, The Book Boat! In this episode, Women’s History Month!, they discuss Herstory: 50 Women and Girls Who Shook Up the World and The ABCs of AOC: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez from A to Z.

Get connected to future episodes and content on YouTubeAnchorApple PodcastsSpotifyInstagram, or Facebook.

Watch and Attend Our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

What should education look like post-COVID? How do we get there?

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. The SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Speaker Series features nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who are sharing their visions for a post-COVID education system.

Watch the recording from our speaker series event on Friday, March 12, which included a Latinas Leading Schools panel discussion with Dr. Fabiola Bagula, Dr. Rebeca Burcaiga, Dr. Melissa Martinez, Dr. Sylvia Mendez-Morse, and Ana Tavares.

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to register for our final speaker series event:

  • Friday, March 19, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. E.J.R. David, Dr. Saili Kulkarni, Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia, and Leroy Moore

Watch Episode 3 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Aminah leads a dialogue around high-stakes standardized testing. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are your initial reactions to this reading? Do you have any examples or questions that came to mind after the reading?
  • How do you think standardized testing practices racial inequality and who do you think it affects the most?
  • How can we support students who are affected by the inequalities of standardized testing, when these practices are still in place?
  • What are possible standardized testing alternatives you would implement/want to see implemented in schools that would achieve racial equality and be accurate measures of a students knowledge? Or is this something we even need to measure?

after reading the article “Meritocracy 2.0: High-Stakes, Standardized Testing as a Racial Project of Neoliberal Multiculturalism” by Wayne Au prior to the episode.

This episode’s call to action: Raise our awareness of how biases in standardized testing affect our students in order to provide support for students who are affected by these biases and find ways to help them succeed.

Join us live for our episode 4 on Friday, March 19, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Strategic Plan Spotlight: Early Childhood Connections

At the SJSU Lurie College of Education, we prepare transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders through an emancipatory approach across our teaching, scholarship, and service and with a focus on being community-engaged, culturally sustaining, interdisciplinary, and holistic.  Learn more about what this looks like in practice from Child & Adolescent Development faculty Maria Fusaro as she discusses our Early Childhood Institute and Early Childhood Connections initiative below.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Early Childhood Institute Emily Slusser Andrea Golloher Maria Fusaro

As a faculty member in ChAD (Child and Adolescent Development), I’m privileged to work with many dedicated students as part of their educational journey.  Students bring rich insights from their experiences in their own families and from work and volunteer experiences in their communities to my classes on infant/toddler development.

While classes are a critical part of the college experience, college is also a prime time to make personal and professional connections, broaden our horizons, dream bigger dreams, and persist through new struggles.  When I began my journey as a first-generation college student, I had optimistic but vague perspectives about what higher education was all about.  While I cannot fully appreciate what it means to be a college student in the era of COVID, I do recognize the value of having intentional opportunities for connection and dialogue, especially to recover some of the informal connection that we’ve lost to this virus.

In 2019, I worked with my colleagues Emily Slusser and Andrea Golloher, from ChAD and Special Education, to launch the Early Childhood Institute (ECI).  At its heart, ECI is a hub for all things early childhood on campus, including research, training, and advocacy.  We create opportunities for dialogue to better meet the needs of young children and their families in ways that connect research and practice.

As part of our work, and with the support of Lurie College Strategic Plan funding, ECI established a program called Early Childhood Connections (ECC). ECC focuses on building community and supporting the professional growth of BA and MA students and recent alumni across disciplines in pursuit of careers involving young children.  During each of our ongoing sessions, presenters from SJSU and ECI’s community partners are invited to lead discussions on a range of topics.  We’ve learned about the landscape for infant/toddler intervention in California, strategies for engaging with diverse families, and ways in which early childhood teachers (generalists) can work hand in hand with early childhood specialists. We are particularly proud that some of our presenters are SJSU alum, returning to share their wisdom with the next generation of early childhood professionals.

ECC only exists because of our participants and their voices are critical for shaping the program.  A huge shoutout goes to Thao Ngyuen (ChAD BA, 2021), who has served as our dedicated student coordinator throughout our first year of program design and implementation.  Our team, which also includes Isabel Vallejo and Donna Bee-Gates, developed the bones of the program, and participants have weighed in on our meeting themes and ways to stay connected outside of our planned meetings.  ECC is one part of each of their unique SJSU experiences, but it is one that we hope will carry on long into the future, as they continue their professional journey and stay connected to ECI along the way.

Watch Episode 2 of Season 2 of the Book Boat

SJSU Lurie College of Education alumni Alejandra Valencia (MA/Multiple Subject Credential Program) and Jocelyn Rodriguez (MA/Multiple Subject Credential Program) are back with their second episode of season two of their podcast, The Book Boat! In this episode, My Tiny Temper, they have a conversation with the My Tiny Temper Authors, Christopher Fequiere and his son Oliver!

Get connected to future episodes and content on YouTubeAnchorApple PodcastsSpotifyInstagram, or Facebook.

Watch and Attend Our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

What should education look like post-COVID? How do we get there?

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. The SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Speaker Series features nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who are sharing their visions for a post-COVID education system.

Watch the recording from our speaker series event on Friday, March 5:

  • Sec. John King – President and CEO of The Education Trust – Reversing the practices of providing the least educational support to those who need it most
    • 8:42​ – Introduction of Sec. John King by Dr. Jennifer Husbands
    • 10:50​ – Remarks from Sec. John King
    • 28:44​ – Q&A with Sec. John King
  • Dr. Leslie Gonzales – associate professor in the Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Learning unit at Michigan State University – “Towards Epistemic Justice: Unlearning, Relearning, and Refusal in the Academy”
    • 50:40​ – Introduction of Dr. Leslie Gonzales by Dr. María Ledesma
    • 52:01​ – Remarks from Dr. Leslie Gonzales
    • 1:19:00 – Q&A with Dr. Leslie Gonzales

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to register for our upcoming speaker series events:

  • Friday, March 12, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. Fabiola Bagula, Dr. Rebeca Burcaiga, Dr. Melissa Martinez, Dr. Sylvia Mendez-Morse, Ana Tavares, and Dr. Tara Yosso
  • Friday, March 19, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. E.J.R. David, Dr. Saili Kulkarni, Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia, and Leroy Moore