February 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album and video

Today’s multilingual voter pamphlets do not have instructions in French, German, Italian, or Portuguese. But as historian Ralph Pearce reveals, between 1848 and 1920 those ethnic groups were among the most prevalent communities in the Santa Clara Valley. The February 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album explores San Jose’s early immigrants and their interesting ethnic neighborhoods.

In the February 2018 Sourisseau Academy news video Michael Hurley examines San Jose’s earliest banks; one of which — A.P. Giannini’s Bank of Italy — eventually became today’s Bank of America.

Natalie Baszile

The Center for Literary Arts and the SJSU African-American Studies Department present Natalie Baszile: Reading & Conversation with Selena Anderson.

Natalie Baszile is the author of the Southern debut novel Queen Sugar, which has been adapted for television by writer and director Ava DuVernay and co-produced by Oprah Winfrey. Queen Sugar was named one of the San Francisco Chronicle‘s Best Books of 2014 and nominated for the NAACP Image Award. Natalie also writes nonfiction, which has appeared in Lenny Letter, O, The Oprah Magazine, and The Best Women’s Travel Writing, Volume 9.

  • When: February 8, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
  • Where: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, Room 225
  • Info: www.litart.org

Womens Rights in Contemporary Armenian Society: Between Modernization and Traditions

The SJSU Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program presents Dr. Gohar Shahnazaryan, speaking on Womens Rights in Contemporary Armenian Society: Between Modernization and Traditions.

Dr. Gohar Shahnazaryan, is the Director of Yerevan State University Center for Gender and Leadership Studies and the Co-Director of Women’s Resource Center NGO in Armenia. She holds a PhD in Sociology and is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Applied Sociology at YSU. In 2008, 2009 and 2011 for one semester each year she has been a visiting scholar at the Institute of Slavic, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies at UC Berkeley through Open Society Institute Fellowship.

  • When: Feb 8, 2018, 1:30-2:30
  • Where: Student Union Room 3A

Elizabeth Weiss discusses new book

“I love bones. My appreciation of the beauty of skeletal anatomy started at a very young age,” writes Anthropology Professor Elizabeth Weiss in a University of Florida Press blog post, “Human Variation: More Than Skin Deep.” In the post Professor Weiss discusses insights from her new book, Reading the Bones: Activity, Biology, and Culture. For example, “forensic anthropologists are attempting to use bone variation to identify more than just age, sex, and cause of death. Some have used differences in upper arm bone diameters to look at whether the individual was left- or right-handed, arguing that the strength of the bone indicates which arm was used more.” Fascinating!

Jan English-Lueck interviewed in a documentary

Anthropology Professor Jan English-Lueck will appear in a forthcoming documentary on the Science Channel, “Silicon Valley: The Untold Story.” The documentary premieres on January 28. The program description follows:

“Just south of San Francisco lies a region that has spawned not just new products but whole new industries, from vacuum tubes to radio, microchips to personal computers, mobile devices, apps and social media. Home to Apple and Facebook, Intel and Google, there is simply no other place on earth that can rival its remarkable record of innovation. A new Science Channel three-part documentary series will provide a comprehensive look at the century-and-a-half history of this fascinating place, and reveal how and why it became such a fertile ground for technological breakthroughs. SILICON VALLEY: THE UNTOLD STORY premieres Sunday, January 28 at 8, 9 and 10 p.m. It is produced with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA is serving as the community and education outreach partner on the series.”

This promises to be a very interesting program!