SJSU Celebrates 20th Anniversary of Center for Community Learning and Leadership

It takes a community to build a service-learning legacy: Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education Thalia Anagnos, CCLL Director Elena Klaw, CCLL Founding Director Debra David and former CCLL Director Michael Fallon. Photo: Robert Bain.

SJSU’s Bowling Center.

Attendees of the celebration bowled together at SJSU’s Diaz Compean Student Union Bowling Center, illustrating how CCLL ensures students and community members do not “bowl alone,” in the words of Robert Putnam. Photo: Robert Bain.

San Jose State University’s Center for Community Learning and Leadership (CCLL) commemorated 20 years of curriculum-based service-learning at an event on February 6 in the Diaz Compean Student Union Bowling Center. Over the past 20 years, 80,000 SJSU students have contributed 1.4 million hours of service to the community as part of their coursework.

Having the event at SJSU’s Bowling Center was a nod to Robert D. Putnam’s Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, a book that served as a catalyst for service-learning infrastructure on university campuses, explained CCLL Director Elena Klaw. In the book, Putnam described the precipitous decline of all the forms of in-person social relationships that once formed the basis of Americans’ lives and provided opportunities for enrichment and education.

“Instead of joining leagues in activities like bowling, we bowl alone, missing civic discussions that might occur in a club or a local association. Putnam suggested that service-learning programs are a primary solution to the problems of bowling alone,” said Klaw. “The antidote to apathy, isolation and disregard is education and civic involvement.”

SJSU President Mary A. Papazian shared highlights from the center’s programming, including the AmeriCorps Bridging Borders Program, which brought $3 million in federal funding to the campus over a span of nine years; the Students Helping in the Naturalization of Elders (SHINE) program; the Veterans Embracing Transition (VET) project; and the SJSU Chapter of Students Demand Action (SDA), developed to provide students the opportunity to support the mission of Everytown USA in advocating for common sense laws that promote gun safety and reduce violence.

President Mary A. Papazian and Elena Klaw.

President Mary A. Papazian and CCLL Director Elena Klaw celebrated 20 years of SJSU service-learning. Photo: Robert Bain.

“In many ways, CCLL is the embodiment of everything we hope to achieve with our students at San Jose State” said Papazain. “Educating students about how they can most effectively influence change on issues that matter to them is what our Center for Community Learning and Leadership is all about.”

In addition to San Jose State Academic Senate Chair Ravisha Mathur, who presented a Sense of the Senate, entitled “Celebrating 20 Years of Service-Learning at San Jose State University,” the center welcomed CCLL Founding Director Debra David, former CCLL staff members, and community partners, without whom many programs would not be possible. A representative of the city of San Jose presented a commendation on behalf of San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, Councilmember Raul Peralez (District 3) and other members of the City Council.

To the crowd gathered in SJSU’s Bowling Center, President Papazian revealed that SJSU would announce receipt of $566,288 in grant funding for a one-year pilot California Volunteers AmeriCorps Service Fellowship program at a Feb. 10 press conference in the California state capitol. For the pilot year of the AmeriCorps Service Fellowship, San Jose State’s Civic Engagement Fellows will build on CCLL’s current Cyber Spartans program, addressing educational equity needs within the city of San Jose. Since launching in 2018, 26 Cyber Spartans have mentored 75 underserved youths, teaching them cyber skills. In turn, they use what they learn to create engaging computer programs. With the new grant funding, these numbers are expected to increase substantially.

“CCLL’s own program of research shows that community initiatives boost civic participation, academic engagement and career readiness for students,” said SJSU Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Vincent Del Casino, representing SJSU at the press conference in Sacramento. “San Jose State is always looking for ways to expand or create initiatives that develop our students as leaders in the diverse sectors of Silicon Valley.

At the anniversary celebration, CCLL named SJSU kinesiology major Erika Lisina the Service-Learning and Community Engagement Student of the Year. Described as a “devoted resource for students,” Lisina volunteers at SJSU’s Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library as a homework coach.

“Students are the reason we’re here,” said Klaw. “CCLL’s service-learning does not add to education. We are the education.”

Mumford and Sons Funds SJSU Service Fellowship

Photo: Joel Simon Images

San Jose State University’s Martha Heasley Cox Center for Steinbeck Studies honored the British folk-rock band Mumford and Sons with the annual John Steinbeck Award on September 18, 2019 at a sold-out event in Stanford University’s Bing Concert Hall. Proceeds of the event funded a new Steinbeck Service Fellowship that encourages engaged collaboration between students at SJSU and Stanford.

The service program launches in the summer of 2020, and current SJSU undergraduates are eligible to apply for the fellowship until February 29, 2020.

The fellowship is funded by “Gentlemen of the Road,” the community organization the band founded in 2006, which connects with communities that share its passion for social justice and common good around the world.

Every year, San Jose State’s Center for Steinbeck Studies presents the John Steinbeck Award, celebrating writers, thinkers, artists and activists who embody Steinbeck’s commitment to social justice.

Mumford and Sons is the first musical band to receive the Steinbeck Award, and also its youngest recipients to date. The award ceremony featured a conversation with the band members, as well as an acoustic performance.

It was a fitting venue since 2019 marked the 100th anniversary of Steinbeck beginning his college studies at Stanford. The band’s pianist Ben Lovett also was an undergraduate at Stanford for a year, studying astrophysics before he left to become a musician.

In its inaugural year, the fellowship will bring together students from San Jose State and Stanford to engage in a summer of reflective writing and community service in California’s Salinas Valley, the land that birthed and shaped Steinbeck’s creative vision.

The unique and celebratory aspect of the fellowship is the intersection of English literature and community service—one that was championed by Steinbeck throughout his lifetime.

Professor of English and Director of SJSU’s Center for Steinbeck Studies Nick Taylor teamed up with his colleague Professor Gavin Jones from Stanford to design the fellowship and propose the idea to the band. The two professors decided to model the fellowship on the Cardinal Quarter at Stanford, a program of the Haas Center for Public Service that pays students a stipend so they can engage in a quarter or summer of service-learning projects in the community.

SJSU students will be able to apply though the Center for Steinbeck Studies and Stanford students will route their applications through the Haas Center.

Students who are chosen will work with their community partners at least 35 hours per week for nine consecutive weeks and receive a stipend of $5,500.

“We decided to do a pilot in summer 2020 with three students from San Jose State and three from Stanford. We are planning on assembling a cohort in February. It’s a great opportunity to bring students from SJSU and Stanford together. They are so close but don’t have much interaction,” said Taylor.

SJSU’s Center for Community Learning and Leadership (CCLL), celebrating two decades on campus, was also involved in the San Jose State iteration of the experience. CCLL supports classes that have a service-learning requirement embedded in the curriculum so students can apply what they are learning in the classroom by serving the community. Over the past 20 years, an  estimated 80,000 SJSU students have contributed more than 1,400,000 hours to the community through service-learning.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for our San Jose State students to receive funding for their service,” said Andrea Tully, CCLL assistant director. “In a recent study of SJSU service-learning alumni, we found that one of the biggest obstacles to their experience was being able to work, often full time, complete school work and serve. The stipend will likely alleviate some of the burden of needing to work and serve.”

Although the program will sync well with students studying American literature and social work, it is open to all SJSU and Stanford students across disciplines.

Professor of Psychology and CCLL Faculty Director Elena Klaw said the program also fits with SJSU’s ideals and objectives as a center. It emphasizes that academic learning and service should not be separate.

“The focus is to take Steinbeck’s scholarly work and bring it to life in real communities in which people are currently working. And there are still plenty of inequities to highlight, transform and address while engaging with Steinbeck’s fiction, both as a historical body of work but also as a literary body of work,” Klaw said.


Apply for the Fellowship

Get more information and apply for the Steinbeck/Gentlemen of the Road Service Fellowship by February 29, 2020.


Watch Mumford and Sons accept the 2019 Steinbeck Award

 

Cyber Spartans Encourage Next Generation of Coders

During March 2019, SJSU students mentored elementary school students while teaching them about cybersecurity as part of the Cyber Spartans program at Sherman Oaks Elementary School.

The Center for Community Learning and Leadership (CCLL) and the Jay Pison STEM Education Program partnered this spring to offer a unique afterschool program to students at Sherman Oaks Elementary School in the Campbell Union School District. Through the Cyber Spartan program SJSU students engaged as mentors and teachers to underserved youth while teaching them about cybersecurity and coding.

Luan Bao Dinh, ’19 MS Applied Mathematics, served as co-program manager of Cyber Spartans while taking courses and working as a graduate teaching associate in the math department. He graduates this spring, one of 1,816 students completing a master’s degree.

“Cyber Spartans is a program that uses already available kid-friendly computer languages like Scratch to teach underserved youth the cybersecurity content with integrated computer science concepts,” said Dinh, who helped to develop curriculum for the program. “My favorite part was when I had to create different modules in Scratch. I get to create these fun games while reviewing all of the computer science concepts I also need for my master thesis.”

Dinh also appreciated seeing how much the kids enjoyed the lessons.

SJSU students pose for a photo with elementary school children who participated in the month-long Cyber Spartan after school program.

SJSU students pose for a photo with elementary school children who participated in the month-long Cyber Spartan afterschool program.

Every Tuesday and Thursday in March, SJSU students met with the elementary school students from 3:30 to 5 p.m. for cybersecurity lessons and coding practice. The program initially received seed funding from Symantec, a company that produces cybersecurity products. The month-long afterschool program culminated with a visit from Cisco professionals who shared their experience working in cybersecurity as well as the importance of attending college in their success. SJSU’s Associate Professor of Psychology David Schuster, who has a National Science Foundation Career Award to study human factors in cybersecurity, moderated the panel.

“More students than ever have daily access to computers and the internet,” said Campbell Union School District Superintendent Shelly Viramontez. “Teaching them to think more about how they’re engaging with technology is a crucial life skill that our teachers reinforce daily. The SJSU Cyber Spartans partnership enhances and extends those lessons into the afterschool hours and the kids are really energized.”

Candice Lee, ’18 Psychology, was recruited to work as part of the Cyber Spartan team through Schuster’s VECTR Laboratory. In fact, she has been accepted into the master’s program for Human Factors/Ergonomics in the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering for fall 2019.

“The program was completely new to me, and I think it is incredibly meaningful and of service to our community,” Lee said. “Teaching and Exposing STEM-related fields, especially safe cybersecurity behaviors, will not only protect our future generation but perhaps spark some interest and curiosity in the future of technology.”

Lee said she especially appreciated the opportunity to see how a younger generation that has grown up with ready access to technology interacts and learns in different modes.

“They have different attention spans and different ways or modes of learning than I did when I was younger,” she said. “So adjusting the curriculum, the presentation or the pace of the educational materials was certainly an interesting challenge.”

Joanna Solis, a CSU STEM Volunteer in Service to America (VISTA) who works with CCLL and the Jay Pinson Stem Education Program, helped the SJSU team develop the curriculum and served as a liaison between the SJSU mentors and elementary students.

“As the program culminated seeing everyone’s happy faces is something I will always remember,” she said. “Seeing how close youth became with their mentors and the positive friendships that were established was very rewarding to see. Teaching youth cybersecurity concepts and having them relay back the information in their own words was a very satisfying experience.”

Center for Community Learning and Leadership Earns Community Award

 

SJSU's Center for Community Learning and Leadership received the 2019 Outstanding Community Partner Award from Third Street Community Center. Pictured here from left to right: Elena Klaw, CCLL faculty director and psychology professor, Rosemary Baez, executive director of Third Street Community Center and Patrick Day, vice president for Student Affairs pose for a photo as the SJSU program is recognized with a Community Photo by: Karen Guerrero, ’19 Communications

SJSU’s Center for Community Learning and Leadership received the 2019 Outstanding Community Partner Award from Third Street Community Center. Pictured here from left to right: Elena Klaw, CCLL faculty director and psychology professor, Rosemary Baez, executive director of Third Street Community Center and Patrick Day, vice president for Student Affairs pose for a photo.
Photo by: Karen Guerrero, ’19 Communications

San Jose State University’s Center for Community Learning and Leadership (CCLL) was recognized by the Third Street Community Center as its 2019 Outstanding Community Partner on Saturday, May 4. Vice President for Student Affairs Patrick Day joined faculty and staff members to accept the honor, which recognizes CCLL’s service learning and community engagement.

“We are honored that Third Street Community Center is recognizing the Center for Community Learning and Leadership and each college at San Jose State for our significant contributions,” said Psychology Professor Elena Klaw, who directs the CCLL, in addition to the Veterans Embracing Transition program. “Our center has partnered with Third Street Community Center for the past 19 years to educate, enrich, mentor and inspire downtown  youths through course-based service-learning.

During an event at Third Street Community Center, where SJSU's Center for Community Learning and Leadership received the 2019 Outstanding Community Partner Award, a group poses for a photo. Left to right: Avizia Long, assistant professor of World of Languages and Literatures, Kara Bench, SJSU Spanish student, Andrea Tully, CCLL coordinator, Sheryl Ehrman, dean of the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering, Patrick Day, vice president of student affairs, Elena Klaw, CCLL faculty director and psychology professor, Peggy Arana, CCLL administrative support coordinator, and Mei-Yan Lu, educational leadership professor. Photo by: Karen Guerrero, ’19 Communications

During an event at Third Street Community Center, where SJSU’s Center for Community Learning and Leadership received the 2019 Outstanding Community Partner Award, a group poses for a photo. Left to right: Avizia Long, assistant professor of World Languages and Literatures; Kara Bench, SJSU Spanish student; Andrea Tully, CCLL coordinator; Sheryl Ehrman, dean of the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering; Patrick Day, vice president of Student Affairs; Elena Klaw, CCLL faculty director and psychology professor; Peggy Arana, CCLL administrative support coordinator; and Mei-Yan Lu, educational leadership professor.
Photo by: Karen Guerrero, ’19 Communications

The Third Street Community Center provides comprehensive and enriching support to greater downtown San Jose youths, including college preparatory STEM education, peer role models and mentors, and family engagement in a safe and nurturing environment. Since 2010, SJSU has provided 1,518 service-learners to support academically at-risk children at the center. This year alone, SJSU students have provided more than 5,000 hours of service to academic enrichment programsmore than 70 percent of Third Street’s 2,102 volunteers since fall 2010. The Center for Community Learning and Leadership is proud to report that SJSU service-learning students provide 45,000 hours of service within the city of San Jose each year.

“The Center for Community Learning and Leadership has done an extraordinary job of providing service learning experiences for San Jose State University students,” said Day, who attended Saturday’s event. “Through their partnership with the Third Street Community Center, they have demonstrated an optimum example of community-engaged learning experiences that have a real impact on our neighbors in the city of San Jose.  The leadership of Professor Elena Klaw and the staff in CCLL are a hallmark of an innovative urban university.”

The CCLL is staffed by a team of three that supports curricular service learning and assessment at San Jose State: Klaw; Andrea Tully, community engagement coordinator, and Peggy Arana, administrative support coordinator.

 

SJSU and Community Partners Offer Students and Staff "Personal Finance 101"

SJSU and Community Partners Offer Students and Staff "Personal Finance 101"

SJSU and Community Partners Offer Students and Staff "Personal Finance 101"

Meriwest Credit Union and Phi Beta Sigma discussed credit myths at a recent ice cream social (photo courtesy of Gregory B. Meyer).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

What’s the hardest part about going to college? Paying for it! With that in mind, the Center for Community Learning and Leadership, in partnership with many more SJSU offices and financial institutions, has launched a free Money Management Workshop Series.

“The series offers all Spartans eye opening personal money management knowledge,” said Gregory B. Meyer, Meriwest Credit Union community relations manager. “You’ll learn about managing personal budgets, both for school and in your post-college life.”

Topics include:

  • Basics of banking
  • Building strong credit
  • Creating a budget
  • Avoiding identity theft

“Several dates are available to accommodate the school schedule. Start working towards your financial freedom this semester and sign up for these free classes today!” said Bethany Eggman, The Golden 1 Credit Union member education program manager.

Other banks involved include UWSV- Bank on SanJose, US Bank and Wells Fargo. Additional support will come from the ASPIRE and McNair programs, Bursar’s Office, Department of Economics, Educational Opportunities Program, and Financial Aid and Scholarship Office, with venues provided by Associated Students, Housing Services, King Library, Student Involvement, Student Success and the Student Union.

Here’s the full schedule of events, all of which are free.

September

9/19 Maintaining a Budget 10:30 a.m. (Golden 1) Clark 100H
9/19 Auto Purchasing and Financing 101 3 p.m. (Meriwest) King 255/257
9/24 Understanding Credit Cards 10:30 a.m. (Golden 1) Clark 100H
9/26 Identity Theft and Social Networking 10:30 a.m. (Golden 1) Clark 140F
9/26 Online Banking: Tips and Tricks 3 p.m. (Meriwest) Clark 140F
9/27 Credit Myth and Repair noon (Meriwest) King 225/229

October

10/01 Banking Basics 10:30 a.m. (US Bank) Clark 100H
10/01 Banking Basics 1:30 p.m. (UWSV) Clark 140F
10/02 Auto Purchasing and Financing 101 3 p.m. (Meriwest) Student Union Costanoan Room
10/10 Preventing Identity Theft for Students noon (Meriwest) A.S. House Boardroom
10/10 Banking Basics 3 p.m. (US Bank) Clark 140F
10/11 Basics of Checking/Savings 10:30 a.m. (Wells Fargo Bank) Clark 100H
10/11 Credit/Budgeting 3 p.m. (Wells Fargo Bank) CVB w/Whitney
10/15 Identity Theft 10:30 a.m. (US Bank) Clark 100H
10/15 Real World Budgets/ Life After College 3 p.m. (Meriwest) Clark 140F
10/16 Managing a Budget with Online Banking noon (Meriwest) Clark 140F
10/16 Introduction to Credit/How to Read Credit Reports 3 p.m. (Golden 1) King 255/257
10/18 Building Strong Credit 3 p.m. (Golden 1) Clark w/Steven
10/23 Creating a Budget 3 p.m. (Golden 1) King 225/229
10/24 Identity Theft 3 p.m. (US Bank) Clark 140F
10/25 Maintaining a Budget 3 p.m. (Golden 1) CVB
10/29 Loans (Student Loans) and How to Budget their Usage 10:30 a.m. (US Bank) King 225/229

November

11/05 Identity Theft and Social Networking noon (Golden 1) King 255/257
11/06 Establishing Credit for College Students 3 p.m. (Meriwest) Clark 140F
11/07 Understanding Credit Cards noon (Golden 1) Clark 100H
11/07 Loans and How to Budget Usage 3 p.m. (US Bank) King 225/229
11/08 Credit Myths and Repair 3 p.m. (Meriwest) A.S. House Fireside Room
11/12 Banking Basics 1:30 p.m. (UWSV) Clark 100H
11/14 Introduction to Credit/How to Read Credit Reports noon (Golden 1) CVB
11/14 Banking Basics 3 p.m. (US Bank) Clark 140F
11/15 Basics of Checking/Savings 10:30 a.m. (Wells Fargo Bank) Clark 100H
11/15 Credit/Budgeting 3 p.m. (Wells Fargo Bank) Clark 140F
11/19 Loans and How to Budget Usage 10:30 a.m. (US Bank) Clark 100H
11/19 Building Strong Credit noon (Golden 1) King 225/229
11/28 Loans and How to Budget Usage 3 p.m. (US Bank) King 225/229

December

12/03 Banking Basics 1 p.m. (UWSV) King 225/229

SJSU in the News: County Assessor Delivers Upbeat Economic Outlook

‘The Worst Is Behind Us,’ County Assessor Tells Neighborhood Leaders

Originally posted by NeighborWebSJ in October 2011.

With a caveat that public assessors are better at analyzing the past than predicting the future, Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone gave this financial assessment to neighborhood leaders gathered at the third annual Neighborhood Development Training Conference at San Jose State University:

“The worst is behind us, and there are reasons for some optimism.”

Stone was the keynote speaker for the third annual Neighborhood Development Training Conference, a collaboration of San José State University, Neighborhood Housing Services Silicon Valley, United Neighborhoods of Santa Clara County and NeighborWorks. More than 200 neighborhood leaders attended the October 8 event at San Jose State University’s Clark Hall.

The one-day Neighborhood Development Training conference provided workshops on topics ranging from safety and organizing to conserving energy and managing money.

Before the lunchtime keynote speech, the annual $1,000 BRICC award from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation was presented to two neighborhood groups. The Blackford Neighborhood Action Coalition in West San Jose won the award given to an established neighborhood, and the Erickson Neighborhood in Council District 9 won among emerging neighborhood groups. The Building Resourceful Inspirational Creative Community award was presented by Stephanie Anabo, the sister of the late Elizabeth Anabo for whom the award is named.

Yasmin Rios, president of the Edenvale/Great Oaks Neighborhood Action Coalition, also receive an award for organizing her neighborhood to fight crime, which was presented by San Jose Police Department Assistant Chief Rikki Goede.

Reminding us of the grim realities of the past 30 months, Stone listed a litany of economic lowlights – the stock market tanked, unemployment skyrocketed,
housing prices plummeted and home foreclosures reached record levels. Major industries and banks were being bailed out.

“What I have seen in the last 36 months is by far the worst I’ve experienced in 45 years since I left graduate school for Wall Street,” Stone said.

On the positive side, Stone noted that while unemployment remains at 12.2 percent in the state, unemployment in Silicon Valley dropped to 10.3 percent in the first quarter of the year, down from 12.1 percent in January 2010. It’s still, however, above the national rate of 9.2 percent.

Also, weekly wages are going up and 3,300 new non-farm jobs were created in the state’s 10 metro areas. The 2011-12 county property assessment roll, which closed on July 1, grew from $296 billion to $299 billion, a modest but hopeful increase, Stone said.

Turning to the housing market, the county assessor said he was pleased at the strength in apartment building, with vacancies down and rents going up, which drives developers to build multi-family projects. But in the single-family sector, overbuilding and faulty loans in an already weak economy plummeted home values by 50 percent in some areas.

As of January 1, 27 percent of homes and 49 percent of condos — a total of 122,000 properties — were assessed below their purchase price. While the number of foreclosures in the county is still high, the trend is slightly downward. In 2008, more then 6,200 homes were in foreclosure, compared to 4,240 last year.

The retail sector, however, will probably remain weak because of consumers’ high credit card debt, overbuilding of strip malls and shopping centers and the growth of online shopping.

Ending on a positive note, Stone said that for the first time in a while, Silicon Valley companies are offering IPOs, a sign that the area is moving toward recovery.

4 conference organizers with signage outside Clark Hall

Neighborhood Development Training Conference Fosters Leadership

4 conference organizers with signage outside Clark Hall

Donna Stewart, Grace Red, Ginny Yandow and Ken Kelly, volunteer board members United Neighborhoods of Santa Clara County (photo courtesy of Donna Stewart).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

More than 200 community members including SJSU students, faculty and staff attended the third annual Neighborhood Development Training Conference Oct. 8 at Clark Hall. Offered at no cost, the event aims to strengthen the voices and skills of neighborhood residents with workshops taught by practitioner-instructors who have experience in improving local communities. Sessions included “Using the Internet as a Community Organizing Tool,” “Community Policing for Neighborhood Safety,” and “Stabilizing Neighborhoods in Difficult Economic Times.” SJSU, community and elected leaders served as speakers. Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone also gave a brief address. A lunch-period resource fair featured some 20 community organizations, including Spartan Athletics, which graciously donated football tickets to attendees. Sponsors included the SJSU Center for Community Learning and Leadership, Neighborhood Housing Services Silicon Valley, and United Neighborhoods of Santa Clara County.

Neighborhood Development Training Conference

This third annual conference is an excellent example of SJSU as a metropolitan university collaborating in serving the community.

Date: October 8, 2011

Time: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Location: Clark Hall

Description:
Offered at no cost to more than 200 community members including SJSU students, faculty and staff, this event aims to strengthen the voices and skills of neighborhood residents with workshops taught by practitioner-instructors who have experience in improving local communities. Sessions include “Using the Internet as a Community Organizing Tool,” “Community Policing for Neighborhood Safety,” and “Stabilizing Neighborhoods in Difficult Economic Times.”

Speakers include SJSU, community and elected leaders. Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone will also give a brief address. A lunch-period resource fair will feature some 20 community organizations, including Spartan Athletics, which has graciously donated football tickets to attendees. Sponsors include the SJSU Center for Community Learning and Leadership, Neighborhood Housing Services Silicon Valley, and United Neighborhoods of Santa Clara County.

For more information, please contact Jaime Angulo at (408) 279-2600, extension 1290. Learn more and download a registration form.

— Submitted by Center for Community Learning and Leadership Associate Director Michael Fallon