Born Out Struggle: Critical Race Theory, School Creation and the Politics of Interruption A conversation with David Stovall, University of Illinois at Chicago

WHEN: Thursday, April 6 @ 4 pm
WHERE: SJSU, Sweeney Hall 331

David Stovall, Ph.D. is a Professor of Educational Policy Studies and African-American Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). His scholarship investigates four areas: 1) Critical Race Theory, 2) concepts of social justice in education, 3) the relationship between housing and education, and 4) the relationship between schools and community stakeholders. In the attempt to bring theory to action, he has spent the last ten years working with community organizations and schools to develop curricula that address issues of social justice.

Born Out of Struggle offers important lessons about school creation from the ground up. While the story of a 19-day hunger strike serves as the backdrop of the discussion, the focus of this talk will be on concrete examples of the challenges and contradictions of keeping young people, families, and community members central to community control of education. The discussion to follow will explore the relevance of these lessons for students, community, and families, as well as educational leaders & classroom teachers of all subjects & grade levels.

Sponsored by the College of Education and Mexican American Studies

2017 Leon Panetta Lecture Series: The Economy—Trade, Jobs, Taxes and Immigration

The second lecture, The Economy—Trade, Jobs, Taxes and Immigration, will be held on Monday, April 3, 2017 and will feature Carly Fiorina, CEO of Hewlett-Packard (1999-2005) and candidate for president (2016); and Robert Reich, economic analyst, author and U.S. secretary of labor (1993-1997).  Leon Panetta, chairman of the Panetta Institute, former secretary of defense and former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, will moderate the discussion.

Student Program: Through the generosity of the Panetta Institute for Public Policy, the Institute is providing SJSU scholarships for at least 20 students to attend each of the lectures in this series.

These afternoon student programs will begin with registration at 11:45 a.m. at the Sunset Cultural Center in Carmel. At 12:45 p.m., Panetta Institute professors will facilitate an academic exercise focusing on the lecture topic until 2:15 p.m.  This session informs students about the issues to be discussed and encourages them to develop questions and comments for interactive dialogue with the speakers.  After a fifteen-minute break, the lecture begins at 2:30 p.m., with the guest speakers and Secretary Panetta presenting a discussion amongst themselves.  During the second half they will answer the students’ questions.  The program will end at 4:30 p.m. Students must provide their own transportation to and from the event.

Frances Edwards Receives Community Partnership Award

Congratulations to Professor of Political Science Frances Edwards, who was recognized by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) when it presented SJSU’s Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) with their Community Partnership Recognition award. Specifically, VTA recognized the efforts of MTI Research Associates, Dr. Frances Edwards and Mr. Dan Goodrich for the expert training they provided to VTA on emergency management. “We are recognizing the Mineta Transportation Institute for being a valued community partner. VTA reached out to MTI to educate VTA on its roles and responsibilities in the event of a wide scale emergency or disaster. The MTI Instructors brought multiple decades of Emergency Management and Security experience to VTA and provided a depth of knowledge of the four phases of Emergency Management: Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery. VTA continues to partner with MTI to deliver quality Emergency Management Education to its employees,” said San José Mayor Sam Liccardo and VTA Board of Directors Vice Chairperson. Dr. Edwards and Mr. Goodrich bring decades of experience in emergency management to their work with transportation agencies. Their most recent research, Emergency Management Training for Transportation Agencies, identifies best practices in providing training courses to adults, with a particular emphasis on the effectiveness of interactive training materials.

Faustina DuCros awarded Wilson Fellowship

Congratulations to Assistant Professor of Sociology Faustina DuCros, who has been awarded a Career Enhancement Fellowship for Junior Faculty from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation! Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and administered by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the Career Enhancement Fellowship Program seeks to increase the presence of underrepresented junior faculty who are committed to eradicating racial disparities in core fields across the arts, humanities, and social sciences. The program allows exceptional junior faculty to pursue scholarly research and writing during their fellowship period in an effort to facilitate the acquisition of tenure. DuCros received a year-long fellowship: June 2017 to June 2018.

DuCros’ fellowship project is entitled “Louisiana Migrants in California Oral History Project.” Louisianans were among millions of Black southerners who left their home region during the second phase of the Great Migration. The study documents the migration stream of Louisianans to California, and investigates migrants’ experiences creating community and identity in their destination. Like Southern California (the site of the study’s first phase), the San Francisco Bay Area was a significant destination for Black Louisiana migrants. Though Los Angeles’ Black population was numerically larger, the Bay Area’s Black population ballooned at much higher rates than Los Angeles’ during the World War II period, and cities like Oakland had higher proportions of Black residents. Different neighborhood contexts create variation in how members of racial and ethnic groups construct identities. Thus, the second phase of DuCros’ research — oral history interviews with first- and second-generation Louisianans who helped grow the Bay Area’s Black population at the height of the Great Migration — comparatively elucidates the role of local places in identity construction and documents the community-making experiences of Louisianans in this distinct destination.