Attend Our Spring 2021 Lurie College Learning Showcase

SJSU Lurie College of Education Learning Showcase

Our semi-annual SJSU Lurie College of Education Learning Showcase highlights our undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students while they’re on their journeys to becoming transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders under our college’s four priority areas: community-engaged, culturally sustaining, holistic, and interdisciplinary.

Our Spring 2021 Learning Showcase will take place virtually on Friday, May 14, from 4-6:30pm and will include presentations and panels focused on topics such as:

  • Action Research/Intervention for Students with Disabilities
  • Communication, Covid & Complications
  • Co-Teaching/Inclusion Research
  • Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Perspectives in Research
  • Emancipatory Education Now
  • Perceptions and Special Education
  • Systematic Review of Interventions and Supports for Students with Disabilities
  • Understanding the Importance of Intentional Breaks to Relax, Reflect, and Refocus
  • What it’s like to be a ChAD Student Ambassador

To learn more about each of the sessions and RSVP to attend, visit sjsu.edu/education/showcase.

Lurie College Hosting 3rd Annual Free STEM+C Teacher Institute

Building upon the success of the previous two summers, Lurie College is planning to host its third annual free STEM+C Teacher Insitute from Monday, June 7 – Friday, July 23.  Our institute enables teacher candidates and current teachers to build their STEM+C content knowledge and earn a math or science foundational-level credential, which allows those who complete the institute to teach middle school math or science. It can be added to a multiple or single subject credential by successfully completing the methods class included in this summer program and passing the corresponding CSET subtest(s).

There is no cost to participants for the coursework, content seminars, or computer science workshop. Lurie College will also cover math or science CSET registration costs for SJSU students and alumni who successfully complete the summer program.  Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/stem-institute to listen to testimonials from the Summer 2020 Institute, learn more about the math pathway, science pathway, and computer science seminar, and apply by Monday, May 10, for priority consideration.

Watch Our Faculty Research Symposium

Watch our Lurie College faculty present their research related to diversity, social justice and culturally sustaining pedagogy!

  • 0:00 – Welcome to our Faculty Research Symposium
  • 0:42 – Opening remarks from Dean Heather Lattimer
  • 1:55 – Allison Briceño, EdD – Assistant Professor, Teacher Education – “Teaching Pre-service Teachers to Enact Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Shifting Critical Consciousness”
  • 27:48 – Roxana Marachi, PhD – Associate Professor, Teacher Education – “Philanthro-Capitalism and Equity Doublespeak: When ‘Innovation’ is Exploitation and Silicon Solutions Fuel Next Level Systemic Racism”

Lurie College Faculty Receives SJSU Early Career Investigator Award

Congratulations to Child and Adolescent Development faculty Ellen Middaugh, who was selected by the SJSU Office of Research and Innovation to receive the Early Career Investigator Award!  Dr. Middaugh and her team of Student Research Assistants – George Franco, Kristen Huey, and Kristina Smith – research how youth utilize social media platforms to empower their voices, promote community and encourage civic engagement.  Watch the recognition video below that was shown during the SJSU Celebration of Research.

Watch Episode 6 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Abby leads a dialogue around stereotype threat. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What resonated with you about this TEDTalk? Did anything surprise you or challenge your previous ways of thinking?
  • We started today’s sharing some of our layers of our identity. As you consumed Adichie’s talk on Single Stories, what single stories were coming up for you about yourself?
  • In the TEDTalk, Adichie references an Igbo word: nkali (9:37) – “to be greater than another.” She goes on to say that single stories exist because there are those who have the power to write the definitive stories of a person or group of people. Our media have the power of telling the story of people. What single stories do you see in the media?
  • Why is it important to understand the single stories of ourselves and others? Why is it important for those in education to identify when single stories exist?
  • We also read an article on some ways to address stereotype threat in the classroom. What are your thoughts on those suggestions? Is it enough? What else could be done?

after watching “The danger of a single story” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and reading “How Teachers Can Reduce Stereotype Threat in the Classroom.”

This episode’s call to action: How are you purposefully providing opportunities for those you influence and who influence you to give you a more complete story of who they are? Let’s all build bridges across differences one story at a time.

All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now.  Join us for our final episode on Friday, May 14, at 5:15pm at the Lurie College Learning Showcase.  More information coming soon at sjsu.edu/education/showcase.

Attend Our Lurie College Faculty Symposia

Join our SJSU Lurie College of Education faculty as they present their research related to diversity, social justice and culturally sustaining pedagogy!

SJSU Lurie College of Education Spring 2021 Faculty Research Symposium 2 Allison Briceno Roxana Marachi

Thursday, May 6, 12-1pm, RSVP for the Zoom link

  • Allison Briceño, EdD – Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    • “Teaching Pre-service Teachers to Enact Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Shifting Critical Consciousness”
  • Roxana Marachi, PhD – Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    • “Philanthro-Capitalism and Equity Doublespeak: When “Innovation” is Exploitation and Silicon Solutions Fuel Next Level Systemic Racism”

SJSU Lurie College of Education Spring 2021 Faculty Research Symposium 1 Lyle Lustigman Nidhi Mahendra

Monday, April 19, 1-2pm, RSVP for the Zoom link

  • Lyle Lustigman, PhD – Assistant Professor, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
    • “‘And what were you doing?’ ‘Helping!’ Adult scaffolding in children’s early language development”
  • Nidhi Mahendra PhD – Associate Professor, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
    • “Spartan Aphasia Research Clinic (SPARC): Where aphasia research, clinical service delivery, and student training meet”

Join us for Episode 6 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Ana leads a dialogue around antiracist education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What was your initial reaction to the articles and the video? Did anything surprise you?
  • How would you define antiracist education?
  • What do you think are antiracist strategies for teachers? Do you agree with the ones presented in the video?
  • The first article discusses the need to go beyond ethnic studies courses and include anti-racist education in all subjects. How do you think schools and districts can accomplish this?
  • The second article discusses Trump-era policies that sought to prevent schools from teaching critical race theory and federally funded agencies from offering diversity training. While this is no longer an issue under the Biden administration, should we be concerned about such things happening in the future? What do you think is the likelihood of a future administration trying to enact such policies, and is there anything we can do about it in the meantime?
  • Can you identify any challenges to implementing strategies for antiracist education? How can we overcome these?
  • Why is antiracist education important to you? Why do you think it’s important that schools commit to antiracist education?

after reading the articles “California schools, universities condemn anti-Asian attacks, offer support to students” by Carolyn Jones and Ashley Smith and “Diversity Work, Interrupted” by Colleen Flaherty and watching the video “6 Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” by Edutopia.

This episode’s call to action: Watch the video “Six Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” and try to implement at least one of those strategies in your classroom. Additionally, since many of these ideas are applicable beyond the classroom, think about what it would look like for you to implement such practices in your daily life. What can you do to combat racism in your community?

Additional Antiracism and Racial Justice resources are available on the Lurie College website at sjsu.edu/education/community/antiracism.  All of the recordings for this series are available at http://sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Institute for Emancipatory Education Launch and Executive Director Search

SJSU Lurie College of Education Institute for Emancipatory Education Cover Image

After multiple years of discussions, activities, and iterations, what was formerly known as the Future of Learning Initiative and the Emancipatory Education Initiative has now formally received approval by SJSU to become the Institute for Emancipatory Education (IEE)!

The next step in launching our IEE is to commence a search for a founding Executive Director.  The position has been posted on the SJSU Jobs website and the priority review of applications will begin after Tuesday, April 27.  Please share this opportunity with anyone who you believe has the interest, experience, and passion to advance the goals of our IEE.

Lurie College Launches New Undergraduate Minor

Our new SJSU undergraduate Minor in Transformative Leadership is an interdisciplinary approach to leadership development through engagement with anti-racist pedagogies and practices. By building a foundation and framework for developing an intersectional lens throughout this program, students develop their leadership goals around becoming transformative agents of change in their communities through meaningful, culturally affirming, and sustaining practices.

Located in the SJSU Lurie College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership, the Transformative Leadership Minor prepares SJSU undergraduate students of all academic backgrounds to enact meaningful change in local, state, and national settings. To learn more and RSVP for our upcoming info session on Tuesday, April 20, at 12pm, visit sjsu.edu/edleadership/academics/undergraduate-minor

Student Spotlights: Alaysia Palmer, Paulina Medina, and Vinson Vũ

The SJSU Lurie College of Education provides research awards to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major. Learn about our recent student research award recipients – Alaysia Palmer (Child & Adolescent Development), Paulina Medina (Communicative Disorders & Sciences), and Vinson Vũ (Child & Adolescent Development) as they discuss their experiences with their research projects, faculty mentors, and more.

  • 0:00 – Meet Alaysia, Paulina, and Vinson
  • 0:29 – Description of research projects
  • 4:27 – Relationships with faculty mentors
  • 7:05 – How the research award experiences have shaped them
  • 10:13 – Advice for future applicants

The Lurie College of Education is pleased to offer up to three student-research awards for the 2021-2022 academic year to support students, mentored by a faculty mentor, on a student-initiated research project.  These awards are designed to support student-faculty collaboration on an on-going or proposed research project related to the student’s major.  Students can receive an award of $2,000 per semester and $4,000 a year.  Apply for a research award by Monday, April 12, at sjsu.edu/education/financial-aid.

Lurie College Faculty Receive SJSU Level Up Grant

Congratulations to Child and Adolescent Development faculty Ellen Middaugh and Teacher Education faculty Mark Felton, who have received an SJSU Level Up Grant for their project “Enfranchised: Using social media to foster dialogue and civic empowerment.”  This grant will provide internal resources for conducting research that will ideally lead to future external funding to conduct additional research.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Faculty Ellen Middaugh Mark Felton

SJSU President Papazian Shines a Spotlight on Lurie College Emancipatory Education Initiative

This story, “Emancipatory learning approach helping students ‘reap the full benefit of an empowering education,'” was originally published on SJSU President Papazian’s blog.

Recently I had the opportunity to offer welcome remarks at the kickoff event for our Lurie College of Education’s new Emancipatory Education Speaker Series, which focuses on a “post-COVID-19 education system.” What an important and timely initiative!

After listening to the first speaker, Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings, I quickly realized how well-aligned this series is with San José State values, our academic goals and our Transformation 2030 strategic plan. Emancipatory education, in fact, is an approach that begins to put into practice some of the general education changes that we at SJSU have been discussing these past few years.

Read more…

Watch Our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

What should education look like post-COVID? How do we get there?

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. The SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Speaker Series features nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who are sharing their visions for a post-COVID education system.

This speaker series event featured Dr. E.J.R. David – professor of psychology at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. Watch this video to listen to Dr. David discuss “Emancipatory Education: Healing the Damages of a Sick World”

  • 0:00​ Welcome to our speaker series
  • 4:17​ Introduction of Dr. E.J.R. David
  • 6:34​ Remarks from Dr. E.J.R. David
  • 42:28​ Q&A with Dr. E.J.R. David

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to watch all of the recordings from our speaker series.

Watch Episode 4 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Vaishnavi leads a dialogue around inequality and access in education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are some examples of initiatives at the classroom, school/university, state, or federal level that have been effective at creating a more equitable education for low income students? What are some examples of ineffective initiatives or missed opportunities?
  • How do you think race plays a factor in schooling in low income communities? The videos provided some examples. Did anything stand out to you?
  • In the Crash Course video, we saw that higher income parents are more likely to spend time with their children reading books and strengthening their cognitive skills. These higher income children enter school with more knowledge compared to a child from a lower income household. How can we support these young children early on to ensure that they are successful throughout their school journey?
  • FAFSA is a great way for students to get grants and money. However, do you think FAFSA is a simple process for low income families? Why or why not?
  • After reading the article on the factors that count against low income students in the college admissions process, what were your thoughts/initial reactions? Do you think that students that attend schools with extremely low budgets will always have no hope towards attending good colleges since they don’t have impressive extracurriculars or classes?

after reading the article “5 Ways Elite-College Admissions Shut Out Poor Kids” by Anya Kamenetz and watching the videos “Higher Education for Low-Income Students,” and “Schools & Social Inequality: Crash Course Sociology #41.”

This episode’s call to action: After our discussion, think about how San Jose State University aids low income students to continue attending classes. Find one resource that SJSU provides to support these students. Do you think this resource is helpful? Is there a resource that you would recommend to SJSU instead?

Join us live for our episode 5 on Friday, April 9, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Watch and Attend Our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

What should education look like post-COVID? How do we get there?

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. The SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Speaker Series features nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who are sharing their visions for a post-COVID education system.

Watch the recording from our speaker series event on Friday, March 12, which included a Latinas Leading Schools panel discussion with Dr. Fabiola Bagula, Dr. Rebeca Burcaiga, Dr. Melissa Martinez, Dr. Sylvia Mendez-Morse, and Ana Tavares.

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to register for our final speaker series event:

  • Friday, March 19, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. E.J.R. David, Dr. Saili Kulkarni, Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia, and Leroy Moore

Watch Episode 3 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Aminah leads a dialogue around high-stakes standardized testing. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What are your initial reactions to this reading? Do you have any examples or questions that came to mind after the reading?
  • How do you think standardized testing practices racial inequality and who do you think it affects the most?
  • How can we support students who are affected by the inequalities of standardized testing, when these practices are still in place?
  • What are possible standardized testing alternatives you would implement/want to see implemented in schools that would achieve racial equality and be accurate measures of a students knowledge? Or is this something we even need to measure?

after reading the article “Meritocracy 2.0: High-Stakes, Standardized Testing as a Racial Project of Neoliberal Multiculturalism” by Wayne Au prior to the episode.

This episode’s call to action: Raise our awareness of how biases in standardized testing affect our students in order to provide support for students who are affected by these biases and find ways to help them succeed.

Join us live for our episode 4 on Friday, March 19, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Strategic Plan Spotlight: Early Childhood Connections

At the SJSU Lurie College of Education, we prepare transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders through an emancipatory approach across our teaching, scholarship, and service and with a focus on being community-engaged, culturally sustaining, interdisciplinary, and holistic.  Learn more about what this looks like in practice from Child & Adolescent Development faculty Maria Fusaro as she discusses our Early Childhood Institute and Early Childhood Connections initiative below.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Early Childhood Institute Emily Slusser Andrea Golloher Maria Fusaro

As a faculty member in ChAD (Child and Adolescent Development), I’m privileged to work with many dedicated students as part of their educational journey.  Students bring rich insights from their experiences in their own families and from work and volunteer experiences in their communities to my classes on infant/toddler development.

While classes are a critical part of the college experience, college is also a prime time to make personal and professional connections, broaden our horizons, dream bigger dreams, and persist through new struggles.  When I began my journey as a first-generation college student, I had optimistic but vague perspectives about what higher education was all about.  While I cannot fully appreciate what it means to be a college student in the era of COVID, I do recognize the value of having intentional opportunities for connection and dialogue, especially to recover some of the informal connection that we’ve lost to this virus.

In 2019, I worked with my colleagues Emily Slusser and Andrea Golloher, from ChAD and Special Education, to launch the Early Childhood Institute (ECI).  At its heart, ECI is a hub for all things early childhood on campus, including research, training, and advocacy.  We create opportunities for dialogue to better meet the needs of young children and their families in ways that connect research and practice.

As part of our work, and with the support of Lurie College Strategic Plan funding, ECI established a program called Early Childhood Connections (ECC). ECC focuses on building community and supporting the professional growth of BA and MA students and recent alumni across disciplines in pursuit of careers involving young children.  During each of our ongoing sessions, presenters from SJSU and ECI’s community partners are invited to lead discussions on a range of topics.  We’ve learned about the landscape for infant/toddler intervention in California, strategies for engaging with diverse families, and ways in which early childhood teachers (generalists) can work hand in hand with early childhood specialists. We are particularly proud that some of our presenters are SJSU alum, returning to share their wisdom with the next generation of early childhood professionals.

ECC only exists because of our participants and their voices are critical for shaping the program.  A huge shoutout goes to Thao Ngyuen (ChAD BA, 2021), who has served as our dedicated student coordinator throughout our first year of program design and implementation.  Our team, which also includes Isabel Vallejo and Donna Bee-Gates, developed the bones of the program, and participants have weighed in on our meeting themes and ways to stay connected outside of our planned meetings.  ECC is one part of each of their unique SJSU experiences, but it is one that we hope will carry on long into the future, as they continue their professional journey and stay connected to ECI along the way.

Watch and Attend Our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

What should education look like post-COVID? How do we get there?

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. The SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Speaker Series features nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who are sharing their visions for a post-COVID education system.

Watch the recording from our speaker series event on Friday, March 5:

  • Sec. John King – President and CEO of The Education Trust – Reversing the practices of providing the least educational support to those who need it most
    • 8:42​ – Introduction of Sec. John King by Dr. Jennifer Husbands
    • 10:50​ – Remarks from Sec. John King
    • 28:44​ – Q&A with Sec. John King
  • Dr. Leslie Gonzales – associate professor in the Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Learning unit at Michigan State University – “Towards Epistemic Justice: Unlearning, Relearning, and Refusal in the Academy”
    • 50:40​ – Introduction of Dr. Leslie Gonzales by Dr. María Ledesma
    • 52:01​ – Remarks from Dr. Leslie Gonzales
    • 1:19:00 – Q&A with Dr. Leslie Gonzales

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to register for our upcoming speaker series events:

  • Friday, March 12, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. Fabiola Bagula, Dr. Rebeca Burcaiga, Dr. Melissa Martinez, Dr. Sylvia Mendez-Morse, Ana Tavares, and Dr. Tara Yosso
  • Friday, March 19, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. E.J.R. David, Dr. Saili Kulkarni, Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia, and Leroy Moore

Join us for Episode 3 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Victor leads a dialogue around decolonization in education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What is your initial reaction towards the reading? Do you have an example or question that came to mind after reading the article?
  • How would you describe the topic of decolonization to a student?
  • What would efforts to decolonize education look like?

after reading the article “Decolonization and Education: Locating Pedagogy and Self at the Interstices in Global Times” by Nina Asher prior to the episode.

This episode’s call to action: The effects of colonization can be experienced by the narrow thinking developed in the human mind. As we return to society, we must be more mindful in how we interact with each other. Decolonization begins with decolonizing one’s own mind.

Join us live for our episode 3 on Friday, March 12, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Watch and Attend Our Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

What should education look like post-COVID? How do we get there?

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. The SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Speaker Series features nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who have share their visions for post-COVID education system.

Watch the recording from our speaker series event on Friday, February 26:

  • Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings – Distinguished Professor of Urban Education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison – “But All Lives DO Matter: Being Intentional & Deliberate About an Antiracist Stance”
    • 7:21 – Introduction of Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings by Dr. Saili Kulkarni
    • 12:27 – Remarks from Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings
    • 39:05 – Q&A with Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings
  • Dr. Jonathan Rosa – Associate Professor Graduate School of Education at Stanford University – “Schools Were Never Normal / Learning Happens Everywhere: From Return & Recuperation to Reckoning & Reimagination in Education”
    • 55:11 – Introduction of Dr. Jonathan Rosa by Jorge Pacheco Jr.
    • 57:00 – Remarks from Dr. Jonathan Rosa
    • 1:26:00 – Q&A with Dr. Jonathan Rosa

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to register for our upcoming speaker series events:

  • Friday, March 5, 3:30-5pm PST | Secretary John King & Dr. Leslie Gonzales
  • Friday, March 12, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. Fabiola Bagula, Dr. Rebeca Burcaiga, Dr. Melissa Martinez, Dr. Sylvia Mendez-Morse, Ana Tavares, and Dr. Tara Yosso
  • Friday, March 19, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. E.J.R. David, Dr. Saili Kulkarni, Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia, and Leroy Moore

Call for Lurie College Spring 2021 Student Speaker

Video description: Lurie College student Jacqueline Lopez Rivas – BA, Child and Adolescent Development, speaks at our Fall 2020 ceremony.

Lurie College wants to select a graduating student to represent and speak on behalf of the Lurie College community at our Spring 2021 Graduation Celebration ceremony, which will take place on Friday, May 28, at 4pm!  In order to be eligible to apply to become the student speaker, you must also be eligible to graduate.  Your speech can take any number of approaches, but should be original and should resonate with the event attendees, which will be made up of Lurie College students of different academic levels and disciplines, SJSU and Lurie College faculty and staff, and family and friends of all ages and backgrounds.

To apply, submit a 3-5 minute video of you reciting your speech by Sunday, February 28, via this Google form.  More information about graduation and commencement for Lurie College of Education students is available at sjsu.edu/education/graduation.

Watch Episode 1 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

In this episode, you can learn more about our student co-hosts – Abby, Aminah, Ana, Vaishnavi, and Victor – through their name stories. They also share a preview of some of the topics they plan to discuss in more detail later this semester.

The call to action for this episode: Exchange your name story with a family member, friend, colleague, or classmate!

Additional resources shared in this episode include:

Join us live for our next live dialogue on Friday, February 26, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel.  All of the recordings for this series are available at sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Attend Our Lurie College Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

SJSU Lurie College of Education Spring 2021 Emancipatory Education Speaker Series

Many are looking forward to a time when we can go back to “normal” in education; however, that “normal” wasn’t working for too many of our children, youth, families and communities. Join us for a series of live, online conversations with nationally recognized speakers and emerging voices who will share their visions for post-COVID education through an emancipatory lens and identify steps to enact their visions. Confirmed speakers include:

  • Friday, February 26, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings & Dr. Jonathan Rosa
  • Friday, March 5, 3:30-5pm PST | Secretary John King & Dr. Leslie Gonzales
  • Friday, March 12, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. Fabiola Bagula, Dr. Rebeca Burcaiga, Dr. Melissa Martinez, Dr. Sylvia Mendez-Morse, Ana Tavares, Dr. Tara Yosso
  • Friday, March 19, 3:30-5pm PST | Dr. E.J.R. David, Dr. Saili Kulkarni, Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia, Leroy Moore

Visit sjsu.edu/education/community/iee/speaker-series to register for our upcoming speaker events and revisit the webpage in February for updates about additional speaker events!

Join Lurie College Live for Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a new student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Join us for the live discussion on Friday, February 12, at 5:30pm on the Lurie College YouTube channel – bit.ly/lurie-youtube – to learn from the student co-hosts and get a preview of some of their upcoming dialogues!

  • Abby Almerido – Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Counselor Education

SJSU Lurie College of Education Emancipatory Education Now Meet the Co-Hosts Spring 2021

Join the Early Childhood Institute for a Conversation with Tena Sloan

SJSU Lurie College Early Childhood Insititute Healing-Centered Interactions Across Early Childhood Environments with Tena Sloan

The SJSU Early Childhood Institute is hosting Tena H. Sloan, Vice President of Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation and Training (ECMHC) at Kidango, on Wednesday, February 10, from 3-4pm on Zoom to share her perspectives on making every interaction in early childhood a healing-centered experience. In light of the many persistent stressors facing families with young children in the Bay area and beyond, Tena’s talk “Healing-Centered Interactions Across Early Childhood Settings” will inspire all professionals working with young children and their families to make each interaction one that supports the wellbeing of the whole person.  To learn more and RSVP, visit sjsu.edu/eci/events.