Natalie Baszile

The Center for Literary Arts and the SJSU African-American Studies Department present Natalie Baszile: Reading & Conversation with Selena Anderson.

Natalie Baszile is the author of the Southern debut novel Queen Sugar, which has been adapted for television by writer and director Ava DuVernay and co-produced by Oprah Winfrey. Queen Sugar was named one of the San Francisco Chronicle‘s Best Books of 2014 and nominated for the NAACP Image Award. Natalie also writes nonfiction, which has appeared in Lenny Letter, O, The Oprah Magazine, and The Best Women’s Travel Writing, Volume 9.

  • When: February 8, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
  • Where: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, Room 225
  • Info:

A Public Discussion of Public Monuments

Join us for a community conversation and consideration of the issues surrounding public monuments around the country today, including the Columbus statue in San José City Hall. This event features the following SJSU panelists:

  • Dore Bowen, Associate Professor, Art History & Visual Culture
  • Libra Hilde, Associate Professor, History
  • Marco Meniketti, Professor, Anthropology
  • Manuel Callahan, Lecturer, Mexican-American Studies
  • Michael Roman, President, Native American Student Organization
  • Martin Madrigal, Co-Chair, MEChA de SJSU
  • Moderator: Melinda Jackson, Chair, Political Science

Students, faculty, staff, and community members are welcome.

  • When: 5:00–6:00, October 17
  • Where: MLK225

Sourisseau Academy July 2017 photo album and video

By the early 1930s, the Santa Clara Valley’s canneries were the largest employers of women in California. Margo McBane, SJSU History professor and Sourisseau Board member, tells us their story of 18-hour workdays, with employment opportunity divided along gender, ethnic, and racial lines.

This month’s Sourisseau Academy news video explores the experience of working in orchards and nurseries in Morgan Hill, where women’s work, though somewhat different than that in the canneries, was equally intense.

Born Out Of Struggle: Critical Race Theory, School Creation and the Politics of Interruption A conversation with David Stovall, University of Illinois at Chicago

WHEN: Thursday, April 6 @ 4 pm
WHERE: SJSU, Sweeney Hall 331

David Stovall, Ph.D. is a Professor of Educational Policy Studies and African-American Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). His scholarship investigates four areas: 1) Critical Race Theory, 2) concepts of social justice in education, 3) the relationship between housing and education, and 4) the relationship between schools and community stakeholders. In the attempt to bring theory to action, he has spent the last ten years working with community organizations and schools to develop curricula that address issues of social justice.

Born Out of Struggle offers important lessons about school creation from the ground up. While the story of a 19-day hunger strike serves as the backdrop of the discussion, the focus of this talk will be on concrete examples of the challenges and contradictions of keeping young people, families, and community members central to community control of education. The discussion to follow will explore the relevance of these lessons for students, community, and families, as well as educational leaders & classroom teachers of all subjects & grade levels.

Sponsored by the College of Education and Mexican American Studies

Student Accomplishments

Congratulations to Mariela Acevedo!

Mariela Acevedo, a second-year graduate student in our Clinical Program, was recently awarded a scholarship through the California MFT Stipend Program.

The California MFT Stipend Program is funded through the Mental Health Services Act and administered bu the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development to address the statewide workforce need for mental health practitioners in underserved communities of California.