Research Ship Returns from 17,000-Mile Journey

Vessel Completes 17,000-Mile Journey

Research Vessel Returns

A sign in Palmer Station, Antarctica, to which an arrow for Moss Landing was added by the Point Sur’s crew (Rebecca Shoop photo).

Cruise to support scientific operations near Palmer Station is a first for a National Science Foundation vessel of the R/V Point Sur’s “regional class” size.

Media Contact: Brynn Hooton-Kaufman, 831-771-4464MOSS LANDING, Calif. –

The Research Vessel Point Sur cruised into her home port of Moss Landing Harbor this Thur., May 2, returning from a research voyage to the Antarctic Peninsula.  The National Science Foundation vessel operated by Moss Landing Marine Laboratories has been gone more than five months, supporting research in the Southern and Pacific Oceans during a trip that was unprecedented by an NSF vessel of her size.

The 135-foot R/V Point Sur departed Moss Landing on Nov. 29 on a trip that took her more than 17,000 miles, and is one that is more commonly made by vessels that are 200 or 300 feet in length.  The Point Sur, as she is affectionately known by the MLML community, was chosen by NSF for the mission for her cost-effective, flexible size and her prior achievements working in the Aleutian Island Chain and Bering Sea in Alaska.

Ice Sheets

The Point Sur began her voyage with a month-long transit to Punta Arenas, Chile where final preparations were made, and geologists from the University of South Carolina boarded as the first science party of the trip.  The geologists made use of the Point Sur’s voyage to collect data to help determine if ice sheets deposited large quantities of sediment around Antarctica during the Cretaceous Period.  Principal Investigator David Barbeau chronicled the team’s progress from afar in Brooklyn on his blog, Antarctic Ice Dodgers 2013.  Breathtaking photographs on the blog depict the team venturing to sites to identify rocks and collect samples, and journal-like posts document the Point Sur crew’s valiant efforts to support the team and keep scientists safe.   On Jan. 18, Barbeau posted pictures of the Point Sur’s crew towing small icebergs away from his team’s pickup location on an island, writing, “…the (Antarctic Ice) Dodgers are indeed amongst fine people.”

The Point Sur arrived at Palmer Station on Anvers Island, Antarctica on Jan. 26, nearly 18 months after planning for the journey began.  At Palmer Station the science party from University of South Carolina disembarked, and the Point Sur was joined by members of the Palmer Antarctica Long Term Ecological Research Project (LTER), whose work has been conducted for more than 20 years.  The Point Sur transported the LTER scientists to the western side of Anvers Island to survey penguin colonies, reaching an area that had not been surveyed by land since the mid 1980s.

Tagging Whales

The Point Sur continued juggling science parties throughout her time in Antarctica, supporting a whale research group from Duke University who were able to tag so many whales that they ran out of tagging supplies.  Also before leaving Palmer Station, the vessel was able to host a scientific diving operation from the University of Alabama, studying a kelp-like brown seaweed called Ascoseira.  In his blog post titled “Long Stemmed Seaweeds, Magnificent Cliffs, with Memories of Old Heroes,” scientist Chuck Amsler writes of reaching his research site at Lemaire, “possibly the most beautiful spot on the entire Antarctic Peninsula if not the continent as a whole,” not reachable by Zodiacs launched from Palmer Station, and therefore only made possible on this trip by transport by the Point Sur.

In early March the Point Sur departed Palmer Station, beginning the two-month return trip home.  Again she was bestowed with safe travel across the Drake’s Passage, one of the most dangerous waterways of the oceans.   She has continued supporting science parties up the coast of the Americas, providing to all researchers resounding successes, and to some their most successful research cruises to date.   “We are proud of the excellent support of science provided by the Point Sur,” said Moss Landing Marine Laboratories interim Director Jim Harvey.  “It takes an incredible amount of planning, teamwork, and expertise to accomplish this extraordinary voyage.  We look forward to her arrival on Thursday.”

Moss Landing Marine Laboratories is the graduate program in marine science for California State Universities East Bay, Fresno, Monterey Bay, Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose and Stanislaus. Learn more about MLML. View the Point Sur blog.

Showcasing Science Talent

Over 150 students working in the labs of 40 faculty members displayed 64 posters and one truck at the Ninth Annual College of Science Research Day held May 3 at Duncan Hall. Students and faculty were on hand to discuss their work with visitors including alumni and industry representatives. Most of the students were undergraduates majoring in biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, meteorology and climate sciences and physics and astronomy. Associate Professor Craig Clements and his students also demonstrated their new mobile atmospheric profiling system, a truck pulling a compact trailer loaded with the latest tech tools including lidar and sodar, which use light and sound waves to track winds generated by wildfires.

Assistant Professor Receives Guggenheim

Assistant Professor Receives Guggenheim

Assistant Professor Receives Guggenheim

Assistant Professor Danielle Harris

Assistant Professor of Justice Studies Danielle Harris has received a $36,000 research grant from The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation for a project exploring desistance from sexual offending (meaning no longer committing sexual offenses) in a sample of 100 men released from custody through a Massachusetts program from 1974 through 1991.

“Professor Harris’ work … is a powerful example of the important research being conducted in the justice studies department at SJSU; research that not only moves forward theory and practice, but that also has real relevance to marginalized communities and that helps in our collective efforts to achieve social justice through scholarship,” according to the CASA Blog.

In addition to her research, Harris is actively involved in the SJSU Record Clearance Project. Her research interests include many aspects of sexual offending: specialization and versatility; the criminal career paradigm; desistance; female sexual offending; and related public policy. She is the director of research for the Art of Yoga Project, a nonprofit organization that provides a yoga and creative arts curriculum to girls in custody. Learn more from the CASA Blog.

Middle School Students Become Scientists-for-a-Day

Middle Schoolers as Scientists-for-a-Day

By Brynn Hooton-Kaufman, MLML Development Associate

Middle School Students Become Scientists-for-a-Day

MLML Associate Professor Ivano Aiello leads a discussion on seafloor mud with Pacific Grove Middle School students (MLML photo).

Moss Landing Marine Labs’ Research Vessel Point Sur is currently returning from the waters of Antarctica, where it supported research funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs. But before it left for the pole, students from Pacific Grove Middle School spent a day onboard the R/V Point Sur investigating local geology.

The trip was initiated by MLML Associate Professor Ivano Aiello, who wanted to bring K-12 students into the world of marine science.

Aiello recently served as the sedimentologist for a Bering Sea expedition aboard the JOIDES Resolution, a research vessel equipped to drill sediment cores from the ocean floor.

Part of the Integrated Ocean Discovery Program, the expedition’s purpose was to study the history of the oceans through sediments.

“The program has all the components – exploration, discovery, hand‐on applications of mathematical and physical science – to be an inspiration for youth, K‐12 students and their teachers,” said Aiello.

MLML’s Teacher Enhancement Program was instrumental in helping Aiello make this a reality. Program Director Dr. Simona Bartl matched Dr. Aiello’s proposed activities to middle school earth science standards, and offered the activity to past participants of TEP. Pacific Grove Middle School Teacher Kelly Terry’s class was selected.

“Having local higher education institutions willing to share their expertise and resources is huge,” she said. “We live in such a unique and special place…and learning more about what makes our area unique is one of the important things that I have brought away from my experience with TEP.”

Read more on the MLML blog.

Chemistry Professor Leads Students In Lanthanide Research

Professor Leads Students In Research Linked to MRIs

Chemistry Professor Leads Students In Lanthanide Research

Professor Muller leads a research group comprised of 10 undergraduates and two graduates. The team created this lanthanide compound.

Have you ever wondered how an MRI machine uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the body?

Key to the process is the lanthanide series of the periodic table, the fifteen metallic chemical elements with atomic numbers 57 through 71.

Department of Chemistry Chair Gilles Muller does research that helps biochemists understand how molecules interact with other molecules in the body using the lanthanide series as probes.

“The reason why we study lanthanides is because when you excite them with a certain wavelength, or a light of a certain color, they emit another wavelength or color,” he said.

Muller studies these emissions using circularly polarized luminescence spectroscopy, a technique that uses lasers to determine the configuration and interaction between compounds and biomolecules.

Thanks to the National Institutes of Health and other grants, Muller leads a dynamic research group comprised of 10 undergraduates and two graduates focused on polarized light and the potential for biomedical applications.

Interested in joining the team? You can learn more on Muller’s research on his website.

Mentoring students

“It’s been really nice getting to learn more about the research process and how you put on your own individual projects,” said chemistry masters student Victoria Chang. “Dr. Muller designed it in such a way that I will get to learn how to use different instruments and methods that I’m learning will be applied to the future.”

In 2008, Muller won the Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award for his dedication as an outstanding teacher and mentor for undergraduate scholarly research.

“The most rewards come from seeing that at some point, I have made a contribution to my students’ futures,” Muller said. “We are an institute where faculty and students work very close and that’s why I came to SJSU.”

Studying Wildfires, Saving Lives

SJSU’s resident wildfire weather expert hit the road recently, driving all the way to Texas to learn more about the super dynamic atmospheric conditions inside and around blazes so we can better predict wildfire behavior, saving lives and property. Craig Clements, an associate professor with the Department of Meteorology and Climate Science, and his graduate students tested their mobile atmospheric profiling system, a truck pulling a compact trailer loaded with the latest tech tools including lidar and sodar, which use light and sound waves to track winds. Clements’ and his team led a group of over 50 scientists in an experiment called FireFlux II, which included airborne imagery from a helicopter that flew over the 150-acre controlled burn ignited by the Texas A&M Forest Service. Clements’ groundbreaking research is funded in part by a $900,000 grant from The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program, the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award in support of junior faculty members nationwide. In 2011, Professor Clements received the SJSU Research Foundation‘s Early Career Investigator Award, which recognizes tenure-track faculty members who excel in research, scholarship and creative activity, and have secured funds for research early in their careers. View a related television news report.

Point Sur Reaches Antarctica

Point Sur Reaches Antarctica

Point Sur Reaches Antarctica

A team of scientists disembark from Moss Landing’s research vessel with the goal of “scouring islands for sedimentary rock looking for evidence that there may have been glaciers in the earth’s past when the planet was much warmer than it is today,” writes chef/steward/photographer Tara Pastuszek.

When scientists needed a lift to the South Pole, they called Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. So began a truly epic, 8,000-mile journey for the research vessel Point Sur and crew, full of spectacular sunsets, wildlife sightings and, just a few days ago, landfall at their ice encrusted destination, Palmer Station. Researchers on board include a team led by University of South Carolina PhD candidate Ben Oliver, whose blog offers many amazing photos. “Our current science party has been busy at work scouring islands for sedimentary rock looking for evidence that there may have been glaciers in the earth’s past when the planet was much warmer than it is today,” writes Point Sur crew member Tara Pastuszek on the Point Sur blog, which offers equally impressive imagery. “One of the objectives of this study is to gain insight into how glaciers will be impacted by modern climate change.” In this and many other ways, Point Sur and MLML support marine science research with worldwide impacts. MLML is a consortium of California State University campuses administered by San Jose State and the SJSU Research Foundation.

 

Student Learning and Research Commons

Student Learning & Research Commons

Student Learning and Research Commons

The view from the SJSU Student Learning and Research Commons (Elisabeth Thomas photo).

Are you a student looking for a comfortable place to work on a research paper, where you can borrow a computer and get help from a librarian?

Then you might want to check out the SJSU Student Learning and Research Commons at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Library. A grand opening and dedication will be held 1 p.m. Jan. 31 in the space, which is above the Children’s Room.

“This new space brings technology and support together in one physical place, and it will continue to grow and change as technology and student needs grow and change,” said Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn.

The commons also offers a glimpse of the future for libraries.

“Today information comes to us. With e-books and databases, students can do much of their research from home or even while riding public transit,” said University Library Dean Ruth Kifer. “But even as information becomes increasingly digital, students still need a physical space to talk, plan and learn.”

Need a printer or wifi? No problem. Both will be available at the commons, along with desktops, laptops and iPads. You’ll also find meeting space with whiteboards for group projects. And in case you’ve got a question, library staff will be right there for research and technical support.

You’ll need your Tower Card to get in. This commons is for SJSU only. On Jan. 31, everyone will be treated to complimentary coffee and hourly giveaways.

For the rest of spring term, the commons will be open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

SJSU's Best of 2012

Olympian Tops SJSU’s Best of 2012

SJSU's Best of 2012

SJSU’s 2012 Olympian Marti Malloy is welcomed home by her coach, the legendary Yosh Uchida (Christina Olivas photo).

We’ve had an absolutely amazing year, Spartans!

When the time came for us to select the Best of 2012, it was super tough to choose just 10!

We would like to send a huge thanks to everyone who visited all of our online channels, whether it was our news, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn or Pinterest pages.

We counted up all your clicks, likes, pins and tweets and SJSU’s 2012 Olympian Marti Malloy came out on top. Read her story and join us on Pinterest to add a comment.

Ripped From the Headlines

Many more of our top stories were ripped right out of the headlines, with students loving the passage of Prop. 30 and the tuition rollback that came along with it.

Our football team making it to the Military Bowl also touched off an avalanche of national media coverage.

Whether led by an enterprising professor or intrepid students, campus research boomed with a $73.3 million NASA grant and a mind-boggling motorcycle with spherical wheels.

We also scored in the U.S. News & World Report College Rankings, coming in ninth overall among the West’s top public universities.

Enriching the Educational Experience

Student life thrived, too. In May, two undergrads and two graduate students from the class of 2012 earned accolades for their outstanding work.

This summer, we welcomed incoming frosh with a super fun orientation program followed this fall by our largest career fair in five years.

We even set the stage for 2013, launching an initiative to roll out a whole bunch of online tools enriching the educational experience here at SJSU.

Stay tuned because things can only get better next year!

Research Vessel Departs for Antarctica

Research Vessel Departs for Antarctica

Research Vessel Departs for Antarctica

Point Sur off the Moss Landing coast during the summer (MLML photo).

Under the darkening skies of approaching winter storms, the research vessel Point Sur departed for an 8,200-mile trip south. Final destination: Palmer Station, Antarctica. So begins the latest adventure for Moss Landing Marine Laboratories’ 135-foot, 495 ton flagship and her dedicated crew, to support the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs and the scientists studying the habitat, chemistry, climate, biology, geology and physics of the Antarctic Peninsula around the U.S. base at Palmer Station. MLML is home to the master’s of marine science program for seven CSU campuses, including SJSU, which serves as administrator. Read the full news release on the Point Sur expedition. View media coverage of the trip. Track the vessel online. Check out more on research at SJSU.

Professor Emeritus Studies Deep-Sea Wonder

Professor Emeritus Studies Deep-Sea Wonder

This brightly colored anglerfish is the topic of a newly published study co-authored by Moss Landing Marine Laboratories Professor Emeritus Gregor M. Cailliet.

Cailliet worked with colleagues from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

“While scientists have observed other species of anglerfish in the wild before, this particular species—Chaunacops coloratus—wasn’t documented alive until 2002,” explains the National Geographic Daily News website. “The 2002 sighting was of a single fish found near a seamount, or extinct volcano, about 80 miles southwest of Monterey.

“In 2010, an expedition to the nearby Taney Seamounts found six more—enough to support a proper investigation of the species…which can walk and changes color throughout its life,” National Geographic continues. You can learn more about Chaunacops coloratus in the journal Deep-Sea Research Part I.

You can learn more about experts including Cailliet on the CSU Fresca website, where he writes “for more than four decades, since my graduate work at UCSB in the 1960s, I have studied the ecology of marine fishes. I have been especially interested in deep-sea fishes and their ecology…

“For my deep-sea studies, I have mainly utilized surface ships for trawling and trapping activities, but more recently have been more involved with in situ camera sled, remotely operated vehicle, and submersible studies.”

Moss Landing Marine Laboratories is home to the master’s of marine science program for seven CSU campuses, including SJSU, which serves as administrator.

SJSU Satellite Launches From International Space Station

SJSU Satellite Launches From International Space Station

SJSU Satellite Launches From International Space Station

With NASA support, a team of SJSU aerospace engineering students worked on a cube satellite called TechEdSat, part of a group of cube satellites that were deployed from the International Space Station, October 4. An Expedition 33 crew member aboard the ISS captured this image of deployment.

Posted by NASA Oct. 4, 2012.

NASA engineers, student interns and amateur radio enthusiasts around the world are listening for signals from a small, cube-shaped satellite launched into orbit from the International Space Station Thursday.

The satellite, dubbed “TechEdSat,” was released at 11:44 a.m. EDT from the new Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Deployer aboard the space station.

TechEdSat measures about 4 inches (10 centimeters) on a side and carries a ham radio transmitter. It was developed by a group of student interns from the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering with mentoring and support from staff at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. TechEdSat arrived at the space station aboard the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle July 21 and the station’s Expedition 33 crew processed it for launch.

“TechEdSat will evaluate plug-and-play technologies, like avionics designed by commercial providers, and will allow a group of very talented aerospace engineering students from San Jose State University to experience a spaceflight project from formulation through decommission of a small spacecraft,” said Ames Director S. Pete Worden.

TechEdSat’s mission showcases collaboration among NASA, academia and industry to set the standard for future endeavors with small satellites known as Cubesats.

TechEdSat is funded by Ames and NASA’s Space Technology Program. The total cost was less than $30,000 because engineers used only commercial off-the-shelf hardware and simplified the design and mission objectives.

Watch an SJSU video profiling a recent graduate who worked on the project. 

For more about TechEdSat, visit SJSU’s site about the mission.

For more about Ames Research Center.

For more information about NASA education programs.

A Celebration of SJSU Research

A Celebration of SJSU Research

A Celebration of SJSU Research

Professor of Chemistry Lionel Cheruzel has been tremendously productive in his field of bioinorganic chemistry. He leads an active research group comprised of eight undergraduate students and one graduate student focused on Cytochrome P450 and the synthetic potential for biotechnological applications (photo courtesy of SJSU Research Foundation).

President Mohammad Qayoumi, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn, and Research Foundation Chief Operating Office Mary Sidney cordially invite you to “A Celebration of SJSU Sponsored Research” 3-5 p.m. Oct. 18 in the Student Union’s Barrett Ballroom. Join the entire SJSU community in a celebration of campus-wide research endeavors. Visit research program exhibits. Enjoy presentations by Early Career Investigator Awardees Dr. Lionel Cheruzel (College of Science) and Dr. Lili Luo (College of Applied Sciences and Arts). Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Raja Ampur Coral Triangle 2 photo Lakshmi Sawitri

NSF Grant Funds Marine Biodiversity Research

Raja Ampat Coral Triangle 2 photo Lakshmi Sawitri

Raja Ampat Coral Triangle, Indonesia (photo by Lakshmi Sawitri, Flickr Creative Commons)

Moss Landing Marine Laboratories Professor Jonathan Geller to conduct invertebrate metagenomic analyses and lead workshops for Indonesian and U.S. graduate students

Media contacts:
Brynn Hooton-Kaufman, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, (831) 771-4464
Dr. Jonathan Geller, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, (831) 771-4436

Moss Landing, Calif. – 18 September 2012 – A partnership of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, San Diego State University, UCLA, the Smithsonian Institute and NOAA has been awarded $4.87 million from the National Science Foundation to study marine biodiversity in Indonesia.  Funded by NSF’s Partnerships in International Research and Education program, the project will focus on the Coral Triangle, a region that contains the world’s most biologically diverse coral reefs.

Reefs of the Coral Triangle are an extremely important biological and economic resource locally and globally, but are severely threatened by human impacts and climate change.  As such, these reefs are important conservation targets.  The new project, titled “Assembly of marine biodiversity along geographic and anthropogenic stress gradients,” will use a novel monitoring tool called Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) to study the impacts of these threats. ARMS are particularly good at capturing the hidden biodiversity that comprises the vast majority of marine biodiversity, including viruses, microbes, smaller animals and algae.  For the project, the ARMS will measure what organisms are present in reefs across the Indonesian Archipelago, how the biodiversity of these organisms changes over different areas and how biodiversity is impacted by human-caused environmental stress.

NSF Awards $4.87 Million to Study Marine Biodiversity in the Coral Triangle

Professor Jonathan Geller

Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) Professor Jonathan Geller is an important part of the partnership, spearheading MLML’s role and conducting invertebrate metagenomic analyses for the project.  Metagenomics is the study of genetic material collected directly from environmental samples, which in the case of the new project, will be collected by the ARMS.  In addition, Dr. Geller will also lead workshops in these methods for Indonesian and U.S. graduate students.

The benefits of the project are threefold.  First, the information collected during the project will help scientists better understand what affects biodiversity in the Coral Triangle, and this knowledge that can be used to help resource managers protect the valuable coral reef ecosystems.  Second, the project will also bring an international collaboration to Indonesia, one of the world’s most populous developing countries, increasing the nation’s scientific capacity. Third, the project will prepare U.S. post-doctoral scholars, graduate and undergraduate students to be global leaders in the science of marine biodiversity, capable of international research in the world’s most diverse marine environments.

Dr. Geller is looking forward to collaborating with the project partners and to sharing his expertise with students.  “This is an amazing opportunity to apply state of the art technology to the ocean’s most diverse habitats. With these new tools, we will measure marine biodiversity with unprecedented depth and breadth,” he said.  “I am especially excited that our team, including MLML graduate students, will be working closely with Indonesian scientists and students – this will be a true partnership.”

Moss Landing Marine Laboratories is home to the master’s of marine science program for seven CSU campuses, including SJSU, which serves as administrator.

 

 

Chemistry Unlocks the Key to How Wildflowers Beat Wildfires

female research student wearing safety google and blue latex glove. She is holding a flask sample of a solution she's purfied

In the lab, researcher Jia Lu separates and tests the components of a karrikin solution, giving her insight into how to improve the process (Christina Olivas photo).

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

Did you know that there are certain plants that grow more abundantly or only after a fire?

Deer Weed, Ithuriel’s Spear and Whispering Bells are examples of what Department of Chemistry Professor Daniel Straus calls “fire-followers.”

“These plants can lay dormant in the soil for 100 years, but after an intense fire, chemicals soak the soil and germinate seeds, causing them to grow,” Straus explained.

Straus studies compounds that affect the germination of geophytes, bulb plants that adapt to unfavorable climates and conditions, even blazing hot wildfires.

Professor Straus is specifically interested in reproducing the highly active germination stimulant karrikin, a molecule discovered in Australia less than 10 years ago and produced amid the smoke and water of wildfires.

“It can take up to two months to purify,” said researcher Jia Lu, ’11 forensic science. “So far I can make only a couple of milligrams because there are so many steps, but the process is getting better.”

Whispering Bells are among the wildflowers resilient after wildfires (californiachaparral.com photo).

Whispering Bells are entirely fire dependent (californiachaparral.com photo)

Learning From “Fire-Followers”

Field studies on how the reproduced karakin compound affects germination have been conducted at Henry W. Coe State Park. Modifying the process to make more karakin faster raises a new question: Would the substance have the same effect on vegetative plants, such as crop plants?

Straus is currently working with the Carnegie Institute for Science’s Department of Global Ecology on a first batch of tests focusing on flowering responses in bulb plants.

“So far there is a very strong vegetative response,” Straus said. “We’re noticing plants watered with the karrikin solution were growing very vigorously in comparison to the plants not watered with karrikin. That’s exciting, and worth trying on other kinds of plants.”

Assistant Professors of Chemistry and Library and Information Science Honored

Assistant Professors of Chemistry and Library and Information Science Honored

An assistant professor of chemistry whose research focuses on one of the most challenging reactions in organic chemistry and an assistant professor of library and information science whose innovative work includes a partnership with the School of Social Work are the recipients of the 2012 SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Awards. The honor recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty members who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Here is the official announcement.

***

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Lionel Cheruzel from the College of Science, and Dr. Lili Luo from the College of Applied Sciences and Arts have both been chosen to receive the San José State University Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award for 2012.  Their selection is made at the recommendation of the Early Career Investigator Subcommittee of the Research Foundation Board of Directors.

The SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Our two recipients are outstanding examples of individuals who have achieved this level of success.

Lionel Cheruzel

Lionel Cheruzel

Dr. Lionel Cheruzel, in his third year at SJSU, has been tremendously productive in his field of bioinorganic chemistry.  Since joining the Department of Chemistry, he has successfully competed for multiple grant awards totaling $480,000. These grants have come from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Research Corporation, and the CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology. In addition to an impressive record of grantsmanship, Dr. Cheruzel has become a valued member of the SJSU faculty through a combination of excellence in teaching and research. Dr. Cheruzel currently leads an active research group comprised of eight undergraduate students and one graduate student. He and his group are focused on Cytochrome P450, and the synthetic potential for biotechnological applications. More on the Cheruzel Research Group can be found at www.sjsu.edu/cheruzel. Dr. Cheruzel has made significant contributions to the development of knowledge in his field as evidenced by his strong publication record with three publications in peer reviewed journals since joining the faculty and one publication currently in review.

Lili Luo

Lili Luo

Dr. Lili Luo, also in her third year at SJSU, has demonstrated an outstanding record of scholarship that has been recognized by federal grant funders. Her work has resulted in several invitations for collaborative research with SJSU scholars, as well as with scholars from external organizations. Since joining the faculty of the School of Library and Information Science, Dr. Luo has been an active researcher in the area of reference services, online learning, and research methods education. In 2010, Dr. Luo received a $122,683 grant award from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services to conduct the first in-depth research regarding text reference services.  Dr. Luo’s scholarly activities also include a partnership with the SJSU School of Social Work, conducting joint research to explore how librarians and social workers can collaborate to improve access to information regarding local social service resources.  Dr. Luo has presented her findings in publications and at professional and scholarly conferences, and was invited to present findings at the International Federation of Library Associations this summer.  Dr. Luo has published eight journal articles since joining the faculty and in 2010 received the Outstanding Teacher’s Award from the School of Library and Information Science.

The SJSU Research Foundation has established two Early Career Investigator Awards in order to encourage participation beyond those colleges where large numbers of faculty have traditionally participated. One award goes to a faculty member in the Colleges of Science and Engineering and another is made to a faculty member from all other colleges. Each awardee will receive a cash award of $1,000 to be used at their discretion.

Professors Honored for Early Career Research

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

An assistant professor of chemistry whose research focuses on one of the most challenging reactions in organic chemistry and an assistant professor of library and information science whose innovative work includes a partnership with the School of Social Work are the recipients of the 2012 SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Awards. The honor recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty members who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Here is the official announcement.

***

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Lionel Cheruzel from the College of Science, and Dr. Lili Luo from the College of Applied Sciences and Arts have both been chosen to receive the San José State University Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award for 2012.  Their selection is made at the recommendation of the Early Career Investigator Subcommittee of the Research Foundation Board of Directors.

The SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Our two recipients are outstanding examples of individuals who have achieved this level of success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lionel Cheruzel

Lionel Cheruzel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Lionel Cheruzel, in his third year at SJSU, has been tremendously productive in his field of bioinorganic chemistry.  Since joining the Department of Chemistry, he has successfully competed for multiple grant awards totaling $480,000. These grants have come from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Research Corporation, and the CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology. In addition to an impressive record of grantsmanship, Dr. Cheruzel has become a valued member of the SJSU faculty through a combination of excellence in teaching and research. Dr. Cheruzel currently leads an active research group comprised of eight undergraduate students and one graduate student. He and his group are focused on Cytochrome P450, and the synthetic potential for biotechnological applications. More on the Cheruzel Research Group can be found at www.sjsu.edu/cheruzel. Dr. Cheruzel has made significant contributions to the development of knowledge in his field as evidenced by his strong publication record with three publications in peer reviewed journals since joining the faculty and one publication currently in review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lili Luo

Lili Luo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Lili Luo, also in her third year at SJSU, has demonstrated an outstanding record of scholarship that has been recognized by federal grant funders. Her work has resulted in several invitations for collaborative research with SJSU scholars, as well as with scholars from external organizations. Since joining the faculty of the School of Library and Information Science, Dr. Luo has been an active researcher in the area of reference services, online learning, and research methods education. In 2010, Dr. Luo received a $122,683 grant award from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services to conduct the first in-depth research regarding text reference services.  Dr. Luo’s scholarly activities also include a partnership with the SJSU School of Social Work, conducting joint research to explore how librarians and social workers can collaborate to improve access to information regarding local social service resources.  Dr. Luo has presented her findings in publications and at professional and scholarly conferences, and was invited to present findings at the International Federation of Library Associations this summer.  Dr. Luo has published eight journal articles since joining the faculty and in 2010 received the Outstanding Teacher’s Award from the School of Library and Information Science.

The SJSU Research Foundation has established two Early Career Investigator Awards in order to encourage participation beyond those colleges where large numbers of faculty have traditionally participated. One award goes to a faculty member in the Colleges of Science and Engineering and another is made to a faculty member from all other colleges. Each awardee will receive a cash award of $1,000 to be used at their discretion.

Students Present Digital Humanities Project

Students Present Digital Humanities Project

Jesus Espinoza and Pollyanna Macchiano at the Re: Humanities symposium on digital media in academia at Swarthmore College (Bryn Mawr/Jay Gorodetzer photo).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

English majors Jesus Espinoza and Pollyanna Macchiano presented “Project Beard-stair” at Re:humanities, a symposium on digital media in academia held this spring at Swarthmore College.

The project focuses on three books Espinoza found while working at King Library. The books were dropped in the return bin, but were not part of the library’s collection.

After flipping through each volume, Espinoza was intrigued, and took the books to Assistant Professor Katherine D. Harris of the of Department of English and Comparative Literature.

The professor’s research and teaching interests include British Romanticism and Hypertextual and Digital Studies. She is an early proponent of a growing field known as digital humanities.

Espinoza’s find proved to be valuable, early 20th century art books. Using Twitter, Harris helped Espinoza pull together a research team, including Macchiano, Collette, English graduate student Doll Piccotto, and School of Library and Information Science graduate student Colette Hayes.

Project Beard-stair represents their collective effort to digitize, archive, exhibit and research the books outside the confines of a traditional research paper. They also participated in the SJSU Student Research Competition.

“The enthusiasm we share for this project is something that we want to translate to the classroom — a different way to experience coursework and a new and exciting way to experience scholarship as a whole,” the students wrote.

Ngoc-Han Tran

College of Science Research Day Set for May 11

College of Science Research Day Showcases Work by 130 Students and 36 Faculty Members

The College of Science Research Day will showcase work by 130 students and 36 faculty members

By Professor of Chemistry Roy Okuda

The Eighth Annual College of Science Student Research Day will be held Friday, May 11, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the breezeway of Duncan Hall.

The event displays how San Jose State excels in providing students with the hands-on research lab experience they will need on the job and in graduate school.

This year, we have 65 posters, the largest number so far, from all College of Science departments.

Over 130 students will be presenters, representing the research of 36 College of Science faculty members.

Besides the posters, Assistant Professor Craig Clements and his group will display their new truck.

This innovative mobile sensing station will be used to monitor weather conditions during wildfires.

Wildfire Researcher Receives $900,000 National Science Foundation Grant

Wildfire Researcher Receives $900,000 NSF Grant

Wildfire Researcher Receives $900,000 National Science Foundation Grant

Clements and his student researchers will use this custom-designed mobile atmospheric profiling system to develop a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for wildfire-atmosphere interactions (Rie Onodera image).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

Craig Clements, an assistant professor with the Department of Meteorology and Climate Science, has received a $900,000 National Science Foundation grant to continue his groundbreaking research on wildfire weather.

The funding will allow Clements to obtain new observations from a comprehensive field program tracking wildfire-atmosphere dynamics, and to integrate these observations into education and community outreach.

In practical terms, this means Clements and his team of student researchers now have the funding needed to deploy their mobile atmospheric profiling system, a truck pulling a compact trailer loaded with the latest tech tools. These tools includes lidar and sodar, which use light and sound waves to track winds.

The grant will allow the team to chase wildfires (in a safe way, of course!) throughout the West. Their overall goal is to learn more about the super dynamic atmospheric conditions inside and around blazes so we can better predict wildfire behavior, saving lives and property.

Clements received this grant through The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program, the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award in support of junior faculty members nationwide.

In 2011, Professor Clements received the SJSU Research Foundation‘s Early Career Investigator Award, which recognizes tenure-track faculty members who excel in research, scholarship and creative activity, and have secured funds for research early in their careers.

Here’s his NSF project summary.

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PROJECT SUMMARY

The career development plan (CDP) represents an ambitious effort to advance the understanding of wildfire-atmosphere dynamics by obtaining new observations from a comprehensive field program and integrating these observations into education and community outreach. The key objectives of the CDP are:

(1) To develop a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for
wildfire-atmosphere interactions and how these processes influence fire behavior.
(2) To improve student understanding of fire weather science through the development of an innovative fire science and fire safety outreach and education program.

The research component of the CDP, which expands on the PI’s field measurement experience, seeks to identify the processes responsible for fire-atmosphere interactions that affect fire behavior. The research methods are based on executing an intensive measurement program that incorporates carefully planned experiments with rapid-deploy wildfire monitoring (RaDFIRE) using the newly NSF funded CSU-MAPS, mobile atmospheric profiling system. The observational dataset will be used to study:

  • The dynamics of fire-induced winds and their impact on fire behavior.
  • The thermodynamic structure of fire plumes and the near-surface environment.

The education component of the CDP is a plan designed to build a university program in fire weather research that links San José State University and the community. This component will integrate fire weather content into general education courses, improve 6th grade science learning through a teacher training workshop, and develop fire danger awareness among students living in fire danger zones by providing a novel and modern fire safety education program. The component concepts are:

  • Integration of fire weather content into university courses.
  • K-12 Teacher Training workshop called Weather of Wildfires.
  • Red-Flag Days: A community outreach program for middle schools in the Wildland-Urban Interface aimed at providing fire safety education.

Intellectual merit. The proposed CDP will potentially transform wildfire research by measuring critical wildfire-atmosphere properties that have rarely been observed. This will provide the first comprehensive data set for the validation of coupled atmosphere-fire modeling systems. New observations of extreme fire-induced winds and plume thermodynamic structure will lead to major advances in knowledge and understanding of wildfire dynamics. Resources at the PI’s institution including CSU-MAPS are adequate for the proposed work. Educational activities are developed to improve student understanding of fire weather processes by developing new teacher training modules and a novel middle-school program aimed at fire danger awareness with the use of red flags as fire weather props.

Broader impacts. The expected outcomes of the proposed CDP include:

  • Greater understanding of critical fire-atmosphere processes responsible for extreme fire behavior.
  • Increased firefighter and public safety from the development of better prediction tools.
  • Support for graduate and undergraduate students and postdoctoral training.
  • Integrated university curriculum on fire weather and teacher training program.
  • Improved fire danger awareness targeted to students at underrepresented middle schools.
  • Field program will provide unique hands-on training for graduate and undergraduate students.