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California State University Considers Budget Alternatives

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Governor's May Revision Avoids Direct Cuts to CSU

System outlines options dependent on Governor’s tax measure

Media Contacts: Claudia Keith or Mike Uhlenkamp, (562) 951-4800

(July 16, 2012) – With the state budget for 2012-13 now signed, the California State University Board of Trustees will discuss budget options for the system at its regularly scheduled board meeting tomorrow. The final budget relies on the successful passage of the Governor’s tax measure in November. University officials will lay out the difficult budget choices if voters don’t approve the measure and the CSU faces an additional $250 million mid-year “trigger” cut. Options include strategies to reduce payroll costs, a “triggered” mid-year tuition fee increase, enrollment reductions, and other ideas will all be part of the contingencies considered. View the CSU Budget Central website, the SJSU Budget Central website, or current SJSU tuition and campus fees.

“These are all difficult challenges and choices that the CSU must consider to address our severe budget situation,” said Robert Turnage, assistant vice chancellor for budget.

Facing a nearly $16 billion deficit, the state budget adopted by the legislature and the Governor keeps the CSU’s budget essentially flat. However, should the Governor’s tax measure fail, the CSU will face an additional $250 million mid-year “trigger” cut. In that event, the system will have lost almost $1.2 billion or 39% of its state support since 2007-08.

Over the past several months, the CSU has been meeting and holding consultative discussions with its stakeholders to gather input and feedback on budget options. While the board will consider strategies to address the budget problem at its July meeting, it isn’t expected to make final decisions on a contingency budget plan until it meets in September.

Ongoing Budget Deficit
As a result of drastic state budget cuts and increases in mandatory costs such as employee health care premiums, the CSU has a funding gap of approximately $510 million. This is despite increases in tuition fee revenue of $593 million that have only partially filled the hole created by more than $1 billion in state funding reductions.

In addition, the budget just approved has an option for a delayed tuition buy out that appropriates $125 million in next year’s budget, but only if the Governor’s tax measure passes and if the CSU board rolls back the tuition increase already in effect for fall 2012. The CSU had expected to receive $132 million of net revenue from the tuition increase for this fiscal year, and the 23 campuses have already built their budgets and planned course schedules based on this revenue. The system is working to identify a solution to replace the lost revenue for the current fiscal year.

Although the campuses and the Chancellor’s Office have implemented numerous cost reduction actions – including furloughs and a workforce reduction of more than 3,000 employees – a large portion of the funding gap has been covered by one-time resources and deferrals.

“We are at the point where the use of one-time funds to address ongoing budget cuts is not sustainable,” said CSU Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer Benjamin Quillian. “It is not possible to continue to patch over budget holes. We need to take actions that reduce our costs going forward. That is the only way we will be able to serve students with the classes and support services that they need.”

Staff will present two alternative strategies to address a potential $250 million mid-year “trigger” cut with both options sharing components including reducing salaries or increasing employees’ share of benefit costs; reducing faculty assigned time and sabbaticals; charging for excess units, and the use of continuing education funds and other one-time resources. One option preserves access by not cutting enrollment while the other relies on larger payroll reductions by maintaining tuition fee levels.

“Trigger on trigger”
Under this option, the board would authorize at its September meeting a contingency mid-year tuition fee increase of $150 per semester or about 5% that would be “triggered” if the CSU faces a $250 million cut if the tax initiative fails. There would be no incremental set aside for financial aid since that would require a larger increase to generate the same net revenue, and would result in a larger burden for students without significant financial aid. The CSU already provides almost $700 million in tuition subsidies for students with the greatest financial need. There would also be no further enrollment reductions under this approach.

Employee pay/benefit reductions
Since 85% of CSU’s budget is personnel related, reductions in employee pay or increases in the amount employees pay for benefits will need to be considered. Options include systemwide reductions in personnel costs that could be achieved through negotiated reductions in employee salaries, or alternatively, through greater cost-sharing of health benefit premiums.

Reduce enrollment/reduce faculty and staff positions
If the CSU’s budget is cut an additional $250 million and no new tuition fee increase is implemented, the CSU would need to reduce 2013-14 enrollment by 6,000 students, and eliminate the associated 750 faculty/staff positions.

Faculty Assigned Time and Sabbaticals
Campuses have reduced assigned time, but further prioritization of non-teaching activities could result in savings of up to $25 million.

Third Level Pricing Structure
All of the new pricing strategies would provide more room for incoming students, help students progress to degree, and ensure that diminishing state resources are used to effectively serve as many students as possible.

Specifics include:

  • Charging for the full cost of any units over 16 per semester
  • Charging a “course repeat” fee for any single class taken by a student more than once
  • Implementing a graduation incentive fee for “super seniors” who have already taken five years worth of academic credit funded by the state
  • Increase tuition supplement for nonresident students by $1,000

One Time Transfer of Continuing Education Reserves
Both approaches include a transfer of approximately $75 million from CSU’s Continuing Education Revenue Fund. This would provide significant relief to the “state side” of the university for 2012-13 but would be one-time and restricted to that fiscal year.

The board will also take action on a resolution to endorse the Governor’s tax measure.

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 427,000 students and 44,000 faculty and staff. The CSU awards about 99,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million. The CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces. The mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever changing needs of the people of California. With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California. Connect with and learn more about the CSU at CSU Social Media. Show how the CSU matters to you and take action.

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CSU Faces Unprecedented Demand, Limited Space

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San Jose State received received 45,000 applications for fall 2012, a four percent increase over last year.

Applications and admits continue to rise despite efforts to control enrollment

(May 21, 2012) – The California State University today released preliminary systemwide data for the upcoming fall term indicating all-time highs in applications, and a year-over-year increase in the number of students admitted. San Jose State received 45,000 applications for fall 2012, a four percent increase over last year. SJSU admitted over 26,000 applicants, including over 24,000 undergraduates. The CSU expects to enroll approximately 25 percent of the resident first-time freshmen admitted and roughly 50 percent of the resident transfer students admitted. The CSU estimates that 95 percent of the enrolling freshman class and 94 percent of enrolling undergraduate transfer students will be California residents. “The CSU is caught between a huge demand to attend our universities and a state that simply is not providing adequate funding for these students,” said Eric Forbes, CSU assistant vice chancellor, student academic support.  “We are facing a tipping point in terms of the promise of access that is at the heart of the CSU mission.” Read more.

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Governor's May Revision Avoids Direct Cuts to CSU

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If the governor's tax measure is defeated, CSU's state funding would fall to $1.8 billion, the lowest amount of state funding the university has received in 17 years.

Governor Brown’s May Revision of the 2012-13 state budget proposes a $250 million trigger cut for the California State University if his tax measure is rejected by voters this November.  With voter approval of the tax measure, the CSU would receive an essentially flat budget with $2.06 billion in state funding. “We very much appreciate the governor’s hard work to avoid further direct cuts to higher education despite the steep growth in the size of the state deficit.  Nevertheless, all Californians should be concerned about the serious long-term damage to student access to the California State University that is posed by the $250 million trigger cut,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed.  “Combined with last year’s $750 million cut, no easy options remain.  It will be extremely difficult to avoid impacts to program quality at our 23 campuses or impacts to access for students and the ability to serve them, with long-term consequences for workforce development and job growth in the state.  The November election will be critical to preventing this.”

Read more on the CSU Budget Central website.

Read more on tuition.

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Governor’s May Revision Avoids Direct Cuts to CSU

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If the governor's tax measure is defeated, CSU's state funding would fall to $1.8 billion, the lowest amount of state funding the university has received in 17 years.

Governor Brown’s May Revision of the 2012-13 state budget proposes a $250 million trigger cut for the California State University if his tax measure is rejected by voters this November.  With voter approval of the tax measure, the CSU would receive an essentially flat budget with $2.06 billion in state funding. “We very much appreciate the governor’s hard work to avoid further direct cuts to higher education despite the steep growth in the size of the state deficit.  Nevertheless, all Californians should be concerned about the serious long-term damage to student access to the California State University that is posed by the $250 million trigger cut,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed.  “Combined with last year’s $750 million cut, no easy options remain.  It will be extremely difficult to avoid impacts to program quality at our 23 campuses or impacts to access for students and the ability to serve them, with long-term consequences for workforce development and job growth in the state.  The November election will be critical to preventing this.”

Read more on the CSU Budget Central website.

Read more on tuition.

Provost Ellen Junn speaking with Power Point in the background

SJSU Welcomes 26,800 Students to Spring Term 2012

Provost Ellen Junn speaking with Power Point in the background

Ellen Junn at her first forum as SJSU's chief academic officer (Robert Bain photo).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

Sunny skies greeted nearly 26,800 students beginning spring term 2012 Jan. 25 at San Jose State.

Around 800 transfers arrived on campus, including at least one San Francisco 49er. Donte Whitner lit up Twitter with tons of questions on everything from barbecue to student services.

New Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn became perhaps the first SJSU administrator ever to incorporate live audience polling via cell phone into a campuswide forum on the budget and strategic plan.

President Mo Qayoumi began the term with a welcome back message vowing to move forward on Vision 2012. “I am well aware that ‘strategic plans’ can become empty words. Let me assure you that this is not our path,” he said.

“Acceleration: The Campaign for San Jose State University” will continue to make progress toward its $200 million goal, while Governor Brown proposed a flat budget for the CSU in 2012-2013. He’ll update the numbers in May.

The University Police Department introduced an evening shuttle, providing safe transit for campus community members traveling between SJSU and nearby residences, workplaces, classrooms or public transit.

Students of course continue to work away on a wide range of academic and pre-professional endeavors. One example is a team of aspiring engineers developing a futuristic spherical drive system.

Athletics Director Tom Bowen will provide all faculty and staff two free tickets to a Spartan Basketball doubleheader Feb. 4, when rally towels will be given away to the first 500 people in attendance.

Later this semester, on Feb. 25, MSNBC political analyst Rachel Maddow will accept the John Steinbeck Award, “In the Souls of the People,” following in the footsteps of Sean Penn, Michael Moore and many others.

Spring term is for milestones. The Honors Convocation will celebrate its 50th anniversary April 20, recognizing students with top GPAs. The same day, an Investiture Ceremony is planned for President Qayoumi.

At Commencement May 26, SJSU will send more than 8,000 students into the workforce or on to graduate school. Go Spartans!

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CSU Adopts Policy Limiting Presidential Compensation

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Compensation paid by state general funds for newly-hired CSU presidents will be no more than 10 percent above the previous incumbent's base pay.

Contacts:
Claudia Keith
or Mike Uhlenkamp, CSU Media Relations, (562) 951-4800
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, (408) 656-6999

(January 25, 2012) – The California State University Board of Trustees today adopted a new policy limiting the amount of compensation paid by state general funds for newly-hired CSU presidents to no more than 10 percent above the previous incumbent’s base pay.  The new policy was adopted as part of the recommendations made by the board’s Special Committee on Presidential Selection and Compensation that has been reviewing the system’s selection process and executive compensation structure since last summer.

CSU Board Chair Herbert Carter said the new policy will provide presidential campus candidates, policymakers, the public and others with a reasonable expectation of salary levels for newly hired presidents.

“The new compensation limits and more relevant tiered list of comparator institutions will give stakeholders a good benchmark of where presidential compensation will be set as we move forward,” said Carter.  “Our continued goal is to recruit and compete for the best leadership possible, but also within articulated budget guidelines.”

SJSU President Mo Qayoumi earns a total of $353,200 annually. His base salary is $328,200. The SJSU Tower Foundation provides an additional $25,000. The same arrangement was provided to SJSU’s past two presidents.

Under the newly adopted compensation policy, presidential compensation will be guided with reference to the mean of the appropriate tier of comparison institutions, together with an individual candidates’ reputation for national policy leadership, length and depth of executive experience, and consistent with other uses of resources within the annual budget.

The newly added policy language states that “….when a presidential vacancy occurs, the initial base salary, paid with public funds to the successor president, shall not exceed ten percent of the previous incumbent’s pay.”

In the past, CSU presidential compensation was determined with reference to the compensation of presidents at 20 institutions throughout the country identified by the California Postsecondary Education Commission as appropriate comparators.  The CPEC comparator list was used for 20 years and included public and private institutions such as USC, Tufts and Rutgers.  The CPEC comparators included presidents with salaries as high as $2 million, and created a salary market “gap” with CSU presidents of more than 40 percent.  Under the new comparators, the salary gap for CSU presidential compensation has been reduced.

Enrollment and budget were the primary drivers for the development of the new comparison list that groups campuses by tiers against institutions that have similar missions and student profiles.  Other criteria used include the number of Pell students and the 6-year graduation rate.  The list will be updated annually.

Although Qayoumi is the top paid president of a CSU campus with high enrollment and a mid-range research budget, his total salary remains well below the benchmark for comparable institutions nationwide.

CSU is currently in the process of five presidential searches for leaders at campuses including Fullerton, Northridge, San Bernardino, San Francisco and the Maritime Academy.  The adopted compensation policy will be implemented as the board makes presidential selections and determines the salary levels of newly hired presidents.

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About California State University
The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 427,000 students and 44,000 faculty and staff. The CSU awards about 99,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million. The CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces. The mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever changing needs of the people of California. With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California.

Connect with and learn more about the CSU at CSU Social Media.

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Governor Proposes Flat Budget for California State University

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The proposed $2 billion in state support for the CSU is the lowest in 15 years, and reflects the continuation of a $750 million or 27 percent reduction in funding made in 2011-2012.

Series of trigger cuts to go into effect if tax measures defeated

Media Contacts: Claudia Keith or Mike Uhlenkamp, (562) 951-4800

(January 5, 2012) – Governor Brown today released his 2012-2013 state budget proposal that calls for no change from this year’s level of state support of the California State University, provided that his tax initiative slated for the November ballot is passed by voters. The proposed $2 billion in state support for the CSU is the lowest in 15 years, and reflects the continuation of a $750 million or 27 percent reduction in funding made in 2011-2012.

Read more on the CSU Budget Central website.
Read more on tuition.

In addition, the proposed budget relies on the passage of the Governor’s tax measure that would raise income taxes on high-income earners and increase the state sales tax, generating approximately $7 billion a year in additional revenue. If the measure is not approved by voters, the Governor’s budget proposal includes a series of trigger cuts that would go into effect, including an additional $200 million cut to the CSU, which represents almost 27,000 enrolled students. That would bring state support to $1.8 billion, which would be the lowest level of state funding since 1996-97, even though CSU enrolls 95,000 more students today.

“Our campuses have done everything they can just to get through this fiscal year with a $750 million budget cut,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed. “We have only survived by implementing numerous cost cutting measures, being extremely prudent with resources, and spending down one-time reserves. However, we are just about out of options, and if the state does not begin to reinvest in the CSU, we will need to take more drastic measures including cutting enrollment and programs, raising tuition and reducing personnel.”

The $2 billion in state funding allocated to the CSU for the 2012-2013 budget is the lowest level of state support the system has received since 1997-1998, but the university currently serves an additional 90,000 students compared to that year.

For the past three years, CSU has instituted a number of cost saving measures including decreased enrollment, employee layoffs and furloughs, deferred maintenance, travel restrictions, better use of information technology and other efforts. To get through the remaining months of this fiscal year, campuses will need to take short-term measures such as drawing on one-time reserves, delaying equipment purchases and facility maintenance work. However, starting with the next fiscal year, extremely difficult longer-term tradeoffs will have to be considered, including the possibility of additional cuts to academic programs or further increases in tuition.

The budget proposal for 2012-2013 does not restore the $100 million trigger cut, making the $750 million reduction a permanent reduction to the base of state funding for the CSU. In two of the last four fiscal years, state support to the CSU has been dramatically reduced, forcing the CSU board to approve sizable tuition fee increases. However, increases in revenue from tuition hikes – after setting aside one-third for financial aid – have not kept pace with state funding cuts. For the current academic year, tuition increases raised approximately $300 million, but CSU’s budget was cut by $750 million.

“We cannot continue down this budget path and expect that we can offer the same number of courses to the same number of students and maintain quality,” added Reed. “California needs to make public universities a priority again. It is unrealistic to think the state will be able to grow its economy without an educated workforce.”

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About California State University

The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 412,000 students and 43,000 faculty and staff. The CSU awards about 90,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million. Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces. The mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever changing needs of the people of California. With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California. Connect with and learn more about the CSU at CSU Social Media.

San Francisco Chronicle: Legislation Governing CSU Presidential Compensation Proposed

Senator’s bill would cap CSU presidents’ salaries

Originally published in the San Francisco Chronicle Jan. 5, 2012.

By Nanette Asimov, Chronicle Staff Writer

The salaries of California State University campus presidents would be capped, and discussions about their pay would be held in public, under a bill being proposed by a state senator frustrated that CSU has been raising executive pay as well as tuition.

The proposal comes months after CSU trustees hired a campus president in San Diego for $400,000 a year – $100,000 more than his predecessor – and at the same meeting that they approved a 12 percent tuition increase.

“It is not reasonable to give $100,000 raises to executive positions, especially when simultaneously raising tuition,” said state Sen. Ted Lieu, D-Torrance (Los Angeles County), author of SB755.

Under the bill, no new campus president could be paid more than 150 percent of whatever the chief justice of the California Supreme Court makes. The current chief justice, Tani Gorre Cantil-Sakauye, earns $228,856. That means future CSU campus presidents could make up to $343,269.

Three campus presidents are now paid more than the proposed limit of $343,269, including San Jose State University President Mo Qayoumi, whose salary is $353,200.

The bill also would prohibit presidential pay raises or bonuses if a tuition increase is pending or was imposed in the two previous years. For CSU, that would have meant no raises at all during the past decade because tuition rose every year.

A third provision would prevent discussions of presidential salaries from being conducted in private, a feature prompted by a judge’s ruling in October that CSU trustees acted within the law when they publicly announced a president’s new salary but discussed the details in private. Faculty members had sued, saying the trustees had violated state open meeting laws by deciding in private to pay Jeffrey Armstrong, the new president of California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, more than the maximum published amount for the position.

Finally, when hiring a campus president, the trustees would have to first consider CSU employees, then look among California residents before considering applicants from out of state.

Lieu’s bill comes as CSU has lost $750 million in state funding this fiscal year. The system also needs to hire six campus presidents.

In all, there are 23 campus presidents. Three are retiring, including Robert Corrigan of San Francisco State University, as well as presidents of the San Bernardino and Maritime campuses. Another three campuses – East Bay, Fullerton and Northridge – have interim presidents.

Lieu is presenting his bill as a common-sense approach in tough economic times.

But CSU officials see it as an unwarranted intrusion on their authority.

“Setting the pay of the presidents is the responsibility of the Board of Trustees in consultation with (Chancellor Charles Reed), and that is where the fiduciary responsibility should remain,” said Claudia Keith, a spokeswoman for CSU.

CSU officials also want the flexibility to hire whomever they want to lead their campuses.

“We need to be able to recruit nationally to get the type of leaders campuses need and want for our institutions,” Keith said.

Even so, she said, nine of the 23 campus presidents were promoted from within the university.

As to the requirement that salary discussions take place in public, Keith said the trustees never approve salaries or raise tuition without an open session of the board.

Keith added that no CSU president has received a raise since 2007, “and we don’t have a bonus system.”

The incident that prompted Lieu to introduce SB755, he said, was the announcement in July that Elliot Hirshman, incoming president of CSU San Diego, would be paid $400,000 a year when his predecessor made $299,435.

The decision, announced the same day that the trustees raised student tuition, prompted a scathing letter from Gov. Jerry Brown.

“The assumption is that you cannot find a qualified man or woman to lead the university unless paid twice that of the chief justice of the United States,” Brown wrote. “I reject this notion.”

E-mail Nanette Asimov at nasimov@sfchronicle.com.

This article appeared on page C – 2 of the San Francisco Chronicle

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State Cuts Additional $100 Million from CSU Budget

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The CSU had previously announced that it will not raise tuition mid-year, even with the additional $100 million cut.

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris
, SJSU Media Relations, 408-656-6999

Governor Jerry Brown announced today that California will impose $980 million in mid-year trigger cuts, including a $100 million cut to the California State University. SJSU’s estimated share of this reduction will be $6.5 million, which will be met with one-time reserves. The CSU had previously announced that it will not raise tuition mid-year. To get through the remaining months of this fiscal year, campuses will need to take short-term measures. However, starting with the next fiscal year, extremely difficult longer-term tradeoffs will have to be considered, including the possibility of additional cuts to academic programs or further increases in tuition. The $100 million trigger cut for the CSU comes on top of a $650 million reduction already in place, as a result of lower-than-projected state revenues. The additional cut reduces CSU funding to $2 billion and represents a 27 percent year-to-year reduction in state support. For the current fiscal year 2011-2012, tuition increases raised approximately $300 million, but CSU’s budget has now been cut by $750 million.

Read a California State University news release.

SJSU in the News: President Qayoumi Discusses Protests with Metro Silicon Valley Editor

Man in the Middle

San Jose State’s President Mohammad Qayoumi finds himself in a tough spot as he deals with students, faculty mad about cuts.

Originally published by SanJose.com Nov. 30, 2011

By Josh Koehn

As the sun sets outside the gothic Tower Hall on San Jose State University’s campus, Mohammad Qayoumi sits at a board table in his office, looking every bit the politician with his crisp shirt and tie, gray hair parted neatly to the right.

He doesn’t spend much time talking about himself, even when the questions pertain to the uncomfortable political role Qayoumi is currently being forced to play. The president of SJSU—who was born in Afghanistan and previously presided over Cal-State East Bay—is being pulled in two different directions.

On one side, tugging for his advocacy, are students and faculty staging protests: the former incensed about increased tuition fees, the latter coordinating strikes over compensation complaints. And on the other side are Qayoumi’s superiors: Chancellor Charles Reed and the board of trustees.

Qayoumi’s job is to mediate between the various interests and lead the university at the same time, pretty much an impossible assignment. So, when he is asked about the difficulty of being stuck in the middle, it’s not surprising that his answer is political.

“I think the unfortunate thing is we have a bigger societal issue,” Qayoumi says. “There is such a hyper-level of partisanship that has really impeded any level of compromise for both sides of the political spectrum working together. One side of our political arena has been shackled with no-tax pledges, and then on the other side people are trying to protect a lot of social programs. When our revenue streams and our expense streams do not match, that has created the quagmire that a lot of us in California are facing.”

When Gov. Jerry Brown reviewed his state budget plan at the beginning of this year, many knew public education would be one of the first things on the chopping block. The Cal-State system alone took $650 million in cuts, forcing students to see tuition increases for the sixth straight year. That is almost guaranteed to grow to seven, as an additional $100 million in cuts are expected due to revenue shortfalls based on unmet projections.

“There has always been an easy way out for a lot of our public officials,” Qayoumi says. “They can cut us since there is a vehicle of being able to increase fees.”

Students protested the CSU board of trustees’ meeting on Nov. 16, when a 9 percent increase in tuition fees was approved. Several students were arrested for trying to storm the meeting, which was eventually held behind closed doors. Objections were raised by students, faculty, the media and Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, who took part in the 9-6 vote to increase fees. Reed, however, said there was no good reason to revisit the vote.

As a result, students at SJSU walked out in protest the same day, with more than a couple hundred people carrying signs, banging drums and chanting before stopping at the iconic Tommie Smith and John Carlos statue on campus.

Qayoumi had no power to influence the board of trustees’ vote nor the subsequent protests, but students and faculty are keeping a close eye on how he responds. With no immediate solutions at hand to curb costs substantially or to create additional revenue outside of tuition increases, matters can only get worse.

“What remains to be seen is what kind of president he is and what policies he favors and enacts,” says Johnathan Karpf, an anthropology lecturer at SJSU. “He’s been open to hearing the frustrations that faculty, students and staff have. But all the university presidents serve at the pleasure of the chancellor, so as a consequence of that very few are willing to say anything that contravenes with what the chancellor is saying. My feeling is [Qayoumi] will be touting whatever line the chancellor wants him to tout. And that’s the nature of the beast.”

Double Vision

When Karpf lists off the achievements and eventual decline of societies such as the Aztecs, Mayans or Incas, he sees twice as many students as the two dozen or so he had sitting in his classrooms a generation ago.

“In the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, my average class size was 25 students,” Karpf says. “In those same classes, my class size has gone up to 50 to 60.”

In Karpf’s opinion, he isn’t just teaching about technically advanced societies that once flourished through education only to become decimated—he’s living in one. Budget cuts have made increased class sizes and stretched-thin teachers an all-too common tale in California’s educational system. As a result, lecturers such as Karpf, who hold no tenure and can easily lose their jobs, are voicing dissent at their own peril.

“When you’re talking about state funding cuts, that is real,” says Karpf, who sits on the California Faculty Association’s board of directors. “That argument is legitimate. No faculty member, certainly not me, will dispute that.”

But Karpf and others will debate where the board of trustees directs its dollars.

“The thing is people say the budget is bad and California doesn’t have the money, but they do have the money,” says Gloria Collins, a 31-year English lecturer at SJSU and secretary on the CFA board. “It gets misappropriated, in my opinion.” That theory will be tested, in part, when auxiliary organizations and foundations for California’s community colleges, the University of California system and CSU schools open their books for public inspection for the first time on Jan. 1.

Sponsored by state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco), Senate Bill 8 clears those organizations and foundations’ records for public records requests while protecting the names of donors. It’s from these university foundations and auxiliaries where not all but a portion of salaries of presidents and administrators are paid. How much is not always known but is a topic of hot debate amongst faculty.

“The short answer is we don’t really know how much money is there, but we’re looking forward to the opportunity of finding out,” Karpf says. “I can’t cite empirical basis for this, but I have the feeling the foundations—because they have not been transparent—allow the chancellor to move funds from the general fund into the foundations.”

Much was made of the CSU trustees’ decision in July to raise the salary of new San Diego State President Elliot Hirshman to $400,000, which was an increase of more than $100,000 over that of his predecessor, Stephen Weber. But Weber went a substantial time without a raise, Qayoumi says, adding that the CFA’s use of limited information regarding negotiations as well as Hirschman’s salary during their protests was misleading.

“When you’re trying to make the best case of your own situation, you want to use data very judiciously and also promote your case, while not really giving all of the context of it,” he says.

While that could be seen as a company line, Qayoumi agrees with the legislation to open the foundations and auxiliary organizations’ books: “I always believe what they say: ‘Light is the best disinfectant.’ For accountability, transparency is the first step.”

Nailing down exactly where Qayoumi stands in the continuing fight between faculty and students against the chancellor and his board will also soon be revealed. But for now, it seems he is content to side with the latter.

“I think they are trying to do the right thing,” Qayoumi says, “but I think part of it is that many of the specialized interests are not interested in hearing it.”

SJSU in the News: Proposed Policy Could Affect San Jose State Presidential Compensation

More pay issues at Calif. state universities

Originally published by the San Francisco Chronicle Dec. 1, 2011.

By Nanette Asimov, Chronicle Staff Writer

Fearing violence, California State University trustees will cancel next week’s vote on salaries for campus presidents, they said Wednesday – the same day a state senator criticized the University of California regents for handing out state-funded raises of up to 22 percent to some of UC’s best-paid executives.

“Time and time again, rather than protecting the needs of students and California families, the regents and trustees line the pockets of their top executives,” Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, said Wednesday after learning that the pay raises were among the actions taken by the regents in a Monday teleconference protested by students on campuses around the state.

Yee’s assessment echoed that of thousands of student protesters who have joined the Occupy movement in recent weeks and likened university leaders to Wall Street fat cats for paying themselves more money even as they consistently raise tuition.

“While these public administrators are living high on the hog, many Californians are struggling,” Yee said.

On Monday, the UC regents gave a 9.9 percent raise to each of three vice chancellors. Another vice chancellor, Joseph Castro of UCSF, received a 7.5 percent increase, raising his pay to $252,625 a year.

The regents also gave raises to the head attorneys at six campuses, including 8.9 percent to Marcia Canning of UCSF and 21.19 percent to Steven Drown of UC Davis, increasing their base pay to $255,000 a year. Carole Rossi of UC Santa Cruz received a 13.9 percent increase, raising her annual pay to $215,000.

The regents also used nonstate funds to give raises of nearly 14 percent and 23 percent to two executives at UC Davis and UC Santa Cruz.

Raises are “a tough argument to make in this environment,” acknowledged UC spokeswoman Lynn Tierney. “At the same time, it’s critical to ensure that we have the best possible people.”

Meanwhile, the CSU trustees had scheduled a special meeting in Long Beach on Monday, not to award raises but to vote on a new policy for determining how much to pay CSU’s 23 campus presidents.

They canceled it because “we couldn’t guarantee the safety of people coming to the meeting,” said CSU spokeswoman Claudia Keith. At their last meeting on Nov. 16, when the trustees raised tuition by 9 percent, protesters clashed with police at CSU headquarters in Long Beach, breaking the building’s glass door and sending one officer to the hospital.

CSU makes presidential salary decisions by looking at what other universities are paying, and has used the same 10 public and five private universities as a comparison group since 1993.

But the economy and the universities have changed in that time, and the trustees had been expected to adopt a new comparison system on Monday. The proposal groups CSU campuses into categories, comparing each with different universities based on the characteristics of those campuses.

San Diego State, for example, is the only campus with a high level of research, so it would be compared with other research-focused institutions.

San Francisco State and San Jose State are among six CSU campuses with a mid-range level of research as well as high enrollment.

Other campuses are smaller, and would be compared against schools of similar sizes.

Another issue the trustees were to take up on Monday was raising private money for presidential salaries if state lawmakers approve a cap on executive pay in bad budget years. Yee introduced such a bill in 2009, which was vetoed by then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Among the ideas proposed are a 1 percent surcharge on such services as housing and parking, creating a fund where donors could chip in, and offering a CSU credit card for alumni in which a percentage of charges would go to presidential salaries.

Asked why these methods would be considered for executive pay but not for shoring up CSU’s cash-strapped academic program, Keith said it was less expensive to bolster the presidents than the entire faculty.

“They’re a much smaller group,” Keith said of the presidents. “There are only 23 of them, compared with 20,000 faculty members.”

The trustees expect to take up the presidential pay issues at their next scheduled meeting, on Jan. 24 and 25.

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CSU Asks State To Restore $333 Million in 2012-2013 Budget

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Increases in revenue from tuition hikes – after setting aside one-third for financial aid – have not kept pace with state funding cuts.

Contacts:
Claudia Keith
or Erik Fallis , (562) 951-4800

(Nov. 16, 2011) — The California State University Board of Trustees today unanimously approved its 2012-2013 budget, which requests that the governor and legislature provide an additional $333 million in state funding for the upcoming fiscal year. The board also approved an increase in tuition of $498 a year that will go into effect for fall 2012. The vote was 9 to 6*.

(This will bring the annual total tuition and fees for a full-time SJSU undergraduate to approximately $7,395 beginning in fall 2012.)

“The additional revenue requested in this budget is critical to addressing the deep and painful cuts the CSU has had to absorb, and to ensure that students have access to needed courses and support services,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed.

“While there is still so much uncertainty in the state’s fiscal condition, we wanted to provide students and parents with as much notice as possible that tuition will go up in the fall.  That said, we must all work with state leaders to restore the funding needed to maintain access and quality for CSU students.”

CSU is also actively reviewing options to more effectively package financial aid with the goal of providing more grant aid to a broader number of students.

“We recognize that increased tuition impacts many of our students in varying degrees, so we will be looking at financial aid options for students who have not to this point been eligible for full financial aid,” said Reed.

Under CSU’s current financial aid, students from households making $70,000 or less on average pay no tuition.  Since 2007, annual financial aid to CSU students has increased nearly $800 million, with grants, scholarships and waivers making up $475 million of this total.

In two of the last four fiscal years, state funding to the CSU has been dramatically reduced, forcing the board to approve sizable tuition fee increases.  However, increases in revenue from tuition hikes – after setting aside one-third for financial aid – have not kept pace with state funding cuts.  For the current fiscal year 2011-2012, tuition increases raised approximately $300 million, but CSU’s budget was cut by $650 million, with another $100 million trigger cut looming.  This would reduce CSU state funding to $2 billion or a year-over-year reduction of 27 percent.

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CSU Outlines Next Year’s Budget Request

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The CSU will request revenue increases for enrollment growth.

Despite the state’s fiscal condition, the CSU has legitimate funding needs critical to its mission and will seek an approximate 8.25 percent increase in its 2012-13 budget.

CSU Assistant Vice Chancellor for Budget Robert Turnage outlined next year’s preliminary budget request to the CSU’s Board of Trustees this week. The CSU has identified $315 million in needed revenue increases to cover a 5 percent growth in enrollment ($100 million); mandatory costs such as health/dental benefits for employees and energy among others ($50 million); 3 percent compensation increase ($95 million); graduation initiative and other student success programs ($40 million); urgent maintenance needs ($15 million); and an information technology infrastructure upgrade/renewal ($15 million).

The budget framework assumes that any additional “trigger cuts” in the current fiscal year will be one-time and not affect the ongoing base of state support the CSU receives. The CSU faces an additional mid-year cut of up to $100 million–on top of an already enacted cut of $650 million–if state revenue forecasts are not met. This would reduce the CSU’s state funding to $2 billion or a year-over-year reduction of 27 percent in state support. An updated and detailed budget recommendation will be presented to the board for action in November. More information.

For more on a decrease in student alcohol-related misconduct, students honored for perseverance and achievement, and the CSU’s 50th anniversary, view the California State University Employee Update for Sept. 22.

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Following $650 Million Budget Cut, CSU Trustees Approve Additional Tuition Increase

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"We will focus on serving our current students by offering as many classes and course sections as possible," Chancellor Reed said.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

SJSU basic registration fees for full-time undergrads will rise to $3,414 from $3,120 for fall 2011, the result of a tuition bump California State University trustees approved today.

Fall 2011 basic registration fees include $2,736 in tuition used for instruction and $280 in campus-based fees for services such as the Student Union and Student Health Center. Read more on the SJSU busar’s website.

One-third of the revenue from the tuition increase will be allocated for financial aid, and an estimated 170,000 needy students–almost half of all CSU undergraduates–will be fully covered for the tuition increase thanks to this provision and other grants and fee waivers.

In addition, many students and families not fully covered by financial aid will benefit from federal tax credits available for family incomes of up to $180,000.

“The enormous reduction to our state funding has left us with no other choice if we are to maintain quality and access to the CSU,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed. The CSU depends on just two major revenue streams, tuition and state funding.

Funding from the tuition increase will be prioritized on the classroom so that campuses can continue to offer needed courses and sections. Conservative planning has left SJSU in good shape to weather the latest round of cuts without reducing services to students.

Read a CSU news release.

SJSU in the News: Proposed Tuition Increase Leaves Students Scrambling for Jobs, Loans, Paid Internships

CSU, UC students brace for another round of tuition hikes

Originally published in the San Jose Mercury News July 10, 2011

By Lisa M. Krieger and Ellen Huet

Wendy Yang is working as hard as she can to save enough money to someday attend California State University.

But the rise in tuition is outpacing her paycheck.

On Tuesday, the CSU’s Board of Trustees votes on a 12 percent hike for a semester that starts in less than three months. That’s $1,272 more than it cost two years ago, when Wang enrolled in community college in Cupertino, landed a job in Milpitas — and set her sights on CSU-Pomona.

With a constantly moving target, “my friends and I are worried,” Yang said. “I’m trying to save money, and I love my job. But it seems like every couple of months, fees keep going up.”

University of California students are facing an increase as well — their ninth in eight years — if the Board of Regents approves a 9.6 percent hike at Thursday’s meeting.

The schools say the hikes are necessary to help offset the $150 million in additional budget cuts approved for each system when Gov. Jerry Brown signed the new state budget last month. In turn, the schools say they will boost financial aid to help. In addition to tuition hikes, both systems will cut operational costs, on top of previous cuts.

UC is even taking more desperate measures, such as increasing the payout from endowments and drawing down from an employee/retiree healthcare reserve.

Students and their families say that the average business couldn’t sustain such sudden, unpredictable and significant cost increases — and similarly, it busts their well-planned household budgets. “We weren’t prepared for such relentless fee increases,” said Morgan Hill’s Eric Acedo, 20, an environmental studies major at San Jose State. He already works one part-time job, as an office assistant — but wants a second one.

“I work as many hours as possible, but I’m looking for another. Everybody I know is looking for a job,” he said. “I should be studying full-time.”

University educators and analysts say the year-to-year state budget cuts make it equally tough for them to plan for their future.

“Schools are doing lots of things to get through this emergency. But it is very hard to plan your fiscal future when things are changing,” said researcher John Douglass of UC Berkeley’s Center for the Study of Higher Education. As state support keeps receding, he said, “You’re always waiting for another shoe to drop.”

Last-minute fee hikes and emergency cost-cutting “are all just reactive,” said William G. Tierney, director of the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis at the University of Southern California. “We haven’t heard a single thing from the governor about his vision for higher education — what he wants it to be.”

California is not alone in this mess: State support of higher education has sunk to the lowest level recorded in more than 30 years, according to a recent report by the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association, which tracks and reports these trends in annual financial reports.

Florida’s state schools are hiking tuition 15 percent — for the third year in a row. The University of Washington is considering a 20 percent boost in next fall’s tuition. Nevada’s Board of Regents voted earlier this month to raise tuition 13 percent at the state’s public colleges. At the University of Arizona, incoming freshmen are paying double what this spring’s graduating seniors paid — $10,035 a year, up from $5,037 four years ago.

More than two dozen governors are seeking slashed college funding, a possible $5 billion in cuts nationwide, according to the National Association of State Budget Officers.

“But what’s unique in California is the magnitude of the crisis — the size of the budget deficit, combined with a growing population,” Douglass said. “This puts it in a league of its own.”

“We used to be leaders,” said William G. Tierney, director of the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis at the University of Southern California. “It’s a tragedy.”

Tierney fears the growing debt on students who can least afford it. In 2009, Tierney remembers a UCLA student with no parental support needed to take out $3,567 in loans for a year of school; next fall, he has a student who will borrow $9,200.

Increasing fees mean that students may need to make tough choices about internships, which are often unpaid, said SJSU’s career center director Cheryl Allmen-Vinnedge.

“Many students would love to be able to accept an internship but perhaps it’s not as well-paying — so they’re forced to make choices between getting experience and putting food on the table,” she said. And if they’re sharing a house with roommates, to save money, “they have to think twice when they’re offered an internship in Washington D.C.”

“Many of ours students have several part-time jobs,” she added.

To help, Daniel Newell of SJSU’s Career Center has assembled a report compiling “job opportunities to meet rising student debt. With the downturn economy the past few years, rising tuition and debt, the college wanted to react to this,” he said.

Student groups are lobbying for a bill to make CSU and UC give students at least six months notice before raising tuition. But schools warn the bill could hurt students more than it would help, because campuses would need to reduce enrollment and close classes to cover revenue shortfalls.

“Tuition is the biggest lever you have” to quickly generate new revenue, when the state suddenly cuts support, Douglass said.

“We have been suffering a million small cuts,” he said, “but now we’re getting bludgeoned.”

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2011-12 State Budget Reduces Funding to CSU by at Least $650 Million

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State support has dropped to 1998-99 levels although the CSU system is serving an additional 90,000 students.

System will face an additional cut of $100 million if state revenue forecasts are not met

Media Contacts:
Mike Uhlenkamp or Erik Fallis, CSU Public Affairs, (562) 951-4800

View CSU Budget Central.

(June 30, 2011) – The 2011-12 budget will reduce state funding to the California State University by at least $650 million and proposes an additional mid-year cut of $100 million if state revenue forecasts are not met. A $650 million cut reduces General Fund support for the university to $2.1 billion and will represent a 23 percent year over year cut to the system. An additional cut of $100 million would reduce CSU funding to $2.0 billion and represent a 27 percent year-to-year reduction in state support.

“What was once unprecedented has unfortunately become normal, as for the second time in three years the CSU will be cut by well over $500 million,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed. “The magnitude of this cut, compounded with the uncertainty of the final amount of the reduction, will have negative impacts on the CSU long after this upcoming fiscal year has come and gone.”

The $2.1 billion in state funding allocated to the CSU in the 2011-12 budget will be the lowest level of state support the system has received since the 1998-99 fiscal year ($2.16 billion), and the university currently serves an additional 90,000 students. If the system is cut by an additional $100 million, state support would be at its lowest level since 1997-98.

In March, the legislature and governor approved an initial reduction of $500 million to the CSU. To address this initial cut, the legislature and governor agreed that the CSU would enroll approximately 10,000 fewer students this fall, and would apply an estimated $146 million from tuition increases already approved for fall 2011 to help offset the budget reduction. In addition, campus budgets were reduced by a combined $281 million, and the Chancellor’s office was cut by $10.8 million or 14 percent. These cuts will be accomplished primarily through various administrative and instructional efficiencies, as well as expenditure reductions in items including travel, information technology, equipment and book and journal purchases by libraries.

During the Board of Trustees meeting on July 12, the CSU plans to address the additional $150 million to $250 million reduction. In order to avert devastating and lasting damage to student access, student services and program quality, Chancellor Reed will recommend an additional tuition fee increase of 12 percent or $294 per semester effective for the fall 2011 term.

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About California State University
The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 412,000 students and 43,000 faculty and staff.  The CSU awards about 90,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million.  Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces.  The mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever changing needs of the people of California.  With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California. Connect with and learn more about the CSU at CSU Social Media.

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California State University Issues Response to Proposed 2011-12 Budget

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Reed noted "this budget will cut the CSU by at least $650 million - nearly one-fourth of state operating support - and the effects will be felt throughout our 23 campuses and among our 412,000 students."

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

With state lawmakers poised to vote this afternoon on the latest proposed budget, CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed issued the following statement:

“This budget is a great disappointment for the California State University.  It is a shame that the legislature was unable to reach a compromise that would have kept taxes at current levels and prevented further massive cuts to the public’s universities.

“This budget will cut the CSU by at least $650 million – nearly one-fourth of state operating support – and the effects will be felt throughout our 23 campuses and among our 412,000 students.  The proposed ‘trigger cut’ of another $100 million is especially problematic because the trigger won’t be pulled until classes for our last semester of the fiscal year have already started and it is too late for campuses to respond in any practical way.  This makes it impossible to plan and carry out our mission with any stability.

If the trigger is pulled, our cut will total $750 million.  State support for the CSU will be at its lowest level in 14 years, even though we currently serve 90,000 more students.  California’s economy cannot fully recover, nor can its future promise be fulfilled, by starving its universities.”

The “trigger cut” depends on state revenues, which are projected to increase. “If the new revenues don’t materialize by early next year, a trigger would automatically force $2.5 billion in further cuts,” including $100 million to the CSU, according to the San Jose Mercury News.

View the CSU Budget Central website.

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California State University Issues Statement on Impending Budget Deadline

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In a statement, Chancellor Reed urges legislators to reach an agreement with the governor to protect higher ed from "devastating further cuts."

With the temporary taxes the governor is counting on to balance the state’s budget expiring at the end of the month, CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed issued the following statement June 24:

“The state of California is at a crossroads. Governor Brown’s proposed budget, including a temporary tax bridge to an election at which Californians can decide the kind of state we will be in the future, is vital to the future of the California State University and present and future students. Time is short. I urge the members of the legislature, regardless of party, to reach agreement with the governor, whose plan is the only way forward to solve the state’s fiscal crisis and protect higher education from devastating further cuts.”

Voters could be asked to weigh in on temporary tax extensions in elections as early as this September, or as late as November 2012. Waiting could mean “an austerity budget — one with more massive cuts to schools, universities and public safety,” according to the San Jose Mercury News. Read more.

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California State University Issues Response to Democratic Budget Proposal

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In a statement, Chancellor Reed notes tuition could increase if the CSU sustains further budget cuts.

(June 15, 2011) – Chancellor Charles B. Reed issued the following statement.

“The legislature’s Democratic leadership intends to move a budget package today through the Senate and Assembly that closes the remaining $9.6 billion gap without the extensions of temporary tax increase proposed by Governor Brown. To close the remaining gap, the plan relies on a mix of additional cuts and revenue actions, including an additional cut to the CSU of $150 million. This would bring the total reduction in state support for the system to $650 million or 23 percent.

“The CSU’s budget has already been reduced by $500 million, and additional cuts to our campuses and programs are not a viable option if we are to maintain student access to quality programs, courses and services. Because of this, we have previously indicated that if our budget was cut further, we would have no choice but to increase revenue by raising student tuition and limiting enrollment. While the final budget is still to be approved, the proposed additional $150 million cut will impact our current students and those wishing to enroll at the CSU.”

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 412,000 students and 43,000 faculty and staff.  The CSU awards about 90,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million.  Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces.  The mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever changing needs of the people of California.  With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California. Connect with and learn more about the CSU at CSU Social Media.

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CSU Leaders Meet with Governor Brown To Advocate Against Additional Budget Cuts

Media Contacts:
Claudia Keith or Mike Uhlenkamp, CSU Public Affairs, (562) 951-4800

(May 24, 2011) – California State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed and more than a dozen CSU presidents and their campus delegations met with Governor Brown today to talk about the impact of budget cuts on the CSU. Already facing a $500 million reduction in funding, the CSU could face double that amount for 2011-12 if the Governor’s proposed tax extensions are rejected.

“We asked the Governor what we can do to help,” Reed told reporters following the meeting. “We want to do everything we can to get those four votes to extend these revenues. We will keep working toward that goal.”

“California is at a turning point,” said Governor Brown. “We need to decide whether we are going to adequately fund our universities or not. And, that is really the decision to be made first by the legislature and then by the people.”

The governor and legislature have already approved a budget that will reduce CSU funding by $500 million for the 2011-12 fiscal year. In response to the initial cut, CSU had announced that it will enroll fewer students this fall, and will apply an estimated $146 million from tuition increases already approved for fall 2011 to the budget reductions. Across the system, campuses will be asked to reduce their budgets by an additional $281 million, and the Chancellor’s office will be cut by $10.8 million or 14 percent.

“If there is an all cuts budget, we’ll be pushed to the wall,” added Reed. “We would have to increase tuition by over 30 percent, turn away 20,000 to 30,000 students, and we would still be $100 million short.”

In his May Revise, the governor warned that if his proposed temporary tax extensions are rejected, the CSU would face an additional $500 million cut, bringing the total to $1 billion. Earlier this month, the CSU outlined a contingency plan of action to address such an “all cuts” budget. Under this plan, CSU said it would “wait list” applications for winter and spring 2012 and consider an additional tuition fee increase of up to 32 percent. Under this worst case scenario, CSU estimates it could turn away 20,000 qualified applicants who would otherwise enroll for the winter/spring 2012 terms.

In addition to legislative visits to advocate on behalf of the CSU, on Monday, May 23, Chancellor Reed was presented with a resolution in recognition of the CSU’s 50th anniversary. Created by the signing of the Donahoe Higher Education Act, the CSU will have awarded over 2.6 million degrees to graduates after the conclusion of commencements scheduled for this May and June.

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About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 412,000 students and 43,000 faculty and staff. The CSU awards about 90,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million. Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces. The mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever changing needs of the people of California. With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California. Connect with and learn more about the CSU at CSU Social Media.