Making an Impact on Earth Day and Beyond: A Conversation with Climate Scientist Eugene Cordero

Eugene Cordero and the Green Ninja

Eugene Cordero is a climate scientist and professor in the Department of Meteorology and Climate Science. He is also the founder and director of the Green Ninja Project, an educational initiative that supports teachers and students with digital media and curricula designed around climate science and solutions. Photo: David Schmitz

We’re big fans of Earth Day here at San José State. After all, the founder of the annual celebration is a Spartan. So we’re looking for ways to reduce our carbon footprint on April 22 and beyond.

Eugene Cordero — SJSU professor of meteorology and climate science and fellow Earth advocate — has some great ideas for how we can all make a difference in protecting our environment. Whether it’s opting for chicken instead of carne asada on his burrito or choosing a bicycle as a primary mode of transportation, Cordero stresses that even the smallest changes can make a difference.

But there are ways to make a big impact, too, Cordero says — through the power of education.

Cordero’s research published last year found that students who enrolled in a university course that educated them on ways to reduce their carbon footprint adopted environmentally friendly practices that they kept for years down the line. Cordero is also the creator of Green Ninja, a comprehensive curriculum that uses solutions to environmental problems as a framework for teaching science and engineering to middle school students.

He wants to see education about protecting the environment more widely adopted — both at the university level and as early as middle school. We asked Cordero about the wider implications of his research and how we can all be Earth advocates — on Earth Day and beyond.

Last year, you published research that illustrated the impact universities can have on climate change through education. What surprised you most about your findings?

Eugene Cordero (EC): I was actually quite surprised to see how the course really had an impact on students, even many years later. The data that we collected and the stories we heard from alumni demonstrated that educational experiences, if well-designed, can have a lasting impact on students’ lives.

The study centered around one two-semester course at San José State, Global Climate Change I and II. What about this course sets itself apart?

EC: We identified three elements in the course that stood out as significant contributors to the lasting impact it had.

First, it made climate change personal, helping students understand how climate change was relevant to their personal and professional lives.

Second, it provided empowerment opportunities: Students developed projects where they created their own local solutions to climate change.

And third, it encouraged empathy for the environment — creating opportunities for students to observe and connect with living things.

The course also had a unique format as it was taught over a year (six units in the first semester, three units in the second) and used an interdisciplinary approach with three faculty from different departments team-teaching the course.

You have said it’s important to bring this type of education to a younger audience. What impact could that have?

EC: Our analysis suggests that this type of education, if scaled appropriately, could be as important in reducing carbon emissions as rooftop solar panels or electric vehicles. So for us, the big take-home message from this research is that climate-action plans need to include education as part of the strategies being used to reduce carbon emissions.

Are there other SJSU courses or programs you’d recommend for a student who wants to learn more about reducing their carbon footprint?

EC: SJSU has a lot of amazing courses where students can learn about the environment and what we can do to support a more sustainable world. These range from the courses we offer in our Department of Meteorology and Climate Science, to courses in Environmental Studies, Public Health and even Business. Students could take a look at this listing from our Office of Sustainability as a starting point.

Can you share about other ongoing or upcoming research?

EC: Our research program continues to look for innovative ways to educate and empower our youth in the area of climate and environmental solutions. We recently completed a study where students used data from their smartphone to coach drivers in their family towards more energy efficient driving behaviors, such as reducing driving speed and reducing the frequency of hard accelerations and hard brakes.

In the past, you’ve emphasized that our food choices can help reduce our carbon footprint. We love your example of the difference in carbon emissions when ordering chicken instead of beef in a burrito. Are there other ways the food we eat can make a difference?

EC: I think food choices are a great way to think about our personal carbon footprint since we have a lot of control over what we eat. We don’t always get the opportunity to purchase a new car or choose how to power our homes, but we typically get the chance to choose what we eat every day, and these choices can make a really large impact on our personal carbon footprint.

For example, choosing a diet lower in red meat and dairy can reduce our carbon footprint a similar amount as switching to a very fuel efficient vehicle. I also find learning about food — how it’s grown and the social and environmental impacts — to be fascinating!

We are seeing more effects of climate change every day. Standing up for the environment can sometimes feel like fighting a winless battle. Is there anything we can do to really make an impact as individuals?

EC: I understand that it’s a huge problem, and many of us feel helpless to make any real change. But I’d like to encourage people to believe in their power to create change, and just start.

Writing a persuasive letter to a lawmaker, attending a city council or school board meeting, getting involved in a local group that supports the environment — these are all ways we can get involved to make a difference. We can’t just sit on the sidelines and expect things to get better, we need more folks involved in advocating for and creating change.

I think if we do this, we can stop climate change, and we can make real progress towards a more equitable and habitable planet.

We also hear a lot of bad news or about how bad things can happen if we don’t make change fast. Is there any good news out there?

EC: There are a lot of committed people and groups working on climate change, but for me, the really good recent news is the U.S. government appears to be finally taking climate change seriously. We need individuals pushing for change, but having the government open to such changes is really a game changer.

What, if any, impact has the COVID-19 pandemic had on fighting climate change?

EC: I believe the pandemic has demonstrated that technology can help us connect in ways that can reduce our need to travel as much as we did in the past. Do we need to attend a physical workplace every day? Do we need to attend every conference physically, or could a remote meeting accomplish similar outcomes in some cases?

Certainly, there have been reductions in transportation-related carbon emissions as a result of the pandemic, and moving forward, this experience now offers us more options for how and when we do travel for work in the future.

What has the pandemic taught us about the impact we can have as individuals when a big issue faces us collectively?

EC: For me, it was amazing to see how science and policy worked together so quickly to create solutions to the pandemic. It didn’t go perfectly for sure, but having a vaccine out within a year and already distributed to hundreds of millions of people is really amazing.

If we can develop a similar focus on climate change, we can absolutely respond to climate change.

Want to learn more about Cordero’s research? Take a look at One Carbon Footprint at a Time, a documentary that highlights his findings.

Trashion Fashion

Associated Students hosted a Trashion Fashion Show the evening of April 23 in the Campus Village quad. The event raises awareness by inviting students to create and model their own garments made from at least 80 percent post-consumer materials. Students modeled trendy spring styles provided by a local recycled clothing store. And Carlos Escobar picked up the Greenest Greek Award on behalf of Delta Sigma Phi, which clocked the lowest carbon footprint per capita among all fraternities and sororities.

 

U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren with SJSU students in group photo behind large table.

U.S. Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren Visits SJSU Seeking Student Input on Sustainability

Lofgren with students

U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren meets with SJSU students to discuss sustainability. Photo courtesy of Environment California.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

While Big Wheels roared around a race track and students crowded an outdoor fair elsewhere, a studious but powerful group gathered to mark Earth Day.

Around 30 of SJSU’s best and brightest met April 21 with U.S. Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren, attracted by the opportunity to affect change in the nation’s capital.

The event was sponsored by the SJSU Environmental Resource Center, the Office of the President’s Sustainability Initiative, and Environment California.

Lofgren sought “feedback” and to “bridge the gap” between young people here and her colleagues in Washington D.C.

A member of the House Committee on Science and Technology, she was well prepared to tackle just about anything students presented to her during the one-hour conversation.

The Invisibility of Climate Change

While the topics varied from nuclear power to ethanol to oil extraction fees, the group spent the most time on what geology major Ian Newman described as the “invisibility” of climate change.

Vice President Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth” convinced millions worldwide of the effects of global warming on the environment.

But some of Lofgren’s colleagues in Washington continue to refute the science, perhaps because they can’t see the impacts in their own backyards.

“We are in a situation where the science is going this way, and the politics is going that way,” she said. “Obviously, we need to get things back on track.”

Lofgren also observed the situation is almost “too terrifying to contemplate,” and, like many long-term problems, gets pushed away given more immediate worries.

Tremendous Progress

Still, the congresswoman encouraged students to think creatively, noting that “promoting sensible projects locally makes a big difference.”

She also made a very positive observation, mentioning the United States has come a long way since Earth Day was founded 41 years ago by the late Senator Gaylord Nelson, an SJSU alumnus.

The whole concept of environmentalism has gone from fringe to mainstream, sweeping up lawmakers, academics and scientists as well as everyday people.

“Though we have tremendous challenges,” Lofgren said, “we’ve made tremendous progress.”

Earth Day @ SJSU

Mayor Chuck Reed to Speak on San José’s Green Vision During Sustainability Week at SJSU

View a Sustainability Week event schedule.

Contact: Lynne Trulio, 650-740-9446, Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748

SAN JOSÉ, Calif., — In celebration of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, San José Mayor Chuck Reed will give the keynote address for Sustainability Week at 3:15 p.m. Thursday, April 22, in Engineering 189. Continue reading