University Scholars Series Features Wendy Rouse on Origins of Women’s Self-Defense Movement

Wendy Rouse

Wendy Rouse

The University Scholar Series for fall 2019 will continue on Nov. 13 The event will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Library Room 225/229. The series is free and open to the public, with a light lunch provided.

Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement, 1890-1920

Associate Professor of History Wendy Rouse will present her research on the history of women and children in the Progressive Era during the final University Scholar Series talk of the semester. She will be discussing her latest book, Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement, 1890-1920. The book explores the way in which the proliferation of women’s self defense during the Progressive Era helped to debunk patriarchal myths about feminine weakness.

Her research has focused on methods of teaching history as well as women and children in the Progressive era, and she has penned a chapter on film portrayals of women’s suffrage for Hollywood or History? An Inquiry-Based Strategy for Using Film to Teach U.S. History and a journal article on Chinese exclusion and resistance published in Teaching History: A Journal of Methods. She is currently working on a project that examines the lives of queer suffragists in preparation of the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 2020.

Rouse has doctorate in American History from University of California, Davis, a master’s in history and archaeology from California State University, Sacramento, as well as a bachelor’s in history from CSU Sacramento.

The series is hosted by Provost Vincent Del Casino, and sponsored by the Academic Affairs Division, the Spartan Bookstore and the University Library.

For Love of a Veteran: Grad Student Erin Cerasaro Inspired by Husband’s Service

Erin Cerasaro, left, works with Professor Elena Klaw on research to support veterans on transitioning to college. She was inspired to pursue a master's by her husband, a former Marine.

Erin Cerasaro, left, works with Professor Elena Klaw on research to support veterans on transitioning to college. She was inspired to pursue a master’s by her husband, a former Marine.

Erin Cerasaro is a graduate student who is part of the Research and Experimental Psychology program in the College of Social Sciences at San Jose State University. When she first moved to the Bay Area and started thinking about completing a graduate degree, she reached out to SJSU Psychology Professor Elena Klaw to volunteer in her research lab.

“I was trying to figure out how to go back to school and I needed another letter,” she said. “I reached out to several professors and Dr. Klaw gave me the opportunity to volunteer in her lab.”

Cerasaro had initially started a graduate program years before in Southern California, but she took a leave of absence. Her husband, a veteran who served as a Marine in Afghanistan, inspired her to again pursue a graduate degree.

“He was medically separated from the Marines because of a back injury,” she said. “A chiropractor saved his life and helped him to be capable of living his life again.”

Her husband decided to pursue a Doctor of Chiropractic degree and they moved from San Diego when he enrolled in a program in Northern California.

“I watched him to go school and saw how he was thriving,” Cerasaro said. “I saw how much it meant to him to help people and it made me want to do that as well.”

The psychology program at SJSU and Klaw’s research lab offered that opportunity. Klaw is the director of the Veterans Embracing Transition (VET) Connect Program, which focuses on developing best practices for serving military veterans in their pursuit of higher education.

“I’ve learned to do qualitative research and it has been inspiring to watch her work,” Cerasaro said of Klaw. “She’s always on the go and it’s amazing to watch her teach a class, run VET Connect, run her lab, and work on Students Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. It’s helped me see where I want to be when I graduate. I want to go on to get my PhD.”

Cerasaro continues to look to her husband for motivation.

“He has had issues with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and I’ve watched him overcome so many obstacles to get where he is today, to maintain and go beyond what is normal for him,” she said, adding, “Studying for hours, exercising to maintain his back and the things he does to maintain his mental health just truly is an inspiration.”

San Jose State University Joins Amicus Brief in Support of DACA

Media Contacts:
Christine Hutchins, 408-924-1141, 650-644-9329, christine.hutchins@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, 408-799-3373, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

San Jose State University joined over 164 colleges and universities from across the country in signing an amicus brief supporting the approximately 700,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children and who hold Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This “friend of the court” brief in the case before the Supreme Court can be viewed and downloaded at this link: bit.ly/DACAAmicus.

Two years ago, on September 5, 2017, the administration rescinded DACA, an initiative that provides work permits and protection from deportation for undocumented students, often known as “Dreamers.” Oral arguments on this rescission will be held at the Supreme Court on November 12. The court could hand down a ruling as soon as February 2020, determining if Dreamers will lose the ability to live, study and work in the United States.

SJSU joined this “friend of the court” brief because the university believes that it is important to publicly show its unwavering support for DACA and immigrant students. 

“San Jose State is proud to be one of the most diverse campus communities in the nation, and it is a distinction that sets us apart from other public universities,” said SJSU President Mary A. Papazian. “We will continue to invest in the success of all of our students. The continued existence of DACA is essential, and this support affirms our values of inclusion, equity, respect and diversity of all cultures and people.”

SJSU encourages all eligible students and employees who have less than one year left of their DACA to submit their renewal application immediately. SJSU and CSU have many support services for DACA recipients, undocumented students and alumni in the campus community.

Support Services:

Diversity and inclusion are core values of San Jose State University and the California State University system. SJSU will continue to support DACA students and employees. The university will make every effort to provide a safe and welcoming campus environment for all students, faculty, staff, alumni and members of the campus community.

 

Today’s Tech Revolution Requires Some Humanity, Papazian Tells Sacramento Bee Readers in Opinion Piece

President Mary A. Papazain is a strong proponent of the value of the humanities, liberal arts and social sciences in higher education. Here, she served as a featured guest for the Frankenstein Bicentennial Monster Discussion Panel in 2018. Photo by David Schmitz.

An op-ed by San Jose State University President Mary A. Papazian published in the October 29 edition of the Sacramento Bee asserts that “the liberal arts must remain a vital part of higher education for the sake of the future of our students, our economy, and our society.”

Drawing largely on her academic background and expertise on the English Renaissance era, Papazian writes that “Just as the Renaissance opened mankind’s eyes to the reality that we do not sit at the center of the universe, today’s technology age has expanded our capabilities beyond the imaginations of only decades ago.” She goes on to note how Renaissance figures such as John Donne and Leonardo di Vinci exemplified many of the humanist principles lacking in today’s technology innovators.

Papazian said the messages conveyed in her op-ed piece are more vital than ever, particularly given the perils of technology and social media that have manifested in attacks on elections and the democratic process.

“It is vital that we understand the true impact of the technology-driven world in which we now live,” she said. “We need to be able to guard our global society against the dangers of this digital age. How we ensure that the next generation interacts more responsibility with technology than we have done this far is critical, and refocusing on the talents of humanists and liberal arts is an excellent place to start.”

In July, Papazian delivered a well-received speech at the Council of Graduate Schools Summer Workshop titled “Humanities for the 21st Century: Innovation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution.” There, she pointed out that “the hard skills learned from STEM programs are essential, but employers actually are desperate for candidates who have balanced their personal portfolios with both digital capabilities and human understanding.”

The partnering of STEM disciplines with the liberal arts, she asserted, can lead to true academic impact at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

“Students will work in groups all their professional lives, and they must be able to collaborate effectively with people from a broad array of backgrounds and working styles,” said Papazian. “They must be able to communicate in a variety of ways, using digital tools that we know are evolving with stunning rapidity. And they will be required to be creative and confident.

“Where better to learn all of this than in our labs and studios on our campuses? Where better to learn the capacity for these things than in our classrooms and our community-based projects?” she asks.

Developing the tools and the ability to talk about ethics, unconscious bias and the complexity of emotions within individuals and cultures, Papazian said, can help students recognize the choices that lead to collaboration rather than conflict.

“The liberal arts need to be a vital part of the education spectrum if we are to have any hope of addressing the problems we are seeing and reading about on almost a daily basis,” she said.

“Our challenge—and our opportunity—is to seize the moment to influence and shape history meaningfully in this, our present Renaissance.”

 

Campus Message on Information Regarding Possible PG&E Power Shutoff Oct. 29–30

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on October 28, 2019 at 12:02 p.m. from President Mary A. Papazian. We will post updates on this web page as new information becomes available.

Dear Campus Community,

Today, the SJSU campus is open.

Last Thursday, October 24, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) announced a Public Safety Power Shutoff event (PSPS) due to weather conditions including gusty winds and dry conditions that created a heightened fire risk which impacted a number of counties and residents living in their respective cities. Due to the next anticipated extreme wind event from Tuesday, October 29 through Wednesday, October 30, PG&E may be issuing another PSPS. You can check PG&E’s potential PSPS outage maps in advance to see if the power will be shut off at your home or a family member’s home. 

For faculty and staff, if you live in an area impacted by last week’s power outage, contact your supervisor if you are not able to make it to work. If you need to take time off during this impacted period, your time away will not be charged against your personal, vacation, or sick leave time. 

For faculty, who might have students affected, please provide them with flexible alternatives to continue to move forward in the class even if they can’t be in attendance. 

For students who live in an impacted area, please contact your professors right away so that they understand your situation.

San Jose State University is closely monitoring weather alerts and advisories from PG&E and will notify you if our campus will be affected. Please continue to check the following SJSU channels for updates: 

In the case of an emergency, Alert SJSU is utilized for timely, campus alert notifications. Faculty and staff must enroll through their My SJSU account. We strongly urge you to review your contact information by logging onto your “My SJSU” account and clicking on the Alert SJSU tab. Students are automatically enrolled. If you are not receiving Alert SJSU, please check with your cell phone provider. For more information: Alert SJSU

Lastly, as a reminder, here are things you can do to prepare for an outage and during an outage: PG&E Preparation Steps

Additional resources:

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SJSU and IBM Announce New Collaboration—First of its Kind on the West Coast

Preparing Students for high tech jobs of the future

Photo by Francisco Mendoza, ’21 Photography/San Jose State University

On October 18, 2019, San Jose State University and IBM announced a strategic collaboration designed to provide today’s students with advanced skills needed for high tech jobs of the future.

The use of emerging technologies such as the Internet of things, cloud computing, artificial intelligence (AI), data science, security, and blockchain are growing. AI is expected to contribute $15.7T to the global economy by 2030* as the U.S. skills gap widens. Over 11.5 million workers in the United States alone may need to be retrained or reskilled as a result of AI and intelligent automation alone in the next three years.**

“It makes perfect sense for Silicon Valley’s public university to collaborate with IBM, a giant in the tech world,” said San Jose State University President Mary A. Papazian. “Growing our research and scholarship is a priority of ours and ties directly to our student success goals. This collaboration will help San Jose State students gain the skills they need to compete in tomorrow’s workforce, and it will solidify SJSU as the top provider of talent to Silicon Valley companies.”    

The strategic skills-based collaboration, the first of its kind on the west coast, will feature three key components on campus: IBM Academic Initiative, SJSU Technology Office, and IBM Skills Academy.  

  • IBM Academic Initiative. IBM will provide a unique, customized portal for SJSU students, staff, and faculty to access IBM Academic Initiatives resources for teaching and research purposes. The Academic Initiative also provides faculty and researchers with IBM’s cloud technology and software in fast-growing fields such as AI, blockchain, cybersecurity, data science, high-performance computing, and quantum computing. 
  • SJSU Technology Office. IBM will help SJSU establish a technology office to support faculty research, student growth, and campus-wide innovation through regular workshops and training. A cybersecurity training center will also be developed and located on the SJSU campus in the future.
  • IBM Skills Academy. This Skills Academy will offer practical curriculum, learning tools, and labs created by IBM subject experts. Courses will cover a variety of advanced skills, and SJSU’s Information Technology department will evaluate pilot programs in data science, AI, data engineering and cybersecurity. IBM’s new AI tools and related education initiatives are drawn from methods and technologies IBM developed in-house to drive its own workforce transformation. The IBM Skills Academy transforms how cultures and people will operate with digital technology including ethics and human bias in coding.

“Skills are the most important issue of our time and we need to fully equip students with the right skills to participate in the digital economy,” said Naguib Attia, vice president, IBM Global University Programs. “Through this new collaboration, we will work closely with San Jose State University to ensure curricula aligns with industry needs and trends so both students and faculty can earn digital badges and develop the skills they need today, for the jobs of tomorrow.”

The collaboration between San Jose State University and IBM takes effect immediately.

**PwC’s Global Artificial Intelligence Study: Exploiting the AI Revolution

**IBM Institute of Business Value, “The Enterprise Guide to Closing the Skills Gap”, September 2019.

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University Library Hosts Diverse Exhibits For Fall Semester

Treasures from the Vault 

Sheet Music

Medieval musical notation

Writing quills, missal leaves, rabbit skin glue, agate burnisher, medieval music and notation, illuminated manuscripts—are by all means a rare glimpse of a fascinating moment in history. 

SJSU Special Collections & Archives celebrates the rich and beautiful legacy of medieval history with a new exhibit, Treasures from the Vault: Medieval Manuscripts and Beyond, that is on display on the fifth-floor exhibit gallery of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library from Aug. 15 through Dec. 9.

The exhibit showcases illuminated manuscripts and incunabula made in the late middle ages that draw from a fascinating array of subjects like medieval music, personal devotional books and religious scholarship.

Two SJSU students from the MLIS program Jacob Rabinowitz and Fiona Du Brock, came upon these illuminated manuscripts while working on a cataloging project, and decided they should be shared with others. 

“These beautiful handmade documents were sitting in the vault without having any indication that they exist,” said Rabinowitz. “I like the idea of getting them available to the public. The archives and special collections exist for people so they can use our materials for research.”

The exhibit is a unique opportunity for people to witness handwritten documents that go back hundreds of years. 

“These are the oldest materials we have in our archives,” Du Brock added. “It should be noted that all of the manuscripts on display are fragments, we don’t have any complete manuscripts.”

Both Rabinowitz and Du Brock thought a cool display of this kind would pique general interest as well as make people engage more with the archives. 

The special collection library figures prominently in the university map as it supports diverse teaching and research needs of students, faculty and the larger community. 

The Art of Remembrance

The University Library hosted an opening reception for the Art of Remembrance exhibit. Photo by Lesley Seacrist.

The University Library hosted an opening reception for the Art of Remembrance exhibit. Photo by Lesley Seacrist.

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library often displays exhibits curated from its special collections, from other departments on campus or from arts organizations that enrich the community and appeal to a diverse audience.  

This month the library is holding its 13th Annual Art of Remembrance Altar Exhibit in collaboration with the San José Multicultural Artists Guild. The exhibit features traditional and contemporary visual arts and altars by local and Bay Area artists, in the tradition of Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). 

This visually vibrant Mexican tradition offers a space for the community to pause, reflect and remember the spirit of their loved ones by celebrating their legacy. Altars are elaborately decorated with flowers, photos, mementos and food for their departed loved ones.

The exhibit, which opened for the public on Oct. 10 with a reception featuring tamales, pan de muerto and hot chocolate, is curated by SJSU Librarian Kathryn Blackmer Reyes and BFA student Nanzi Muro. The reception also marked the official launch of $50k & Beyond, a campaign for the Africana, Asian American, Chicano and Native American (AAACNA) Studies Center Endowment to support the Center’s important work. The exhibit is open through Nov. 8.

Bay Area Pride

In addition, the Bay Area Pride: 50 Years of LGBTQ History, Politics, and Culture Exhibit will be on display through Dec. 20 in the Special Collections Exhibit Hall on the Fifth Floor. The exhibit includes original photos from the Ted Sahl Archives, Billy DeFrank LGBT Silicon Valley Community Center Papers and much more. A reception will be held in the Schiro Room on Oct. 17, from 4 to 6 p.m.

 

Larry and Elaine Sparling Give $500,000 to the Spartan Athletics Center

Media contacts
Lawrence Fan, SJSU Athletics media relations director, 408-924-1217, lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, SJSU media relations specialist, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University is pleased to announce that it has received a $500,000 gift commitment from Larry and Elaine Sparling. The gift will support the Spartan Athletics Center, the future home of San Jose State football and men’s and women’s soccer.

“Larry and Elaine Sparling believe in the direction of this Athletics program and understand the importance of the Spartan Athletics Center,” said Marie Tuite, San Jose State’s director of intercollegiate athletics. “I spend quite a bit of time with this wonderful couple and I can tell you they support the efforts of our coaches and student-athletes. They are so positive and encouraging when it comes to the important work our coaches are doing. They are terrific Spartans and we are so thankful and appreciative of their generous gift.”

The Spartan Athletics Center will include new locker rooms, an auditorium, coaches’ offices, position-specific classrooms, stadium game day suites and a state-of-the-art athletic training room that will be accessible to all student-athletes.

About the Sparlings

Elaine and Larry Sparling.

Elaine and Larry Sparling. Photo by David Schmitz.

Though the Sparlings did not graduate from San Jose State, they are longtime supporters of Spartan football. Over the years, they have driven their RV all over the U.S. to watch the football team compete. The Sparlings are leadership donors to the Spartan Athletics Fund and attend many Spartan sporting events. They believe that by supporting San Jose State, they are investing in their community and helping their neighbors and friends succeed.

“I love the fact that at San Jose State we can be so connected to everybody, from the coaching staff to the athletic director and the university president,” said Larry. “We know how crucial the Spartan Athletics Center is for all the athletes at San Jose State. I like donating to student-athletes because we can tell how much it means to them to play their sport and get a degree from a great college.”

In 1966, the Sparling family took over Tiny Tots, a cotton diaper home pick-up and delivery service based in Campbell. At that time, they had only 80 customers, two Kenmore washer-dryers and a delivery vehicle. The couple helped grow the business before Larry’s sister and brother-in-law took the reins. Over the past 50 years, Tiny Tots has laundered more than 680 million diapers. Tiny Tots has offered free Diapering 101 classes to members of the community since 1980, as well as monthly support groups, workshops and CPR trainings. Larry went on to found Healthcare Laundry Services.

“This gift from Larry and Elaine Sparling is a tremendous support to the university and our athletics program,” said Interim Vice President of University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation Peter Smits. “By investing in the Spartan Athletics Center, they are establishing a legacy that will help countless generations of Spartan student-athletes. We thank them for their contribution to San Jose State.”

“The Sparlings have always been very dedicated supporters of SJSU Athletics,” said SJSU Football Head Coach Brent Brennan. “This gift will make a huge difference to our football program, as well as Spartan soccer and all of athletics. Thank you, Larry and Elaine!”

To learn how you can support Spartan Athletics, please contact Joshua Thiel, deputy athletics director for advancement, at 408-924-1697 or joshua.thiel@sjsu.edu.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study—offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is proud of the accomplishments of its more than 270,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

About San Jose State Athletics

San Jose State sponsors 22 (nine men’s and 13 women’s) NCAA Division I intercollegiate sports programs for approximately 470 student-athletes annually. In football, the Spartans are a member of Division I’s Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the NCAA’s highest level of competition.

The Spartans’ primary conference affiliation is with the Mountain West. Selected teams belong to the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF), the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) and the Golden Coast Conference (GCC).

San Jose State has 10 NCAA team championships and 52 NCAA individual titles. Sixty-two Spartans have competed in one or more Olympic Games. San Jose State athletes have won seven gold, six silver and seven bronze medals at the Olympics.

Annually, about one-third of the student-athlete population earns either an institutional, conference or national recognition based on outstanding academic performance.

 

SJSU Asst. Professor Wins Rona Jaffe Foundation 2019 Writers’ Award

SJSU Assistant Professor Selena Anderson, left, is one of six emerging writers to receive the Rona Jaffe Writer's Award. Photo by Star Black

SJSU Assistant Professor Selena Anderson, left, is one of six emerging writers to receive the Rona Jaffe Writer’s Award.
Photo by Star Black

SJSU Assistant Professor of Creative Writing Selena Anderson said she has always been a reader and a writer by extension.

“I wanted to write, maybe because it involved reading,” she said. “I took a short story class when I was a junior at (University of) Texas under a really amazing professor and then I went to Columbia where I had the most beautiful reading life.”

She said the best lesson she took away with her from her MFA was to read with purpose.

Selena Anderson reads from her recent work at NYU after receiving a 2019 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award. Photo by Star Black

Selena Anderson reads from her recent work at NYU after receiving a 2019 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award.
Photo by Star Black

This September, Anderson was among six emerging female authors to be honored by the Rona Jaffe Foundation. The recipients were chosen through a rigorous selection process conducted by a small committee of established writers who serve anonymously. The recipients this year received $40,000 each at a reception Sept. 12 that was followed by a reading on Sept 13 at New York University’s Creative Writing Program Reading Series at the Lillian Vernon Writers House.

“Back in graduate school some of my favorite writers—Rivka Galchen, Rebecca Curtis and Tracy K. Smith—were winners of the Rona Jaffe Award, so it was always on my radar,” she said. “There’s nothing quite like it, and I’m so thrilled to be in the sisterhood.”

Anderson said that when the director of the foundation called to tell her she had been selected as a 2019 recipient, she tried to sound cool but was silently jumping up and down.

“Then mid-call my husband, who always has amazing timing, rolled up on his bike and we silently jumped in a circle,” she said.

Anderson joined SJSU’s faculty in 2017. She is the author of two novels, Quinella and Cenisa, Samira, Monet, and is currently working on a collection of short stories entitled Tenderoni. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Georgia Review, Bomb, Callaloo, and Fence, among others.

From her recently finished collection of short stories, “Godmother Tea” appears in Oxford American. The story is about a girl who makes bad decisions and then discovers a godmother who pushes her to reevaluate her life choices. She is also finishing a novel about three best friends who write letters to men in prison.

As a teacher, she encourages her students to ask “the questions they have as writers and let that inquiry direct them as they read.”

“You always aim to meet the work on its own terms—do unto others, as they say—be generous and honest and always come from a place of discovery,” she said. “Remember why you love stories in the first place.”

The Rona Jaffe Foundation press release describes Anderson’s work as pushing “the boundaries of realism and fantasy as she explores and interrogates the ideas of race, identiy, and Black womanhood in the American South.” Anderson has received fellowships from the Kimbilio Center, the MacDowell Colony, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

Anderson will use her Writer’s Award for childcare over the next year while she finalizes her manuscripts, and begins work on a new project about the Texas-to-Mexico underground railroad.

“It’s an honor to win the RJF award and have the support of those who’ve for 25 years worked tirelessly to help usher some really gorgeous books into the world,” Anderson said. “I know I’ll do them proud.”

Update: Campus Food Eateries Gradually Re-opening – October 10, 2019

Campus Message on food eateries at Diaz Compean Student Union on Oct. 10


Editor’s note: The following update was posted on October 10, 2019, at 1:15 p.m.

As Facilities, Development and Operations (FDO) has been able to quickly address unexpected facilities maintenance at the Diaz Compean Student Union today, hot food items are gradually re-opening at this time in the following sequence

  • Panda Express
  • Steak ‘n Shake
  • Taco Bell
  • Japanese Kitchen 

Alternative Options Remain the Same: The following eateries also continue to be open at this time:

  • The Commons dining hall (between Washburn and Joe West Hall)
    • For today, there is a special promotion of an “All You Care To Eat” buffet for $7 per person. 
  • Paseo Fresh (Student Union)
  • Student Union Market (Student Union)
  • Starbucks (Student Union)
  • Subway (Student Union)
  • Tea Degree (Student Union)
  • Jamba Juice (Student Union)
  • Fresh on Fourth (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library)
  • Village Market (Campus Village Building B)
    • Options include pizza, chicken strips, and a variety of grab-n-go items. 
  • Ginger Market  (MacQuarrie Hall)
    • Options include sushi and banh mi sandwiches

We will continue to provide updates when additional information is available.


Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on October 10, 2019  at 12:02 p.m. from Charlie Faas, vice president of administration and finance. 

Dear Campus Community,

Due to unexpected facilities maintenance at the Diaz Compean Student Union today, hot food items cannot be offered. The following eateries will be closed until further notice

  • Panda Express
  • Steak ‘n Shake
  • Taco Bell
  • Japanese Kitchen 

Alternative Options: The following eateries will remain open at this time:

  • The Commons Dining Hall (between Washburn and Joe West Hall)
    • For today, there is a special promotion of an “All You Care To Eat” buffet for $7 per person
  • Paseo Fresh (Student Union)
  • Student Union Market (Student Union)
  • Starbucks (Student Union)
  • Subway (Student Union)
  • Tea Degree (Student Union)
  • Jamba Juice (Student Union)
  • Fresh on Fourth (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library)
  • Village Market (Campus Village Building B)
    • Options include pizza, chicken strips and a variety of grab-n-go items
  • Ginger Market  (MacQuarrie Hall)
    • Options include sushi and banh mi sandwiches

We will provide updates when additional information is available.

SJSU to Host Virtual Adobe Creative Jam Oct. 11-12

Donna Caldwell, a senior solutions consultant, leads the Adobe XD bootcamp for students who competed in the Adobe Creative Jam April 18, 2019. Photo by Robert C. Bain

Donna Caldwell, a senior solutions consultant, leads the Adobe XD bootcamp for students who competed in the Adobe Creative Jam April 18, 2019. Photo by Robert C. Bain

San Jose State University will host a unique virtual Adobe Creative Jam this month with participants from seven additional California State Universities. The event will kick off on Oct. 11 at 1 p.m. in Dwight Bentel Hall 117, and will end on Oct. 12. 

This two-day event builds on the success of a spring Digital Detox event in which SJSU students learned how to use Adobe XD, received portfolio and resume reviews, and created their own prototype app.

Spartans have many reasons to join the jam. John Delacruz, Associate Professor, Advertising and an Adobe Education Leader, sees this as a valuable learning opportunity for SJSU students who will eventually step into fast-paced industries. 

“The Adobe association adds value and weight to the student experience,” he said. “The digital badge they carry on their LinkedIn profiles and resumes that the company may provide them as participatory evidence is something that they don’t just get from the most progressive classroom. The value from collaborations like these give students a step up once they are looking for jobs.”

The jam is designed to be a fun event for students coming from diverse backgrounds and disciplines as they connect virtually. In true Spartan spirit, the goal is to rise above challenges, learning to work in a team, and developing creative skills and their applications in a time-sensitive environment. And the icing on the cake is that students can win cash prizes, will receive free food, and revel in the camaraderie on the team. 

How the Adobe Creative Jam will work: 

Students who sign up will be grouped into teams of three to five to work on a creative brief that’s topical and relevant. Speakers from Adobe and other design professionals will join the students via Crowdcast to share tips and advice on the field. There will also be a tutorial, a deep dive into Adobe XD—a design software required to accomplish the project.

Teams will then have two hours to brainstorm ideas, think of solutions, and come up with a prototype design, following which each team will get two to three minutes to present their ideas. 

A set of finalists from each campus will improve their ideas overnight and present them again to the judges virtually on Saturday. A fresh set of judges will select overall winners. The winning teams will receive $250 each, giveaways from Adobe along with plenty of other goodies. 

Delacruz is an advocate of engaging students in experiential learning and pedagogy, peer mentoring, and other exciting activities that happen in the creative field. He stresses that industries work on quick turnaround of projects, and students need to be aware of certain tools to get the work done effectively, and

“This is where Adobe chips in with the tools that creative industries are built on,” he said.

 

FAQ – PG&E Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) Event

The latest PG&E public safety power shutoff and campus information.


Editor’s Note: The following update was posted on October 10 at 8:45 p.m.

San Jose State University remains open on Friday, October 11 for classes and all activities. As PG&E restores power to areas of San Jose, students, faculty and staff are encouraged to use public transportation. This is the final update on the PGE4Me Public Safety Power Shutoff.


Editor’s Note: The following update was posted on October 10 at 6:40 a.m.

San Jose State University will remain open today, Thursday, October 10 for classes and all activities. PG&E’s anticipated Public Safety Power Shutoff began last night in the eastern foothills and southern San Jose area near the Almaden Valley, but it does not affect the SJSU campus. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to use public transportation whenever possible this week. Further updates will be posted as new information becomes available


Editor’s Note: The following update was posted on October 9 at 8:45 p.m.

San Jose State University will remain open tomorrow, Thursday, October 10 for classes and all activities. PG&E’s anticipated Public Safety Power Shutoff tonight in the eastern foothills and southern San Jose area near the Almaden Valley area is not expected to affect the campus. SJSU encourages students, faculty and staff to use public transportation whenever possible this week. Further updates will be posted as new information becomes available.


Editor’s Note: The following update was posted on October 9 at 4:45 p.m.

PG&E has delayed the previously announced Public Safety Power Shutoff until 8:00 p.m. tonight. The power shutoff is still expected to occur in the eastern foothills and southern San Jose area near Almaden Valley. At this time, no power outage is expected in downtown San Jose.

San Jose State University will remain open for classes and all activities on Thursday, October 10. SJSU recommends faculty, staff and students use public transportation whenever possible this week to limit congestion on city streets. Further updates will be posted as new information becomes available.


Editor’s Note: The following update was posted on October 9 at 6:30 a.m.

San Jose State University will remain open for classes and all activities on Wednesday, October 9. Further updates will be posted as new information becomes available.


Editor’s Note: The following update was posted on October 8 at 8:54 p.m.

PG&E’s planned Public Safety Power Shutoff is still in place. The National Weather Service has no changes to its forecast.

As of this time, the SJSU campus will be open for classes and all activities on Wednesday, October 9.

Updates will be posted as additional information becomes available.


Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on October 8, 2019. We will post updates on this web page as new information becomes available.

Campus Message on Information Regarding Possible PG&E Power Shutoff Oct. 9 – 10. Sent on Oct. 8, at 5:30 p.m. from Vincent J. Del Casino Jr., Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Dear Campus Community,

As of Tuesday, October 8, the SJSU campus is not expected to be impacted and we anticipate remaining open.

On Monday, October 7, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) announced a Public Safety Power Shutoff event (PSPS) due to potential weather conditions including gusty winds and dry conditions that create a heightened fire risk. This high wind event is forecast to begin on Wednesday, October 9 at approximately 4 a.m. and continue through the evening hours of Thursday, October 10.

PG&E may proactively turn off power to customers in 30 counties, including Santa Clara County in the Bay Area. While customers in high fire-threat areas are more likely to be affected, PG&E advises that more than 5 million electric customers across Northern California could have their power shut off. This is because the energy system relies on power lines working together to provide electricity across California.

You can check in advance to see if the power will be shut off at your home or a family member’s home here.

To reiterate, the SJSU campus is not expected to be impacted and we anticipate remaining open. We operate our own Central Energy Plant which supplies much of our own electricity. We also have back-up generators to cover key areas that might be impacted. The campus will continue to supply power to critical infrastructure.
For faculty and staff, if you live in an area impacted by this power outage, contact your supervisor if you are not able to make it to work. If you need to take time off during this impacted period, your time away will not be charged against your personal, vacation or sick leave time. For faculty, who might have students affected, please provide them with flexible alternatives to continue to move forward in the class even if they can’t be in attendance. For students who live in an impacted area, please contact your professors right away so that they understand your situation.

In the event that our campus will be impacted, all residence hall students will receive specific guidance from University Housing Services regarding contingency plans including generators for residence halls as well as food service plans.

Essential personnel who work in University Housing Services, SJSU Dining Commons, Diaz Compean Student Union, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, Spartan Recreation and Aquatic Center, Student Health Center, University Police and Strategic Communications personnel will be required to report to campus. If you are essential personnel and are unable to get to campus due to the power outage, contact your supervisor who will make arrangements to cover your duties.

Furthermore, we are collecting information about research spaces that require power and how to support them if we lose power. Faculty who have any concerns about research spaces should contact John Skyberg, senior director of facility services, at john.skyberg@sjsu.edu.

Here are things you can do to prepare for an outage and during an outage:

PG&E Preparation Steps

San Jose State University is closely monitoring weather alerts and advisories from PG&E and will notify you if PG&E decides to shut off power on campus. We will continue to provide updates to keep you informed.

  • Watch for SJSU text alerts on Tuesday (10/8) and Wednesday (10/9) as more information becomes available
  • We will provide updates on the SJSU Newsroom on Tuesday (10/8) at 9:00 p.m. and Wednesday (10/9) at 7:00 a.m. Additional updates will be provided throughout the week
  • Follow us on Twitter at #SJSU for updates

Alert SJSU is SJSU’s campus alert notification system. We strongly urge you to review your contact information by logging onto your “My SJSU” account and clicking on the Alert SJSU tab. Students are automatically enrolled, but if you are not receiving SJSU alerts, check with your cell phone provider.  Faculty and staff must enroll through their My SJSU Account. For more information: Alert SJSU

Additional resources:


Frequently Asked Questions

Updated as of October 8, 2019

What is a PG&E public safety power shutoff?

For public safety, it may be necessary for PG&E to turn off electricity when gusty winds and dry conditions, combined with heightened fire risk, are forecasted. This is called a “Public Safety Power Shutoff” or “PSPS.”

When is the PG&E public safety power shutdown?

Weather conditions, including potential fire risk, have been forecast that may impact electric service to the PG&E service area.  If a decision is made to turn the power off, it will occur between Wednesday, October 9 at approximately 4 a.m. and continue through the evening hours of Thursday, October 10.

Will campus be shut down?

As of Tuesday, October 8 at (5:30 p.m.), the SJSU campus is not impacted and we anticipate remaining open. We have our own Central Energy Plant which supplies much of our own electricity. We also have backup generators to cover key areas that might be impacted. The campus will continue to supply power to critical infrastructure

How Will SJSU communicate updates?

  • Watch for SJSU text alerts on Tuesday (10/8) evening or Wednesday (10/9) as more information becomes available
  • We will provide updates on the SJSU Newsroom at 9 p.m. and 7 a.m.
  • Follow us on Twitter at #SJSU for updates

How will I know if PG&E decides to cut off the power?

PG&E updates can be found here.

How can I find out if the campus is affected or if my house is affected?

You can check on the PSPS of any specific address at: https://www.pge.com/en_US/safety/emergency-preparedness/natural-disaster/wildfires/psps-service-impact-map.page

Will campus housing be open?

Yes, all residence halls will remain open. In the event that SJSU is impacted by PG&E’s Public Safety Power Shutoff, all residence hall students will receive specific guidance from University Housing Services regarding contingency plans including generators for residence halls as well as foodservice plans.

Will faculty or staff need to use sick or vacation time if the campus shuts down?

No, if campus shuts down faculty and staff will not be required to use personal, vacation, or sick leave during the closure.

Do essential personnel need to report to campus in case of a closure?

Yes, essential personnel including those who work in University Housing Services, SJSU Dining Commons, Diaz Compean Student Union, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, Spartan Recreation and Aquatic Center and Student Health Center will be required to report to campus.

As a supervisor, what should I do to support my team members?

We need to be as flexible as possible with the directly impacted areas. We will not be requiring people to take a vacation, personal, or sick leave if they live in an area directly impacted by the shutoff. Please do your best to cover the functions of your area. If you need additional guidance, contact your supervisor.

What should I do to prepare for a power shutdown?

  • Create a safety plan for all members of your family, including pets
  • Stock up on non-perishable food
  • Prepare an emergency supply kit
  • Charge your mobile phone
  • Have flashlights ready.  Avoid using candles
  • Have a battery-powered or crank radio
  • Stock up on batteries
  • Keep cash on hand and a full tank of gas

Additional resources:

University Scholars Series Features Craig Simpson Talk on Kent State Shootings

Craig Simpson

Craig Simpson

The University Scholar Series for fall 2019 will continue on Oct 9. The event will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Library Room 225/229. The series is free and open to the public, with a light lunch provided.

The Kent State Shootings at 50: Rage, Reflection and Remembrance

Director of Special Collections and Archives at SJSU Craig Simpson will present his work on Oct. 9. He is the co-author of Above the Shots: An Oral History of the Kent State Shootings, which was nominated for a National Council on Public History Book Award. Simpson and his co-author examined how the detailed, varied and at-times contradictory accounts challenge and deepen the understanding of the events on May 4, 1970, when four Kent State University students were killed and nine others were wounded by members of the Ohio National Guard.

Simpson will explore how their methodology led to both obstacles and opportunities, resulting in a text departing in some ways from its original conception, yet one that fulfilled their objective to show how “The Long 1960s,” and the conflicts from that era that still rage in our own, can be illuminated at the intersection of individual and collective memory. He will also discuss potential avenues for further research as we near the 50th anniversary of this pivotal event in contemporary American history.

Simpson has a master’s of Library and Information Science from Kent State University and a master’s in history from Marquette University. He is a certified archivist and an oral historian. Before joining SJSU in 2018, he served as a special collections librarian at Kent State University Libraries and led the Kent State Shootings Oral History Project, a digital collection of more than 100 interviews about the events that occurred on May 4, 1970. He has also served as the Lilly Library Manuscripts Archivists at Indiana University.

SJSU’s Minghui Diao Publishes Latest Research on Air Pollution

Two photos compare the way the sky near campus looks on a day with low air pollution vs. a day with high air pollution.

Two photos compare the way the sky near campus looks on a day with low air pollution vs. a day with high air pollution.

SJSU Assistant Professor of Meteorology and Climate Science Minghui Diao’s research focuses on understanding how dirty the air is that we breathe. Her latest research has been published in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association. In the article Diao, Tracey Holloway and 15 coauthors from 14 universities and federal agencies assess state-of-art estimates for fine particulate matter. Their research is part of an overarching project funded by NASA’s Applied Science Program, and is being conducted by the NASA Health and Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (HAQAST).

The researchers looked at some of the limitations of standard air quality management monitors. Air quality monitors managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have limited coverage on the ground. The closest ground monitor may be a few blocks away, or hundreds of miles away, from the location being measured. For locations with fewer monitors, it is more difficult to assess the impact of air quality on public health.

Among all types of pollutants, fine particulate matter, particularly PM2.5, have the largest impact on human health. PM2.5 describes particles smaller than 2.5 micrometers. They are so small that twenty PM2.5 particles can fit side by side along the diameter of a strand of hair. These tiny particles can cause severe health impacts to human beings when they enter the bloodstream.

A highlight of the article is that it demonstrates how NASA satellite data play an important role for locations that used to be missing air quality information. Advancement in satellite technology helps to “see” air pollution in those locations. The resulting data will contribute to future development of epidemiology studies and air quality management efforts, while raising public awareness of air pollution’s impact on the environment and health.

“This is a new era during which we will get to know what is affecting the air quality in our back yards, with a helpful view from space,” said Diao.

SJSU to Host Revisiting the 1968 Chicano Commencement Symposium Oct. 11

In June 1968, Chicano students staged a walkout from then-San José State College commencement exercises to protest the lack of Chicano student enrollment, faculty members and related programs. The legacy of this activism is still felt today at San Jose State University.

To commemorate the events of 1968, SJSU is hosting a symposium on Oct. 11, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Diaz Compean Student Union Ballroom. The event is free, with lunch and refreshments provided. Tickets are available through Eventbrite. A livestream will be available for those unable to attend.

“Less than 1 percent of the San Jose State College graduating class of 1968 were Chicanos. This mirrored the meager presence of Chicanos on campus, despite a county population in excess of 12 percent,” said Armando Valdez, ’67 Sociology “The walkout brought this glaring disparity into sharp relief and spurred more responsive policies and practices. The symposium examines the legacy of Chicano Commencement, the persistence and impact of institutional changes resulting from the walkout, and also identifies current disparities and shortfalls that demand attention.”

Schedule of Event

9 a.m.

Registration and continental breakfast

10 a.m.

Welcome

10:15 a.m.

Panel 1

“Legacy, Context and Significance of Chicano Commencement: The Big Picture” 

Moderator:

Armando Valdez, PhD

Armando Valdez, ’67 Sociology, earned a PhD at Stanford University. At San José State, he organized Student Initiative, the first Chicano student organization on campus, and subsequently the Mexican American Student Confederation (MASC), which organized the 1968 Chicano Commencement. Valdez published El Plan de Santa Barbara, and played a leadership role in La Causa Educational Center, the Southwest Network, which supported Chicano alternative schools; Bilingual Broadcasting Productions at KBBF, the nation’s first bilingual public radio station; the Stanford Center for Chicano Research; LatinoNet, the nation’s first Internet platform developed by a community of color; and HealthPoint Communications, a health communications research institute to address health inequities.

Panelists:

Al Camarillo, PhD

Al Camarillo is the past president of the Organization of American Historians and the American Historical Association-Pacific Coast Branch, and has been a member of Stanford University’s history department since 1975. One of the founding scholars of Mexican American history and Chicano studies, he received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Rockefeller Foundation and was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford Humanities Center. The seven-time author’s newest books: The Racial Borderhoods of America: Mexican Americans and the Changing Ethnic/Racial Landscapes of Cities, 1850-2000 (2020, Oxford University Press). He was founding director of CCSRE and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research, and founding executive director of the Inter-University Program in Latino Research.

Juan Gómez-Quiñones, PhD

Juan Gómez-Quiñones is professor of history at UCLA and considered the founder of Chicano history as an academic discipline. He specializes in the fields of political, labor, intellectual and cultural history. Since 1969, Gómez-Quiñones has been active in higher education, culture activities promotion and Chicano studies efforts. He has published more than 30 books or monographs, has served as director of the Chicano Studies Research Center at UCLA and was a founding co-editor of Aztlan, International Journal of Chicano Studies Research. A recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, he has served on the California State University and Colleges Board of Trustees, the WASC Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities and as a member of the board of directors of numerous civic organizations.

David Montejano, PhD

David Montejano is a professor in the Graduate School at the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, he was professor of ethnic studies and history, and chair of the Center for Research on Social Change at the University of California, Berkeley. A native of San Antonio, Texas, he received a B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin and a Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University. Among his publications are two prize-winning historical works, Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas,1836-1986, and Quixote’s Soldiers: A Local History of the Chicano Movement,1966-1981, both published by the University of Texas Press.

Carlos Muñoz, PhD

Carlos Muñoz Jr., the son of working-class refugees of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, became a Chancellor’s Public Scholar, Edward A. Dickson Distinguished Emeritus Professor, professor emeritus of ethnic studies and an affiliated faculty member in the Center for Latin American Studies at UC, Berkeley. The founding chair of California State University, Los Angeles’ Chicano studies department and founding chair of the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies, Muñoz is an expert on ethnic and racial politics, multiculturalism and diversity, immigration, civil and human rights, and affirmative action. An award-winning author, Muñoz co-founded the Institute for Multiracial Justice and Latinos Unidos.

11:30 a.m.

Break

Noon

Panel 2 and Lunch

“Impetus of Chicano Commencement 1967-1968: Oral Histories of the Activists”

Moderator

Rigo Chacon

For 32 years, Rigo Chacon was the South Bay Bureau Chief for KGO T.V., the ABC station in San Francisco. Early in his career, Rigo recognized the importance of an emerging Silicon Valley and made it his mission to establish a bureau in San Jose. When other television stations noticed KGO’s success, more south bay bureaus were established thus making Santa Clara County a major American broadcasting region. Rigo came to San Jose in 1961 as part of a farm working family. At San Jose High School, the future triple Emmy Award winner was junior class and Student Body President before attending San Jose State University where he has served as adjunct professor for future broadcasters. Rigo is the founder of Abrazos and Books, a nonprofit entity that awards scholarships to high school seniors in Santa Clara County. Abrazos and Books also helps children who are victims of natural or man-made catastrophes. Rigo is married and the father of four adult sons, six grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Panelists:

Norma Fierro

Norma Fierro is the child of parents who immigrated to the Santa Clara Valley from Mexico in the 1920s. As a student at San José State, she was vice president of Student Initiative and the Mexican American Student Confederation, later leading a 32-year career as a bilingual educator in K-12 districts with a high population of Chicano students. The coordinator of the Association of Mexican Americans in Alum Rock, she served as the president of the California Association of Bilingual Education’s San José chapter. She dedicated her life’s work to promoting educational equality for English language learners.

Juan C. Garcia, PhD

Juan Castañon García, ’82 MS Clinical Psychology, was a member of San José State’s Student Initiative and the Mexican American Student Confederation. Inspired by his Mexican American Youth Organization (MAYO) in high school, García was a participant in the 1968 Chicano commencement walkout, and was committed to Bay Area youth activism, recruiting Chicanos to pursue higher education. A licensed marriage and family therapist, he founded Spanish-speaking service provider groups to advocate for mental health access for Latinx communities. A professor emeritus of counseling and rehabilitation at California State University, Fresno, García co-founded the Integral Community Solutions Institute to provide counseling services to San Joaquin Valley’s underserved populations. García is a graduate of UC Santa Cruz and Stanford University.

Malaquias Montoya

UC Davis Professor Emeritus Malaquias Montoya is regarded as one of the founders of the social serigraphy movement in the San Francisco Bay Area in the mid-1960s. He has taught at Stanford, UC Berkeley, the California College of the Arts, the University of Notre Dame and the University of Texas, San Antonio. Montoya’s art depicts the resistance and strength of humanity in the face of injustice, and the necessity to unite behind that struggle. He co-founded Taller Arte del Nuevo Amanecer, a rural community-based art center. In 2011, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center published Voice for the Voiceless, a monograph about Montoya’s work. Montoya’s artwork will be on display during the Symposium.

Connie Moralez

Connie Moralez was admitted to San José State in fall 1967, one of two students selected by Buchser High School as part of a targeted recruitment of Hispanic students. The daughter of farmworkers with grade school educations, Moralez was the first family member to receive a college education, completing her bachelor’s degree in political science at Arizona State University. Inspired by the Chicano movement, Moralez focused on making a positive difference in the lives of struggling individuals, particularly Hispanics. Her professional career has encompassed community service, work within community-based organizations and educational institutions. Moralez developed and implemented a mentorship program for East Side Youth Center, and supported EOP students at Mission College.

Tony Quintero, JD

Tony Quintero, ’68 Sociology, walked out in protest in the 1968 Chicano Commencement. As a law student at UC Berkeley, he founded El Centro Legal de la Raza and served as president of La Raza National Law Students Association. As CEO of American Regional Malls, LLC, and chairman of Plaza Investments, LLC, Quintero acquired and managed malls, and developed a program that benefited the changing demographics of Latino and African-American communities. He served as director of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, vice chairman of the New America Alliance and co-chair of the Democratic National Committee’s Hispanic Leadership Council. His rich and varied career includes acting in three television series, three feature films, and producing six film projects.

1:15 p.m.

Break

1:30 p.m.

Panel 3

“Gains Achieved/Challenges Ahead: Revitalizing the Mission of Chicano Commencement”

Moderator

Julia Curry, PhD

Julia Curry is associate professor of Chicano and Chicana Studies at San Jose State. Since 2009, she has worked with the Chicano/Latino Faculty and Staff Association to provide scholarships for undocumented students. She advocated institutionalizing services, support and resources for immigrant students, leading to the development of SJSU’s UndocuSpartan Resource Center in 2018. Curry serves as faculty advisor to Student Advocates for Higher Education, an undocumented student support group, and the Chicano/a/x Graduate Council. She coordinates with the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies to address legal challenges, such as the Supreme Court Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)/Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) case, and organizes symposia covering policies related to in-state tuition and the California Dream Act.

Panelists

Elma Arredondo, MA

Elma Arredondo, ’79 Psychology, is an analyst programmer at San José State, where she helped develop a student data warehouse service. Arredondo, who minored in Mexican American studies as a student,­ was trained as a programmer at IBM before becoming an information specialist at SJSU, initially working in the Educational Opportunity Program’s data management, information and technical services. She serves on the executive board of the Chicano/Latino Faculty and Staff Association, where she works on the Ernesto Galarza Scholarship committee. An active member of Alum Rock Urban Village Advocates, Arredondo advises the Academics, Leaders, Mentors Aiming for Success (ALMAS) and Chicano Commencement student organizations. Arredondo is involved in her East San Jose community, currently with Alum Rock Urban Village Advocates.

Alfonzo Espinoza, MSW

Alfonzo Castro Espinoza, ’69 Graphic Design, ’73 MSW, was the first Chicano Educational Opportunity Program director appointed by San José State’s President Robert Clark. Espinoza organized EOP to provide services to incoming Chicano students, including tutoring, counseling, financial aid and recruitment. He taught at San José State, UC Santa Cruz and Monterey Peninsula College before becoming a bilingual teacher in the Pajaro Unified School District. Elected president of San José State’s Chicano Student Club, Student Initiative, in 1967, he participated in the first Chicano Commencement in 1968. Espinoza is honored to have served the Chicano community throughout his career in higher education and to have worked with many Chicano students to advocate for social, cultural, political and economic change.

Stella M. Flores, EdD

Stella M. Flores is associate dean for faculty development and diversity and

associate professor of higher education at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education

and Human Development at New York University. She also serves as director of access

and equity at the Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy at NYU. Her research examines the effects of state and federal policies on college access and completion outcomes for low-income and underrepresented populations. Flores has published on demographic changes in U.S. and was awarded the 2019 Harvard Graduate School of Education Alumni Council Award for Outstanding Contribution to Education. Recognized as one of the top 200 scholars in Education Week’s RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings, her research has been funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Reynaldo Macias, PhD

Reynaldo F. Macías is a professor of Chicana/o studies, education and socio-linguistics, and an affiliated faculty member with the African American studies and civic engagement departments at UCLA. The founding chair of UCLA’s César E. Chávez Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies, he served as the assistant director of the National Institute of Education and was appointed to the advisory board for the National Institute for Literacy by President Clinton in 1996, where he served until 2003. The co-founder of Aztlán—International Journal of Chicano Studies Research and the National Association of Chicano Social Science, Macías specializes in the politics of language policy, language demography and educational socio-linguistics, including literacy, and bilingual and multicultural curricular education.

Refugio I. Rochin, PhD

Refugio I. Rochin is UC Davis professor emeritus Chicana and Chicano studies and agricultural economics. He served on UC Santa Cruz’s Graduate Group for Education at UC Davis and lecturer in Latin America and Latino studies. The first permanent director of the Julian Samora Research Institute at Michigan State University, Rochin was also founding director of the Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives. A board member of CEMELA and the American Society of Hispanic Economists, he received the inaugural Achievement Award of the American Society of Hispanic Economists in 2008. He is recognized for his path-breaking Latino/a studies scholarship and research on new technology adoption as part of Nobel Laureate Norman Borlaug’s “Green Revolution Team.”

2:45 p.m.

Closing and reception

 

SJSU Cares Housing and Homeless Resources Explained

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’18 Photojournalism/ San Jose State University

Media Contacts:
Christine Hutchins, 408-924-1141, 650-644-9329, christine.hutchins@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, 408-799-3373, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SJSU Cares Housing and Homeless Resources Explained

100 Percent of SJSU Students Who Requested Housing and Homeless Resources and Remained Engaged with SJSU Cares Received Assistance

SAN JOSE, CA–Housing insecurity is a nationwide crisis affecting too many college students. A complex issue that is often interconnected with other concerns, including economic hardship, it can range from short-term to ongoing need.

To add to this complex issue, “housing insecurity” can be described as a spectrum. Housing insecurity could mean a student sleeps on her friend’s couch before the semester starts, a family that has been displaced by a landlord selling its property, or a person with longer-term needs related to job loss, divorce or separation, illness, addiction or mental health issues.

At San Jose State University, SJSU Cares was established as a resource and service to assist students who are confronted with situations and issues outside of the classroom that may negatively impact their academic success. Some of those services include housing/homeless resources, food insecurity, mentoring, counseling, health and wellness, and public safety assistance. There is a range of housing/homeless resources, including temporary emergency housing, financial assistance for housing, assistance with landlord issues and help to search for an apartment.

Not every student who is in need of temporary emergency housing wants or seeks on-campus living assistance. Temporary emergency housing assistance is not approached as a “one size fits all” service model. Every student matters and each student has unique housing needs. SJSU Cares begins services by assessing each student’s unique needs to understand the best approach toward sustainable housing and a comprehensive solution—rather than providing just “a bed.” It’s important to note that not all students facing housing insecurity utilize SJSU Cares. Many seek other resources outside of the university.

During the 2018-19 academic year, SJSU Cares received requests for various types of assistance from 189 students. Forty-four percent of the 189 SJSU Cares requests were for housing/homeless resources.

In each of these cases, SJSU Cares responses were aligned with the unique needs of students, as there is no single, uniform response to housing assistance needs. In cases when a student has revealed historical and ongoing financial hardships that affect their housing needs, SJSU Cares has provided solutions that involve more comprehensive interventions. The goal is to ensure students gain the necessary skills and resources to develop financial self-sufficiency and resilience.

By the Numbers

Among the actual services provided to the 189 students who contacted SJSU Cares during the 2018-19 academic year:

  • 53 students were granted additional financial aid grants through SJSU Cares with an average award amount of $1,107.
  • 21 students were awarded financial aid loans through SJSU Cares and 12 students accepted an average loan amount of $3,329.
  • 18 students were granted emergency assistance funds with an average award amount of $789.
  • 6 students received temporary emergency housing on campus with an average stay of 17.8 days.

In spring 2019, President Papazian stated that any student who is in need of temporary housing will not be turned away.

However, not every student who contacted SJSU Cares accepted services or resources. SJSU Cares strives for housing stability based on each student’s unique needs and their personal decision to utilize the services or resources offered. While SJSU Cares delivered temporary housing to some students based on immediate, short-term needs, they worked with other students to arrange loans or grants in an effort to facilitate long-term financial and housing stability.

Going Forward

As SJSU comes to understand the emergent challenges of student housing insecurity, the university is continually scaling its services and housing resources and is working to deliver those services as quickly as possible. The university also is expanding promotion of SJSU Cares so students are aware of it.

Anyone affiliated with SJSU who recognizes that a student is experiencing housing insecurity or other forms of economic crisis is encouraged to contact SJSU Cares directly by email at economiccrisis@sjsu.edu or by filling out the Request for Assistance online form. The SJSU Cares team is committed to taking a comprehensive approach to resolving students’ economic crises while building their financial efficacy and resilience.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 145 areas of study with an additional 108 concentrations — offered through its eight colleges.

With approximately 36,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

SJSU Hosts Inaugural Parent and Family Weekend Oct. 4-6

SJSU is hosting Parent and Family Weekend Oct. 4-6. Photo by David Schmitz

SJSU is hosting Parent and Family Weekend Oct. 4-6.
Photo by David Schmitz

San Jose State University is hosting its inaugural Parent and Family Weekend Oct. 4-6. Parents and families are invited to show their Spartan Spirit at a football game, attend a mini lecture series, learn how to help their students succeed at SJSU and enjoy plenty of time with their students.

To learn or to register, visit: go.sjsu.edu/PFW19

Schedule of events

Friday, October 4
5 to 7 p.m.: Show your Spartan pride at the Parent and Family Tailgate on South Campus and participate in the Brew & Vine Tailgate
Includes meal ticket for Smoking Pig BBQ and vegetarian options, SJSU themed tasting cup, tailgating game area, and pre-game Spartan walk with the players
7 p.m.: SJSU Football vs. New Mexico

Saturday, October 5
9 a.m.: Continental Breakfast
10 a.m.: Welcome event with members of the Administration and Parent/Family Member of the Year Award presentation

Be a student for the day
11:15 a.m.: Learn from World Class Faculty – Mini Lecture Series (11:15am)
Noon: Explore Student Success – Frosh/Sophomore and Junior/Senior Workshops
12:30 p.m.: Have lunch at the Student Union and visit the Interactive Student Org Fair on the 7th Street Plaza to learn more about how your student can get involved at SJSU
2:30 p.m.: Go bowling at the Bowling Center in the Student Union (2:30pm) or
Tour the new Student Recreation and Aquatic Center
4-6 p.m.: Enjoy an evening under the stars and attend a reception at the Hammer Theater

Sunday, October 6
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Join us for Brunch downtown at Rookies patio and mingle with fellow SJSU parents, families, students and alumni!

For questions about Parent and Family Weekend, please call 408-924-5972 or email mystudentis@sjsu.edu.

SJSU IT Offers Tips on How to Be Secure Online

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.

San Jose State University’s IT Division is working to raise awareness of how students, faculty and staff can be more secure online during National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. As part of the Academic Alliance with the Department of Homeland Security, the university will be sharing tips on cybersecurity that encourage internet users to “Stop.Think.Connect.”

On Oct 1 and 2, IT will host a Cybersecurity Awareness booth outside Clark Hall between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Students, faculty and staff are invited to take a phishing quiz and pick up “fun fact” snacks. The emphasis will be on ways to stay secure while adopting the latest security software, web browsers, and operating systems, to spot phishing, safe online browsing and password protection through multi-factor authentication.

The national awareness campaign this year is focused on three steps internet users should take before logging on.

Stop:

Before you use the internet, take time to understand the risks and learn how to spot potential problems.

Think:

Take a moment to be certain the path ahead is clear. Watch for warning signs and consider how your actions online could impact your safety—or your family.

Connect:

Enjoy the Internet with greater confidence, knowing you’ve taken the right steps to safeguard yourself and your computer.

 

Alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos To Be Inducted into U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Hall of Fame

John Carlos and Tommie Smith at the Olympic Statues on the San Jose State University campus during the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. (Photo: Josie Lepe/San Jose State University)

San Jose, CA – Fifty-one years after San Jose State University alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos were removed from the 1968 Olympic games in Mexico City, the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC) is awarding Smith and Carlos their highest honor. On November 1, 2019, the Olympic sprinters will be inducted into the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Hall of Fame.

“The U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame represents the pinnacle of competitive excellence in our nation, and its inspiring members are champions who have transcended sport through the legacy they leave both on and off the field of play,” said USOPC CEO Sarah Hirshland. “It’s an honor to welcome the class of 2019 into this prestigious and celebrated honor roll. We thank them for their impact on sport and society, and for continuing to inspire the next generation of athletes and fans.”

Tommie Smith, ‘69 Social Science, ‘05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, ‘05 Honorary Doctorate, were SJSU track and field team members when they qualified to compete in the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. After earning gold and bronze medals, respectively, they bowed their heads and raised gloved fists on the medal stand while the national anthem was playing. In doing so, they created an iconic moment in athlete activism

“It is never too late to do what is right—especially regarding those who have sacrificed so much for so long—not to benefit themselves, but in defense of human rights. Congratulations Tommie and John—two extraordinary athletes and human rights advocates who will be remembered and treasured as heroes as long as the Olympic Games shall exist. Never has induction into this prestigious Hall Of Fame been more deserved,” stated Harry Edwards, ’64 Sociology, ’16 Honorary Doctorate, and Kenneth Noel, ’66 BA, ’68 MA, Sociology, co-founders of SJSU’s Olympic Project for Human Rights.

Smith and Carlos become the second and third San Jose State athletes inducted into the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame. They join fellow Spartan teammate and two-time Olympic gold medal winner Lee Evans, ‘70 Physical Education, who was inducted in 1989.

“I cannot say enough about the sacrifices John and Tommie have made and the rich tradition of student activism they both represent for our university,” said Mary A. Papazian, president of San Jose State. “More than 50 years after Mexico City, they are still working to improve people’s lives. We are very proud that John and Tommie got their starts as San Jose State Spartans, and I am delighted to see them honored by the USOPC for the work they did and continue to do on behalf of others.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 145 areas of study with an additional 108 concentrations — offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 36,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

CommUniverCity SJSU Selected as a 2019 Outstanding Leader in Experiential Education

SJSU students and faculty surveyed residents about mobility in the city at Viva CalleSJ.

SJSU students and faculty surveyed residents about mobility in the city at Viva CalleSJ.

CommUniverCity SJSU has been selected by the National Society for Experiential Education (NSEE) to receive the 2019 Outstanding Leader in Experiential Education: Community-Based Organization award. The program will be recognized at NSEE’s annual conference Sept. 24th in St. Pete Beach, Florida.

“It’s so gratifying for CommUniverCity SJSU to be recognized at the national level for the rich hands-on learning opportunities we provide more than 1,600 undergraduate and graduate students every year,” said Katherine Cushing, executive director of CommUniverCity SJSU and professor of Environmental Studies. “Every day, we strive to show our students how they can apply what they are learning in class to ‘move the needle’ on important social issues that matter to our neighbors.”

Cushing traveled to Florida to receive the award at the conference.

The program brings together city representatives, community partners and residents as well as SJSU faculty, students and staff to provide engaging service-learning opportunities for students to connect and contribute to the local community surrounding SJSU. Last year the program oversaw 42 experiential learning projects and is celebrating its 15th anniversary this fall. CommUniverCity SJSU focuses its work in three main areas: Engage, which focuses on improving community health, Learn, which promotes a college-going culture and Build, which enhances neighborhood infrastructure.

One such “learn” project is Engineering in Action, led by Michael Oye, a project supervisor and associate director of CommUniverCity SJSU.

SJSU students work on lesson plans for the Engineering in Action project.

SJSU students work on lesson plans for the Engineering in Action project.

“The Engineering in Action project allows our SJSU students to gain a valuable experiential education opportunity by explaining technical subject matter to non-technical people, a practice that many of our students will have to master in their careers wherever they work,” said Oye, who is also a lecturer in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering in the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering. “At the same time, students gain a broader perspective of the engineering profession in society, and children from the community have a chance to interact with role models.”

An example of an ongoing “engage” project is Growing Sustainability, where SJSU students focus on engaging school-aged children with hands-on activities designed to teach the importance of healthy living and environmental stewardship. The program includes garden education during school hours, an after school garden club and gardening workshops.

“I have always been passionate about environmental education and outdoor opportunities for underserved populations, but managing the Growing Sustainably program has opened my eyes to the impacts of hands-on experiential education on attitude and behavior change among participants, as well as the importance of place-based education,” said Alexandra Dahl, a graduate student in environmental studies and project coordinator of Growing Sustainability. “SJSU undergraduate student interns teaching the garden and cooking workshops are able to take what they learn in their college courses and apply them in real-world settings.”

One of the key tenets of the CommUniverCity SJSU is that projects are based on community-identified needs in the city. This is especially true for “build” projects. This year, SJSU students in sociology, political science and urban planning administered more than 1,500 mobility surveys to participants at Viva CalleSJ, an open streets event attracting more than 100,000 residents. The students analyzed the data and presented findings to City of San Jose staff members.

NSEE recognized CommUniverCity SJSU for its leadership in implementing education projects designed to meet community needs, engagement with the City of San Jose and local civic organizations to develop economic opportunities in underserved communities, as well as its advocacy for experiential education projects for students from diverse backgrounds.

By the Numbers (2004-2019):

115,556 residents engaged

21,130 SJSU students participated in projects

394,382 volunteer hours

$8.38 million (estimated value to the community)