Attend the Lurie College Student Open Forum

SJSU Lurie College of Education Student Forum

Join Dean Heather Lattimer and Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro on Wednesday, October 6, from 3-4pm on Zoom for an informal discussion about your student priorities!  The information to join the Zoom discussion was sent to Lurie College students via a Google Calendar email invitaiton.

Upcoming Lurie College Program Info Sessions

SJSU Lurie College of Education Ed.D Leadership Program Students

The time to become a transformative educator, counselor, therapist, school or community leader is now!  The SJSU Lurie College of Education is hosting several upcoming info sessions for prospective students to learn more about our academic opportunities and the details for our Spring 2022 application cycle.  Select any of the links below to learn more about how to join the Zoom session for each session and please help spread the word to anyone who you think will find these opportunities of interest.

K-12 Teaching Academy | Reimagining K-16 (Science) Teaching and Learning During a Time of Crisis

Presenter

  • Tammie Visintainer, PhD | Assistant Professor Science/Teacher Education | SJSU Lurie College of Education | Twitter: @tavisint

Description

The intersecting COVID-19 and racial injustice crises have re-exposed the interwoven social, racial, political, and economic dimensions of educational opportunity and the injustices laid bare are many. This workshop will empower educators across disciplines from kindergarten to college as designers and leaders, who have the opportunity to transform inequitably designed education systems by radically reimagining and building learning environments from a foundation of human dignity and respect.

This workshop focuses on the design of equitable, inclusive, and justice-centered learning environments through the creation of design principles. Design principles serve as tenets for pedagogy and practice and as guidelines for the design of future learning experiences. To support this, I will draw from my experience as a science teacher educator and learning scientist exploring race, identity, and learning in science education; a professional pathway built from Black brilliance, generous mentorship, and the wisdom of scholars of color. As such, the workshop will engage in reimagining efforts that center the transformative and sustaining practices of Black, Indigenous, Latinx and other scholars of color who inspire the education community to approach teaching and learning from new ethical and pedagogical imaginations.

Workshop attendees will be introduced to design principles and guided through the construction process through an example from my secondary science methods course where teacher candidate’s construct Design Principles for Teaching (Science) for Equity and Inclusion. While science is the focal example, educators from any discipline are encouraged and welcome as this practice is widely applicable. Educators will leave the workshop with an expanded understanding of how to design learning environments that affirm and sustain the identities of minoritized students in/outside of science. This workshop offers hope and possibility for learning communities during the present crises and a reimagining of what they can become moving forward.

Access additional resources and all of our K-12 Teaching Academy webinars at http://sjsu.edu/education/community/k12-academy

Lurie College Faculty Promotions

Congratulations to all of our Lurie College faculty who have recently received tenure and/or been promoted!

  • Child and Adolescent Development faculty Ellen Middaugh has received tenure and become an associate professor
  • Communicative Disorders and Sciences faculty and chair Nidhi Mahendra has become a full professor
  • Educational Leadership faculty and interim chair Rebeca Burciaga has become a full professor and the executive director of our Institute for Emancipatory Education
  • Special Education faculty Andy Golloher has received tenure and become an associate professor
  • Special Education faculty Saili Kulkarni has received tenure and become an associate professor
  • Teacher Education faculty Brent Duckor has become a full professor
  • Teacher Education faculty Roxana Marachi has become a full professor

SJSU Lurie College of Education Spring 2021 Faculty Promotions

Congratulations from Lurie College Dean Heather Lattimer

Congratulations to all of our SJSU Lurie College of Education undergraduate, graduate, credential, and doctoral students for completing a very full and uniquely challenging semester!  Watch this video message from Dean Heather Lattimer or read the transcription of the message below.

Congratulations!!  We have made it to the end of a very full and uniquely challenging semester.

You have persisted through multiple hurdles, thrived while taking on new experiences, and consistently demonstrated your leadership, tenacity, and commitment in your classes, field experiences, and relationships with peers and mentors.

You truly are the transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school, and community leaders that we aspire to prepare here at Lurie College. We are so very proud of you!

I look forward to celebrating with our soon-to-be graduates during SJSU’s virtual and on-campus commencement activities this week.  I’ll be greeting graduates on the blue carpet on Thursday afternoon and celebrating virtually with our Lurie College family on Friday evening.  I hope you’ll join us.

For those of you who are continuing, I can’t wait to welcome you back to campus in August for the Fall 2021 semester.  After over a year of seeing you only through Zoom, I am so excited to be able to greet you in person in Sweeney Hall.

Over the summer we’ll be offering a range of programming for current students, recent alums, and community partners.  Featured activities include our STEM+C Teacher Institute and our K12 Teaching Academy which, this year, will include webinars to support classroom teachers as they work to build community, relationships, and healing following the COVID-19 pandemic.  Please check out our website to stay connected and learn more about these and other opportunities.

As we celebrate your success this year, I want to also take a moment to recognize the friends, family, faculty, and staff who have gone above and beyond to support our students throughout the pandemic.  I have been inspired and humbled by the creativity, commitment, generosity, and love that has been shown by our Lurie College community.  If you have someone who has been particularly inspirational or supportive during this time period, please take a moment to express your gratitude.  As a former school teacher, I can tell you that nothing is better than receiving an unsolicited note of heartfelt appreciation from your students.

I wish you a fantastic summer ahead and hope that you are able to take time to unplug, celebrate your achievements, reflect on your learning, and recharge for the work ahead.

Take good care and congratulations!

Congratulations to our Lurie College Strategic Plan Grant Recipients

During the Spring 2021 semester, Lurie College faculty, staff, and students were able to apply for grant funding for projects that aligned with the priority areas of our strategic plan – community engaged, culturally sustaining, holistic, and interdiscplinary.  Congratulations to all of our teams who were awarded funding for the following projects for the 2021-2022 academic year!

SJSU Lurie College of Education Faculty and Staff Group Photo 8x10

“Bilingual Communication Project”

Project leaders: Peitzu Tsai, PhD – Faculty, Communicative Disorders and Sciences; Lyle Lustigman, PhD – Faculty, Communicative Disorders and Sciences; Janet Bang, PhD – Faculty, Child and Adolescent Development

Project description: Nearly half of the people in California speak a language other than English, including 40% of students in public education, and more than 60% of young children under age 5 are dual language learners (CalEd Facts, 2019; Census, 2020; Holtby, Lordi, Park, & Ponce, 2017). However, support for dual language learners has been challenged by lack of available high-quality assessment (Chernoff, Keuter, Uchikoshi, Quick, & Manship, 2021) and limited evidence-based information on dual speech-language development across languages in early childhood. Without empirical evidence, clinicians and educators are often required to make decisions based on judgments that are at risk of biases, particularly while serving clients and families whose cultural-linguistic backgrounds differ from their own. Strengthening our understanding of dual speech-language development can not only establish high-quality, evidence-based, developmentally-appropriate, and culturally-responsive practice guidelines, but also prepare future clinicians and educators to curb biases and make equitable and holistic decisions while serving children and families with diverse backgrounds. This current project aims to examine speech fluency patterns in the course of bilingual language development in Mandarin-English speaking children to provide future clinicians and educators training in differential diagnosis and recognizing signs for referral related to bilingual fluency development, provide evidence for the professional communities about bilingual fluency development, signs for referrals and appropriate clinical services, increase collaboration between SLP and ChAD undergraduate and graduate student training to inform curricular design in enhancing interdisciplinary student engagement in research and community service, and provide developmentally appropriate and culturally sensitive information for bilingual families in relation to supporting speech and communication in young children at home.

“Creating an Inclusive Climate: Queering Our Classrooms and Our Campus”

Project leaders: Robert Marx, PhD – Faculty, Child and Adolescent Development; Kyoung Mi Choi, PhD – Faculty, Counselor Education; Frank Peña – Outreach Coordinator, The LGBTQ Youth Space

Project description: If you’re hoping to make your class, office, or programming more accessible for and supportive of your queer and trans students and coworkers, be on the lookout for upcoming training sessions and a professional learning community supported by the Strategic Plan Seed Grant. “Creating an Inclusive Climate: Queering Our Classrooms and Our Campus” represents a partnership between the Lurie College of Education and The LGBT Youth Space to offer introductory and advanced trainings at the department and college level around topics like pronouns and vocabulary terms, the hidden curriculum in our classes, and creating opportunities for authentic self-expression. We will also be hosting a Professional Learning Community for faculty and staff who want to more deeply engage in the work of transforming their corner of the campus into a queer-affirming space.

“Early Childhood Connections”

Project leaders: Joy Foster – Faculty, Child and Adolescent Development; Jessica Fraser – Faculty, Child and Adolescent Development

Support team: Iya Namata – Student, Child and Adolescent Development; Isabel Vallejo, EdD – Staff, Dean’s Office; Andrea Golloher, PhD – Faculty, Special Education; Donna Bee-Gates, PhD – Faculty, Child and Adolescent Development; Maria Fusaro, EdD – Faculty, Child and Adolescent Development

Project description: Early Childhood Connections brings together a cohort of SJSU Lurie College of Education students and recent alumni from across disciplines, who are in pursuit of careers involving young children. Through virtual meetings, ECC provides a space for participants to cultivate relationships, build community, and learn from community partners.

“Enacting Emancipatory Education: The Development of an Intersectional Disability Studies Strand (IDSS) at SJSU”

Project leaders: Saili Kulkarni, PhD – Faculty, Special Education; Sudha Krishnan, EdD – Faculty, Special Education

Project description: This project seeks to develop an Intersectional Disability Studies Strand (IDSS) under the existing Institute for Emancipatory Education (IEE) at San Jose State University. Housed in the Lurie College of Education under the Institute for Emancipatory Education, the (IDSS) at San Jose State University will serve as a community-engaged, culturally sustaining space that centers disability visibility and disability as an intersectional identity. Our strand is defined as a space within the IEE that would provide specific resources and supports to engage intersectional disability studies and accessibility in education.

“Enhancing Ethnic Studies Education and Teacher Diversity Pathways”

Project leaders: Luis Poza, PhD – Faculty, Teacher Education; Travis Boyce, PhD – Faculty, African American Studies; Khalid White, EdD – Faculty, San
José City College

Project description: This project will unify and provide support for numerous incipient efforts currently underway between the Teacher Education Department and various other entities. TED seeks to diversify the teacher workforce and increase the anti-racist and emancipatory orientations of teacher candidates. One part of this work is the Ethnic Studies Residency Program (ESRP), which places carefully selected Social Science/History teacher candidates in Ethnic Studies classrooms at Overfelt High School of East Side Union High School District to help prepare teachers specifically of Ethnic Studies or, at minimum, with robust understanding of Ethnic Studies principles and practices should they go on to teach another subject within their credential. Another facet of the work involves partnering with the Ethnic Studies Council at San Jose State to recruit undergraduates in African American Studies, Chicana/o/x Studies, Asian American Studies, and Native American Studies into teacher preparation pathways through the SAGE programs that allow undergraduates to start taking graduate level courses for their teaching credential in their final years as they simultaneously complete their majors. A third dimension encompasses collaboration with Ethnic Studies faculty at San Jose City College who also teach high school dual enrollment Ethnic Studies courses to help their students feel welcome at their various transition points (from high school to junior college, transferring to SJSU SAGE undergraduate pathways, and ideally to Lurie College graduate programs including the ESRP). This project unifies all three of these efforts as part of a cohesive pipeline for capacity-building around Ethnic Studies content and pedagogy.

“Expanding Community Capacity for Youth Civic Empowerment”

Project leaders: Ellen Middaugh, PhD – Faculty, Child and Adolescent Development; Mark Felton, PhD – Faculty, Teacher Education

Project description: Civic education is widely viewed as an essential part of the K–12 education social studies. Yet, high quality civics curriculum is limited and even less has been developed surrounding online civic engagement that intentionally incorporates the lived experiences of students and teachers (Andolin & Conckin, 2020). Furthermore, research has found racial inequities in access to high quality civic learning opportunities, such as opportunities to discuss social problems and current events, options to express student voice and make decisions in an open classroom climate, and inequities based on school achievement and socioeconomic status in the total number of high quality civic learning opportunities (Kahne & Middaugh, 2008). Previous research suggests that the most effective civic education involves teaching through civic participation rather than just teaching about it (Blevins, LeCompte & Wells, 2016). However, teaching through participation online, which is where much public discourse unfolds and where youth often engage with civic issues (Cohen et al, 2012), can feel risky to teachers who have little experience in guiding youth in navigating such settings (Herold, 2016), especially in politically diverse environments. Our goals are to share existing opportunities and practices for youth civic empowerment (e.g. what’s working); identify critical needs for expanding and deepening youth civic empowerment: explore opportunities for integrating digital and civic learning opportunities in school; propose a set of design principles for curriculum that promotes civic action through social media; and develop and implement exemplar units.

“Interprofessional Education Project”

Project leaders: Jason Laker, PhD – Faculty, Counselor Education; Colette Rabin, PhD – Faculty, Teacher Education; Grinell Smith, PhD – Faculty, Teacher Education

Project description: The Interprofessional Education Project group (Jason Laker (Counselor Education), Rebeca Burciaga (Educational Leadership); and Collette Rabin, Grinell Smith, and Lara Kassab (Teacher Education)), will be developing two interdisciplinary education courses to be offered College-wide. One will focus on socio-cultural foundations of education, and the other will introduce students to Community-Based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR), possibly in collaboration with a local School District or other educational or community organization. We will be consulting with faculty across the College to identify representative content, apprehend interest and support among our colleagues, and determine the elements needed for one or both courses to “count” toward various degree and credential programs.

“Justice-Centered Science Teacher Collective: Supporting the Preparation and Development of K-12 Justice-Centered Science Teacher Leaders and Change Agents”

Project leaders: Tammie Visintainer, PhD – Faculty, Teacher Education; Single Subject Credential Program teacher candidates and beginning teacher alumni; teachers from the Lurie College STEM+C Teacher Institute

Project description: In this moment in history, the intersecting racial injustice, public health, and environmental crises have laid bare myriad educational inequities and the K-12 education system finds itself at the precipice of reproducing the injustices of normalcy or transformative change. At the same time, in K-12 science classrooms in California and elsewhere, the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the most recent science education reform, promotes shifting away from formulaic instantiations of the scientific method (e.g., prescribed labs) to align with the way real scientists do their work. However, while NGSS presents exciting opportunities, it also presents challenges. First, teachers are asked to teach science in ways that they often have not experienced themselves. Second, curricular materials are limited as are professional learning opportunities for teachers. To address these challenges, this project brings together Lurie College’s Teacher Education Department and College of Science’s Science Education Program to support the professional learning and development of transformative science educators through participation in a Justice-Centered Science Teacher Collective.

“Perspectives on Culturally Sustaining Practices for Black, Indigenous, and People Of Color who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication”

Project leaders: Alison Pentland – Faculty, Communicative Disorders and Sciences Department; Wendy Quach, Ph.D. – Faculty, Communicative Disorders and Sciences Department

Project description: This project will explore how professionals are supporting and can better support Black, Indigenous, and people of color who have severe communication needs. We intend to bring together individuals from these communities who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) to express themselves. Researchers and moderators will conduct four semi-structured interviews and four focus groups virtually through video conferencing and asynchronous text-based discussion hosted in Canvas. The groups will include people who use AAC and their families, focusing on how their unique cultural and linguistic identities may be supported by the professionals who work with them (e.g. speech-language pathologists, educators, occupational therapists, etc.).

Join us for Episode 6 of Emancipatory Education Now

Emancipatory Education Now is a student-led initiative at the SJSU Lurie College of Education that examines what emancipatory education – the critical evaluation of the systems and structures of oppression that maintain the status quo in our educational institutions – looks like in today’s society and advocates for the expansion of emancipatory education research, policies, and practices.

Our co-hosts for the Spring 2021 semester are:

  • Abby Almerido – Graduate student, Educational Leadership
  • Aminah Sheikh – Undergraduate student, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
  • Ana Isabel Hahs – Graduate and credential student, Teacher Education
  • Vaishnavi Sunkari – Undergraduate student, Child & Adolescent Development, Public Health
  • Victor Calvillo Chavez – Graduate student, Counselor Education

In this episode, Ana leads a dialogue around antiracist education. The co-hosts shared their insights framed by questions such as:

  • What was your initial reaction to the articles and the video? Did anything surprise you?
  • How would you define antiracist education?
  • What do you think are antiracist strategies for teachers? Do you agree with the ones presented in the video?
  • The first article discusses the need to go beyond ethnic studies courses and include anti-racist education in all subjects. How do you think schools and districts can accomplish this?
  • The second article discusses Trump-era policies that sought to prevent schools from teaching critical race theory and federally funded agencies from offering diversity training. While this is no longer an issue under the Biden administration, should we be concerned about such things happening in the future? What do you think is the likelihood of a future administration trying to enact such policies, and is there anything we can do about it in the meantime?
  • Can you identify any challenges to implementing strategies for antiracist education? How can we overcome these?
  • Why is antiracist education important to you? Why do you think it’s important that schools commit to antiracist education?

after reading the articles “California schools, universities condemn anti-Asian attacks, offer support to students” by Carolyn Jones and Ashley Smith and “Diversity Work, Interrupted” by Colleen Flaherty and watching the video “6 Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” by Edutopia.

This episode’s call to action: Watch the video “Six Ways to be an Antiracist Educator” and try to implement at least one of those strategies in your classroom. Additionally, since many of these ideas are applicable beyond the classroom, think about what it would look like for you to implement such practices in your daily life. What can you do to combat racism in your community?

Additional Antiracism and Racial Justice resources are available on the Lurie College website at sjsu.edu/education/community/antiracism.  All of the recordings for this series are available at http://sjsu.edu/education/emancipatory-education-now

Join us at the Lurie College Deans’ Forum

SJSU Lurie College of Education Fall 2020 Deans Forum 4

Lurie College students, join Dean Heather Lattimer and Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro for a conversation on Thursday, November 19, from 3-4pm to discuss what’s next in education following the election results!  The Zoom link will be emailed to all Lurie College students’ via a Google calendar invitation.

Join us at the Lurie College Deans’ Forum

SJSU Lurie College of Education Fall 2020 Deans Forum 3

Lurie College students, join Dean Heather Lattimer and Associate Dean Marcos Pizarro for a conversation on Friday, September 25, from 3-4pm to share insights about your Fall 2020 semester experiences thus far!  The Zoom link will be emailed to all Lurie College students’ via a Google calendar invitation.

Lurie College Faculty Receive Award to Establish Regional Research Hub

 

CCAG-CCREE for Immediate Release
From the SJSU Center for Collaborative Research Excellence in Education (CCREE)

San Jose State University selected as CSU Regional Hub for Northern California to support the educational needs of Youth in Foster Care (FY) and Youth Experiencing Homelessness (HY) in California.

Faculty from the Connie L. Lurie College of Education at San Jose State University have launched a major research and training initiative to address the educational needs of California’s Youth in Foster Care (FY) and Youth Experiencing Homelessness (HY) with the Center for Collaborative Research Excellence in Education (CCREE).  

Funded by an initial $300,000 sub-award from Center for Closing the Achievement Gaps, a project sponsored by the CSU Chancellor’s Office and administered by CSU Long Beach, CCREE will be the CSU Regional Hub for Northern California. 

Continue Reading…

Statement from Dean Heather Lattimer | June 2, 2020

Last week’s murder of an unarmed Black man was shocking, horrifying, and infuriatingly familiar.  George Floyd and his family have now joined a grievously long list of Black and Brown Americans who have had their lives and their liberties taken away by individuals and systems that perpetuate injustice and inequality.  Eric Garner.  Sandra Bland.  Philando Castile.  Freddie Gray.  Terence Crutcher.  Alton Sterling.  Walter Scott.  Tamir Rice.  Michael Brown.  Ahmaud Arbery.  Breonna Taylor.  The list of names seems endless and the pain behind each one is overwhelming.

So many in our community are hurting.  We’ve witnessed a modern-day lynching and it has brought fresh trauma to those who have suffered personal and generational wounds of injustice, racism, and oppression.  These are not isolated incidents but part of a larger culture which privileges some and oppresses others in ways that manifest in everything from the disproportional rates of COVID-19 deaths in Black and Brown communities to the flagrant abuse of privilege by a white dog walker calling the police and falsely claiming that her life was threatened by a Black birdwatcher who had simply asked her to follow the posted leash laws.

Our college is committed to the preparation of transformative educators, counselors, therapists, school and community leaders.  In the face of such glaring and graphic evidence of the deep roots of racism and the brokenness of our society, this work has taken on even greater importance and added urgency.

Our society needs transformative leaders in education-related fields now more than ever.  We need teachers who recognize the racist and hegemonic roots of our society and seek to understand how that reality impacts the lived experiences of our students.  We need counselors and therapists who believe that an integral part of being an advocate for the children and clients in our care is the willingness to call out discriminatory structures and systems that continue to breed inequity.  We educators who are willing to interrogate our own assumptions and engage in hard conversations about privilege, marginalization, bias, and inequity.  We need leaders who consistently and repeatedly stand with marginalized communities and vulnerable individuals and take bold action to make transformative change happen.

In the midst of heartache and outrage, I take solace in the knowledge that Lurie College is a community that is deeply committed to equity, inclusion, and racial and social justice.  I see strength in the dedication of our faculty, staff, and community partners.  I see hope in the passion and tenacity of our students and alumni.  Together, we will continue to work toward the promise of transformative change and the realization of a more just and equitable society.

Educators of Impact | Ann-Marie Sierra

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about SJSU Alumni and Ann-Marie Sierra below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Ann-Marie Sierra

“Ann-Marie is a Kindergarten teacher who has risen above the challenges, doing what is best for kids emotionally and academically and highly deserving this award. Her teacher candidate stated, “She is the definition of an inspirational teacher. Ms. Sierra doesn’t strive to be perfect, but strives to do what is best for her kids.” Showing kids all the kindness in the world, comes second nature to her. She exemplifies what many teachers are striving for during this difficult time.

She greets students individually as they enter their daily morning meeting. She shares the calendar, picks a name-stick for the weather report, and more. Her “praise time” is now through Class Dojo messages, morning meetings, and on Seesaw. Other positive examples are online reading groups using Raz-Kid books to help with differentiation, class “Show and Tell”, using Jamboard for magnetic word lists, “office hours” for 1:1 time with families, making video lessons for her kids, online math lessons, Seesaw writing activities, and even a virtual field trip to the farm. Ann-Marie has eagerly stepped up to help provide the most efficient and successful lessons for her kids. Again, I hope that you consider her highly for this award.”

Educators of Impact | Ashley Messner

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about SJSU Alumni Ashley Messner below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Ashley Messner

“Miss Ashley is a Junior Kindergarten teacher at Moreland Preschool. Miss Ashley has worked hard to engage the students in the program through the use of FlipGrid. She creates interactive read aloud videos that focus on topics such as social emotional learning, number sense, and reading foundation skills. Not only does Miss Ashley engage her students prior to reading, but she often includes visuals such as anchor charts and props to help her students understand and connect with the text. Beyond the videos, there are extension activities to keep our little learners busy and also help them find joy amidst the SIP orders. Miss Ashley is an educator at impact, because she knows how much her students miss connecting with their teachers and friends, she is committed to helping students feel the community that she and the other teachers at Moreland Preschool have worked hard to create!”

Educators of Impact | Katie Morse

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about SJSU Alumni Katie Morse below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Katie Morse

“Katie is an amazing 4th grade mentor teacher this year for one of my 143B students. Katie meets with her class every day to ensure that they are supported in their distance learning. Katie has welcomed my teaching candidate in from the very beginning, demonstrating a vast knowledge about the classroom and most specifically reading instruction. Katie has advocated for my candidate to be involved in Google Classroom, appealing to her district to ensure the candidate had access. She pushes my candidate to have confidence in her own ability and instruction in such a supportive way. This candidate is still teaching on a daily basis, amidst the chaos of Covid-19. Adrienne has bloomed in this classroom, and has grown in every area we evaluate as supervisors. This simply would not have been possible without the guidance of a MASTER mentor teacher.”

Educators of Impact | Candice Nance

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about SJSU Alumni and current Lurie College EdD Leadership Program student Candice Nance below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Candice Nance

“Of anyone I’ve ever met, Candice embodies the idea of being a lifelong learner.  She constantly works to improve her own knowledge and skills so she can improve opportunities for her students.”

Educators of Impact | Barbara Conant

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about SJSU Alumni Barbara Conant below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Barbara Conant

“Barbara Conant was an amazing 5th grade classroom teacher; I had the opportunity as a friend, colleague and administrator to know this from my personal observation of Barbara’s classroom.  With her excellent teaching strategies, she delivered the curriculum to her students through real life experiences.  They witnessed historical events by recreating them in plays, debates, banquets, and more.  Students enjoyed literature by becoming actors, wearing appropriate costumes of that period. Her classroom became a laboratory.  And how do I know that Barbara was an extremely effective teacher?  Because she is still in contact with many of her former students; she attends their weddings, they invite her to lunch or dinner to let her know about their jobs and achievements.  I know for a fact when Barbara, in retirement, became Mayor of Campbell, her former students walked precincts for her.  To sum things up, Barbara accomplished extraordinary things as a teacher, and she has been blessed that her students keep in touch with her to let her know what a difference she has made in their lives.”

Educators of Impact | Mario Rocha

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about Mario Rocha below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Mario Rocha

“Mr. Mario Rocha joined the O.B. Whaley Elementary School staff during the 2019-20 school year as a Resource Specialist Teacher.  Immediately, he was a perfect fit for our student population, a diverse Title 1 school.  He created an inviting learning environment where students easily made connections with him and felt his genuine love for them.  Within weeks of him as the school’s new resource teacher, student absenteeism improved, students made academic gains, and students enjoyed school!  Mr. Rocha is one of a kind, and we are so fortunate to have him as an educator.”

Educators of Impact | Donna Lewis

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about Goleta Union School District Superintendent Donna Lewis below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Dr. Donna Lewis

1. As an educator, what gives you the greatest sense of achievement?

As an educator of nearly 30 years and in my current role as Superintendent, my greatest sense of achievement comes from knowing we are working cohesively as a professional learning community to meet the needs of a diverse student population.  This takes creativity, collaboration, tenacity and a lot of hard work.  We hold high expectations for every student and make no excuses. As a result, our students are outperforming peers from similar school districts.  This is so highly rewarding.

2. What impact has your career had on you?

Public education is ever-evolving and fraught with challenges such as lack of funding, resources, and now distance learning as we cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.  Despite these challenges, or maybe because of them, I have learned to be patient, to be more empathetic, and to never give up — not on any student, family, colleague, or myself. I am definitely a better person for having served as an educator.

3. What advice would you give to a current or aspiring educator?

Being an educator is a calling. I gave up a career in finance to become a teacher because I wanted to make a difference in the lives of students. My advice to any current or aspiring educator would be to push yourself out of your comfort zone.  When opportunity knocks be willing to be flexible and try something new.  Take leadership opportunities.  Get your master’s degree as soon as possible and consider a doctoral degree.  Challenge yourself and always be self-reflective.  Most of all, never forget you are a role model for others.  Respect and treasure the power that you have as an educator to influence the lives of so many.

Educators of Impact | Connie L. Lurie

With the COVID-19 crisis making it abundantly clear the critical role that educators play in our society, Lurie College is recognizing SJSU Educators of Impact who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities.  Learn more about Connie L. Lurie below.  To nominate an SJSU graduate who is an Educator of Impact, please complete this brief Google form.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Educator of Impact Connie L. Lurie

Connie L. Lurie’s commitment to education has had a tremendous impact on both San José State University and the Bay Area as a whole. Her dedication to the university and her philanthropic spirit exemplify the ideals of the College of Education and San José State University.

Connie graduated from San José State with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and psychology in 1964. She taught in elementary schools on the Monterey Peninsula for six years and later ventured into real estate investment. In her heart, Connie has always been an educator. She established the Guardian Scholars program, which provides support and mentorship to former foster youths at SJSU and endowed the university’s Lurie Author-in-Residence program, which attracts renowned national and international authors to serve as distinguished visiting scholars for one or two semesters. She launched Spartans in the Desert Golf Tournament and Dinner, which brought SJSU faculty and alumni together for a weekend of events in Palm Desert for thirteen years. In May 2013, Connie served as SJSU’s commencement speaker and was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the California State University System. On May 4, 2007, the SJSU Connie L. Lurie College of Education was named in her honor.

Beyond SJSU, Connie is involved in many worthwhile education-focused causes throughout the Bay Area and California. She has served on numerous boards, including the San Francisco Zoological Society, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, Strive for College and California State Parks Foundation. She has been active with The Living Desert, Kipp Schools, Aim High, and United Religions International. She’s championed summer science camps for kids through the Boys and Girls Club of Coachella Valley and was awarded their Champion of Youth Award in 2019. Connie is particularly proud of the role that she has played in connecting non profits so that they can work together to benefit children and youth.

With her dedication to education, leadership in promoting access to higher education, charitable giving, and longstanding support of the university, Connie L. Lurie is an outstanding “Educator of Impact.”

Call for Nominations for Educators of Impact

COVID-19 has made it clear how critical educators are in our society.  Help us recognize SJSU Lurie College of Education alumni who have made a transformative difference in the lives of children, families, and communities!  Nominate an Educator of Impact at https://bit.ly/3eFjy8n

SJSU Lurie College of Education Alumni Irene Castillon

Lurie College Student Opinion Piece Published in Mercury News

Shoutout to Single Subject Credential Program Elizabeth Unpingco, whose letter to the editor “Homeland security means taking care of our own first” was recently published in the Mercury News.  Give it a read below or by visiting the Mercury News at https://bayareane.ws/34tDhU4.

SJSU Lurie College of Education Teacher Education Department Student Elizabeth Unpingco

It is up to us to prime the pump of recovery

Homeland security means taking care of our own — first and foremost. If we learn anything from the horrific experience we find ourselves in now, it is that without a strong, cohesive and healthy foundation — supporting essential health care, food industry, education and government workers on the front lines — we are all in danger of succumbing to collapse.

We must reevaluate our priorities — care for one another and the environment and not consider wasteful military spending as essential to the survival of our way of life.

Let’s let our elected leaders hear that we demand the reallocation of billions of dollars currently budgeted for military spending toward real security.

It is up to us to prime the pump of recovery and human survival.  The world is watching the USA as a leader and we must be a better model of action by the people for the people.

SJSU Lurie College Students Praise Their Faculty

We recently asked our students “Which of your classes or professors has been the most exciting for you this semester??” on our Instagram account – @sjsulurie – and were excited to see so many students give shoutouts to their faculty.  Check them out in the Instagram post below!

Read the 2018-19 Lurie College of Education Annual Report

The Connie L. Lurie College of Education at San Jose State University is a place of transformation, where we prepare educators, counselors, therapists, and community leaders using emancipatory pedagogy across our teaching, scholarship and service. Learn more about our impact by reading through this report and join the Lurie College family by visiting sjsu.edu/education!

Teacher Appreciation Week Special Education Stories: Everett Smith

To celebrate Teacher Appreciation Week, the SJSU Lurie College of Education met with some of its students, alumni, and faculty from the Special Education department to learn more about their journeys into the field of special education.  Read about or listen to Everett Smith’s journey below!

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Teacher Appreciation Week Special Education Stories: Devdutt Srivastava

To celebrate Teacher Appreciation Week, the SJSU Lurie College of Education met with some of its students, alumni, and faculty from the Special Education department to learn more about their journeys into the field of special education.  Read about or listen to Devdutt Srivastava’s journey below!

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