Move-In Day 2019

Watch a video of new and returning students moving into San Jose State University residence halls on Aug. 16, 2019. More than 4,200 students moved into the residence halls last week.

 

Stan and Marilyn Gadway Commit $1 Million  to SJSU Athletics

Stan Gadway, ’64 Civil Engineering, and his wife Marilyn Gadway, ’60 Recreation, have announced a $1million gift to the Spartan AthleticsCenter and plans to create an endowment to support the Scott Gadway Academic Center, which they established in 2003.

Stan Gadway, ’64 Civil Engineering, and his wife Marilyn Gadway, ’60 Recreation, have announced a $1million gift to the Spartan AthleticsCenter and plans to create an endowment to support the Scott Gadway Academic Center, which they established in 2003. Photo: Terrell Lloyd

Media contacts:
Lawrence Fan, SJSU Athletics media relations director, 408-924-1217, lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu Robin McElhatton, SJSU media relations specialist, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

 San Jose, Calif. —San Jose State University is pleased to announce that it has received a $1 million gift through a charitable trust to support the Spartan Athletics Center, which will be the new home of Spartan football and women’s and men’s soccer. Stan Gadway, ’64 Civil Engineering, and his wife Marilyn Gadway, ’60 Recreation, also plan to create an endowment to support the Scott Gadway Academic Center, which they established in 2003.

 Marilyn and Stan Gadway have a history of supporting San Jose State that spans more than 60 years,” said Marie Tuite, SJSU director of intercollegiate athletics. “They are keenly committed to the academic mission of SJSU. Nothing thrills them more than to see an athlete or any student graduate from their beloved alma mater. ‘Thank you’ hardly seems enough to express my gratitude for this gracious gift. Their first date was an SJSU football game, where they sat on the east side of CEFCU Stadium (formerly Spartan Stadium) and cheered loudly for the Spartans. They’ve been cheering ever since.”

These gifts will benefit student-athletes on the football, and men’s and women’s soccer teams. The Spartan Athletics Center will provide new locker rooms, an auditorium, coaches’ offices, position-specific classrooms, stadium game day suites, and a state-of-the-art athletic training room that will be accessible to all student-athletes.

“The Gadways have been incredibly committed to SJSU Athletics over the years,” said SJSU Football Head Coach Brent Brennan. “Their investment years ago in the Gadway Academic Center has been a terrific resource for all of our student-athletes. This new commitment will have an incredible impact on our football program, Spartan soccer and the entire athletics department. We are grateful for their continued support.” 

The Gadway Legacy

Stan and Marilyn Gadway’s first date was a San Jose State football game against the University of Hawaii in 1958. Originally from Nebraska, Stan came to San Jose State on the G.I. Bill after four years of military service. Marilyn’s own path to college was supported in part by a $100 scholarship given by a businesswomen’s club in Barstow, Calif., where she graduated high school. She never forgot the gesture, which validated her desire to pursue an education. Together the Gadways raised two sons, Dean, ’89 English, Multi-Subject Teaching Credential, and Scott, ’92 Aviation, while Stan ran Gadway Construction, Inc. and Marilyn managed their investment properties.

Longtime supporters of Spartan football, the Gadways established a charitable remainder trust with the goal of supporting SJSU Athletics with the remainder proceeds. When Scott died in a 1996 skydiving accident, Marilyn and Stan recognized his memory by creating the Scott Gadway Academic Center to support the academic achievements of student-athletes.

 “We funded the academic center because our main interest is not wins or losses in sports, but in educating kids,” said Stan. “Over the years we have been thanked by hundreds of coaches and student-athletes for the academic support provided by the center. We see the Spartan Athletics Center as an expansion of that vision. By investing in athletics we can help bring in needed funds for scholarships. The education we received at San Jose State changed our lives tremendously, to the point where we are now able to pay back to the college what it did for us. The students’ diplomas are what will make their lives successful.” 

It is important to the Gadways that Scott’s memory live on in the Academic Center, which is why they are establishing an endowment. They also serve as ambassadors to the women’s gymnastics team, rooting for them at home and away meets. For the Gadways, athletics is a gateway to an education.

 “We have seen a lot of young kids come through SJSU Athletics,” said Marilyn. “The most important thing they can get is that college degree. Athletics is a good avenue for many to get an education.”

 “This gift from Stan and Marilyn Gadway is a magnificent example of private support of San José that makes an enormous difference in the University and our athletics program,” said  Interim Vice President of University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation Peter Smits. “The Spartan Athletics Center is an important part of the future success of Spartan Athletics, and we are grateful for the Gadways’ generosity and thoughtfulness.”

To track fundraising progress and learn how you can support Spartan Athletics, please contact Josh Thiel, deputy athletics director for athletics advancement, at 408-924-1697 or joshua.thiel@sjsu.edu.


 About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study offered through its nine colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is proud of the accomplishments of its more than 270,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

About San Jose State Athletics

 San Jose State sponsors 22 NCAA Division I intercollegiate sports programs for 500+ student-athletes annually. Spartan football is a member of Division I’s Football Bowl Subdivision, the NCAA’s highest level of competition.

 The Spartans’ primary conference affiliation is with the Mountain West. Selected teams belong to the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation, the Western Athletic Conference and the Golden Coast Conference.

 San Jose State has 10 NCAA team championships and 52 NCAA individual titles. Sixty-two Spartans competed in one or more Olympic Games. San Jose State athletes have won seven gold, six silver and seven bronze medals at the Olympics.

 Annually, about one-third of the student-athlete population earns either an institutional, conference or national recognition based on outstanding academic performance.

SJSU MLIS Student Receives Award from Society of American Archivists

Angela Osbourne, a master’s in Library and Information Science student, received the Harold T. Pinkett Student of Color Award from the Society of American Archivists.

Angela Osbourne said she grew up without access to a lot of books. She had access to a Bible, and it helped her learn to read and speak well. Now the master’s of Library and Information Science student in the College of Professional and Global Education is helping community members access archives in Sacramento.

“As a child I had a dream one night of collecting books and allowing anyone to come and borrow them or keep them if they would like,” she said. “And if they wanted, they could come back and add books of their own.”

Osbourne said she rushed to tell her mother the idea she had dreamed up.

“She told me it had already been invented and it was called a library,” Osbourne said. “I was excited, feeling like I knew what I was going to do with my life.”

Osbourne recently received the 2019 Harold T. Pinkett Student of Color Award at the Society of American Archivists (SAA) conference in Austin, Texas, July 31 to Aug. 6. She said she was welcomed by the Association of Research Libraries/SAA Leadership Forum coordinators and panelists as well as the Archivists and Archives of Color Section. The award included conference and travel fees, and one-year membership in SAA.

“I was blessed to be chosen to go and learn more about the archival profession there,” she said.

Established in 1993, the award recognizes and acknowledges graduate students of color who through scholastic and personal achievement, manifest an interest in becoming professional archivists and active members of the SAA. The award is named for Pinkett, who served with distinction during his long tenure at the National Archives and Records Administration as well as a Fellow with SAA.

As a volunteer with the Sacramento Central Library’s Special Collections, she helped with an annual Archive crawl. She noticed during the 2018 event that there were a lack of African American visitors during the event.

“Further investigation revealed that the African American community may not have had information on this event and how it applied to them and their legacy,” Osbourne said. “This issue, however is not isolated. Archives across our nation are now recognizing how parts of the community, namely African Americans, have been excluded and it is past time to move and work to include them.”

She took it as her personal mission to gather input on how to create a more welcoming environment and inform diverse community members about events.

“As an African American woman, I know it can be far more comfortable to walk into any event or room to see a wide variety of different hues of color reflected in the people there,” she said.

Osbourne also works to let community members know hat the archives can do for them and what they can do for the archives in return, such as saving historical records.

“As a future archivist, Osbourne is committed to preserving and providing access to the history of African Americans for African American communities,” SAA wrote in a press release. “In her studies and volunteer experiences, she has worked to become aware of the complexities that surround information needs in a modern library and has demonstrated her ability to learn and master the necessary technical skills required for an archivist and librarian.”

SJSU and Provident Credit Union Announce Partnership Agreement for Event Center

Event Center

Event Center

 

 

Media Contacts:

Robin McElhatton

Media Relations Specialist

408-924-1749

robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

Lawrence Fan

SJSU Associate
Athletics Director

408-924-1217

lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu

John Haggarty

VP marketing,
Provident Credit Union

650-508-0300, ext. 2611

jhaggarty@providentcu.org

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University and Provident Credit Union have forged an $8.1 million, 20-year partnership agreement to rename The Event Center at San Jose State University to Provident Credit Union Event Center. The California State University Board of Trustees approved the venue renaming and broader agreement at its July 24 meeting.

“Maintaining a modern, inviting event center is vital for San Jose State, our students and student-athletes, faculty and staff, the City of San Jose, and the entire campus community,” said Mary A. Papazian, president of San Jose State. “Regional collaborations like this one demonstrate how the university can work with industry in mutually-beneficial ways. And, as an SJSU alum, President Jim Ernest is another great example of our graduates who make a difference in their own backyard.”

Funds from the annual payments will be used to make improvements, upgrades, renovations and for ongoing maintenance to the Event Center, a 30-year-old facility managed by Student Union, Inc., a student auxiliary. The building is a prominent feature of the campus and is visited by students, faculty and staff members during such events as Commencement, Honors Convocation and Spartan Athletics contests. The university and greater Bay Area community visit the center regularly when it is rented by outside promoters for concerts, comedy shows and a variety of other entertainment events.

“Provident Credit Union looks forward to supporting and serving the staff, students, and alumni of San Jose State University with financial services. The credit union has had a 70-year relationship with not only educators in Northern California but all communities in the five Bay Area counties. As an alumnus, I am very proud that Provident has been given the opportunity to provide the San Jose State University community with our exceptional products, outstanding services and comprehensive financial education. We are very excited about this partnership and eager to get started,” said Jim Ernest, president and CEO of Provident Credit Union.

Ernest is a San Jose State alumnus who holds a bachelor’s in economics and an MBA from St. Mary’s College. He serves on the board of directors of Easter Seals Bay Area and is the Finance Committee chair.

The agreement includes signage at the facility and on nearby roadways; the opportunity to sponsor or participate in university events; and the opportunity to provide the campus with financial literacy awareness clinics.

San Jose State University and Provident Credit Union thank PIVOT Agency (PIVOT), a nationally- known full-service sports marketing and sponsorship agency for its support and assistance on this naming rights agreement.

About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 145 areas of study with an additional 108 concentrations — offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 32,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

About San Jose State University Athletics

San Jose State University’s athletics program sponsors 22 NCAA Division I sports (9 men’s and 13 women’s) and offers an intercollegiate athletics experience to at least 490 student-athletes annually. The Spartans compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest level of college football. San Jose State is a member of the Mountain West — a conference of 12 football-playing schools in the Pacific, Mountain and Hawaiian time zones.

About Provident Credit Union

Provident Credit Union is a full-service retail financial cooperative with over $2.7 Billion in assets, over 350 employees and 20 community branches in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Redwood Shores based credit union offers a full range of financial products and services from checking and savings accounts to credit cards and mortgage loans and has proudly served the San Francisco Bay Area since 1950. Provident has earned Bauer Financials 5 Star Sustained Superiority rating for over 20 years and has been ranked as one of the Top 200 healthiest credit unions in the country by depositaccounts.com for the past 4 consecutive years. The credit union is open to anyone who lives or works in the surrounding counties of the Bay Area. For more information about Provident please visit providentcu.org.

SJSU and Google Offer Computer Science Summer Institute Extension

SJSU students and educators celebrate on the last day of Google's Computer Science Summer Institute Extension Program. Photo by David Schmitz

SJSU students and educators celebrate on the last day of Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute Extension Program. Photo by David Schmitz

This July, 18 incoming freshmen engineering and computer science students got a head start on their studies at Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute (CSSI) Extension. The students spent two weeks learning programming fundamentals and a mix of languages such as HTML, CSS, Python, JavaScript and others, then spent a week developing their own web-based application.

On Aug. 2, representatives from Google, SJSU, family and friends gathered to watch the students’ final presentations. When the students started the program, three weeks before, most of them had no experience with programming. 

Ray Sawyer, a student development specialist at Google, said a few words before the students shared their apps.

“Our main goal is the opportunity to create and increase confidence and passion for technology,” he said, noting that Google engineers volunteered with the summer institute and the students toured the Mountain View headquarters. “I was here on Day 1 and I can see these students are sitting a little taller, smiling a little more and they are more confident. To witness this right here—that is success.”

SJSU Assistant Professor of Computer Science Nada Attar completed a course herself to learn how to teach the CSSI curriculum. Blanca Sanchez-Cruz, the assistant director for Student Support Programs in the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering and director of SJSU’s MESA Engineering program, helped to recruit students from the College of Science and the College of Engineering.

“We did not want to limit it to computer science or software engineering majors,” Sanchez-Cruz said. “Most engineering majors have to take an intro to coding course. We are seeing a need for coding across disciplines.”

Students work on their final assignments during Google's Computer Science Summer Institute Extension. Photo By David Schmitz

Students work on their final assignments during Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute Extension. Photo By David Schmitz

The students were presented with a simple prompt for their app design – create something that solves a problem. The groups came up with ideas for self-improvement, such as an app to help students make healthy choices around diet and exercise, or focused on supporting the campus community, such as an app to help students find professors and classes that match their learning styles.

“We are seeing students with social awareness and social consciousness,” said Sanchez-Cruz.

While the students presented and demonstrated their apps, a panel of judges that included Attar, Sawyer and two teaching assistants, took notes to determine three awards: outstanding presentation, innovative idea, and technical skills. Audience members also voted using a Google form to select an Audience Choice Award.

The first team to present won the Technical Skills award. The trio created a website they called SHOCK – Students Helping Our Community Kindly – that listed references for homeless residents and included a donate button. They deployed their site using Google Cloud Platform and said if they had more time, they would have made the site more interactive.

Ray Sawyer, third from the right, poses with students during the final day of Google's CSSI Extension program. Photo by David Schmitz

Ray Sawyer, third from the right, a student development specialist at Google, poses with students during the final day of the CSSI Extension program. Photo by David Schmitz

Of the teams, four students who worked on an app called “Find My Classmate” received the Outstanding Presentation Award. They created a web app that allows students to register and find other colleagues in their same major, then connect via social media apps. 

Two other students received the Innovative Idea award for creating Bimonthly Improvement. The website allows users to spend two months focused on a specific self-improvement topic such as sleep.

The duo enjoyed getting to know each other through the challenge.

“We made many errors when coding, but we had a fun time fixing them,” said Jesse Nguyen, of working with his partner Alexander Lane.

The team to win Audience Choice included three students who created an app for people to give away free items to other people in their community.

“When we were brainstorming, we had trouble balancing ideas with what’s doable,” said student Jennifer Yang. “We settled on a donating app.”

She and colleague Jared Garcia did most of the back-end coding.

“There were lots of errors and getting lost and finding the solutions,” Yang said. “That’s what software engineering is.”

Meet SJSU’s 2019 Orientation Leaders: Evelyn Ramirez

As nearly 10,000 undergraduate students prepare to begin classes in the fall, 34 orientation leaders have been busy this summer welcoming these new freshmen and transfer students, and their families, to campus. Orientation leaders show students and their families the ins and outs of campus, offer insights on how to connect with resources and share plenty of Spartan spirit at a total of 16 orientation sessions.

We are pleased to share a series that introduces some of the orientation leaders who shared their own educational goals, why they are involved as an orientation leader and their favorite Spartan memory.

Evelyn Ramirez

Evelyn Ramirez

Evelyn Ramirez

Major and expected Graduation date:

International Business, minor in Communication Studies, Fall 2019

Why did you become an orientation leader?

I decided to become an orientation leader because I wanted to be involved on campus and guide students in their transition from High School or Community College to SJSU.

What is your favorite part of orientation?

My favorite part of orientation is being able to connect with others on the team and the students and families. 

What advice would you give to incoming students?

My advice for incoming students is to get out of their comfort zones and get involved in order to take advantage of all the opportunities SJSU has to offer. 

What is your favorite SJSU experience?

My favorite experience at SJSU so far has been all meaningful connections I have made with other Spartans. 

What has been your favorite class?

My favorite class has been Strategic Management (BUS3 189) with Thomas Shirley through the Rio de Janeiro FLP.

SJSU’s Yoshihiro Uchida Honored for “Pioneering Spirit”

Yoshihiro Uchida, '47 Biological Sciences, walks to the stage with President Mary Papazian during the 2018 Faculty Service and Recognition Awards when he was honored for 70 years of service to SJSU. Photo by David Schmitz

Yoshihiro Uchida, ’47 Biological Sciences, walks to the stage with President Mary Papazian during the 2018 Faculty Service and Recognition Awards when he was honored for 70 years of service to SJSU.
Photo by David Schmitz

The Nisei Week Foundation is celebrating the 79th Annual Nisei Week Japanese Festival Aug 10-18 in Southern California. San Jose State University alumnus and long-time judo coach Yoshihiro Uchida, ’47 Biological Sciences, will be recognized as a Pioneer Spirit during the festivities on Aug. 14.

Uchida was nominated by the Orange County Nikkei Coordinating Council for his dedication to the Japanese American community and his long-time support of judo.

Yoshihiro Uchida, center, poses with members of the 1964 Olympic Judo Team.

Yoshihiro Uchida, center, poses with members of the 1964 Olympic Judo Team.

Uchida brought the sport of judo to SJSU in the 1940s when he was a chemical engineering student. He coached police students on how to use the martial art, a sport in which he had competed since he was a 10-year-old in Garden Grove, Calif.

Before completing his degree, Uchida was drafted into the U.S. military during World War II while his family members were incarcerated in internment camps in Poston and Tule Lake. The former men’s gymnasium in the then-Spartan Complex West building was used as a registration center for Santa Clara County Japanese Americans before they were sent to internment camps during World War II. The building was renamed in his honor in 1997. It was rededicated in 2014 following a renovation of the building and a plaque was placed outside the gymnasium to denote its historic significance.

When Uchida returned to campus after World War II, he re-enrolled at SJSU and graduated with a degree in biological sciences in 1947. He continued to teach judo and was instrumental in creating a judo program on campus as well as bringing the sport to national and international attention. Uchida helped to establish a weight class system for judo that allowed it to be practiced by anyone, providing a framework for the sport’s expansion throughout collegiate circles. He also worked to establish judo as a sport in the Amateur Athletic Union.

Yoshihiro Uchida stands in the judo dojo in the building named for him at SJSU.  Photo by Christina Olivas

Yoshihiro Uchida stands in the judo dojo in the building named for him at SJSU.
Photo by Christina Olivas

The first National AAU championships were hosted by San José State in 1953. Uchida was the tournament director. On an international level, he was able to qualify judo as an Olympic event and was the first Olympic judo coach for the United States, which resulted in his traveling to the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo. In 2016, he attended his 11th summer Olympics in Brazil to watch SJSU’s Marti Malloy and Colton Brown compete.

In addition, Uchida has been involved in the Japanese American community. In 1996, he founded the Japanese American Chamber of Commerce of Silicon Valley (JACCSV) and currently serves as chairman of the advisory board. He has been the chairman emeritus of the board of trustees of the Japanese American National Museum (JANM), and the chairman of the JACL advisory board. He started the San Jose Nihonmachi Corp, which worked on the Miraido Village project or Road to the Future, focused on the revitalization of the city’s Japantown.

He was inducted into the SJSU Hall of Fame in 1999 and into the SJSU “Legends Hall of Fame” in 2012, to name a few of the honors and awards bestowed on him through the years.

In 2018, Uchida was recognized at SJSU’s Faculty Service and Recognition Awards for 70 years of service to the university community. He continues to attend judo practice in Uchida Hall’s dojo.

Meet SJSU’s 2019 Orientation Leaders: Haley Tang

As nearly 10,000 undergraduate students prepare to begin classes in the fall, 34 orientation leaders have been busy this summer welcoming these new freshmen and transfer students, and their families, to campus. Orientation leaders show students and their families the ins and outs of campus, offer insights on how to connect with resources and share plenty of Spartan spirit at a total of 16 orientation sessions.

We are pleased to share a series that introduces some of the orientation leaders who shared their own educational goals, why they are involved as an orientation leader and their favorite Spartan memory.

Haley Tang

Haley Tang

Haley Tang

Major and expected Graduation date:
Advertising with a minor in Graphic Design, Spring 2020

Why did you become an orientation leader?

There were two main reasons why I wanted to become an orientation leader. The first was because I wanted to be able to have the same impact that my orientation leader had on me. I was one of the many students that was reluctant to attend SJSU. I wasn’t too optimistic going into orientation either. It wasn’t until I was able to meet my orientation leader and hear more about him when I was able to appreciate SJSU for more than the stereotypes I had heard from high school. This also ties into my second reason, in that I wanted to be able to share my story in order to encourage students that might have the same feelings about SJSU, showing them that there’s a place for them.

What is your favorite part of orientation?

My favorite part about orientation is when I’m able to see the students be themselves not only around me but also each other. Each student is different and responds to certain activities and personality types differently. It warms my heart when I’m able to joke around with the students and have the nervous energy disappear. One way that usually helps break the ice is through our Spartan to Spartan time. I love being able to collaborate with the other orientation leaders (specifically Jeanne Trang and Jeffrey Tran) in order for our students to hear multiple perspectives about SJSU. Genuine conversations lead to genuine connections. Being able to talk about how my negatives turned into positives seems to help open the door for students to share their insecurities and anxieties about college life. 

What advice would you give to incoming students?

Take every moment day by day. Don’t compare your experience based on everyone else’s. These four to five years fly by so fast so make the most of it. Make those initially awkward conversations with your classmates. Join that club even if your friends don’t want to do it with you. Apply for that job even if you don’t think you’re qualified. Fail hard and fail fast but trust the process we call college. You never know what life has in store for you.

What is your favorite SJSU experience?

My favorite experience at SJSU has been being apart of the New Student and Families Program. As cheesy as it sounds, I’ve found a support group like no other through this program. Not only have I grown as a leader but also as a person. This program has given me a new appreciation and a new purpose as an SJSU student. I wouldn’t trade this experience or these memories for the world.

What has been your favorite class?

My favorite class at SJSU has been my MCOM 100W. A lot of students don’t think too highly of their Area Z course, but I loved the open dialogue Professor Dowdy would provide. I was able to write in styles and formats that related to my major. Not being the strongest writer made me feel inadequate to take the class. Over the course of the semester, I saw my writing improve and my confidence in writing grow.

Meet SJSU’s 2019 Orientation Leaders: CeeJay Fangonilo

As nearly 10,000 undergraduate students prepare to begin classes in the fall, 34 orientation leaders have been busy this summer welcoming these new freshmen and transfer students, and their families, to campus. Orientation leaders show students and their families the ins and outs of campus, offer insights on how to connect with resources and share plenty of Spartan spirit at a total of 16 orientation sessions.

We are pleased to share a series that introduces some of the orientation leaders who shared their own educational goals, why they are involved as an orientation leader and their favorite Spartan memory.

CeeJay Fangonilo

CeeJay Fangonilo

CeeJay Fangonilo
Major and expected Graduation date:
Business Administration with a concentration in marketing, Fall 2019

Why did you become an orientation leader?
I decided to become an orientation leader here at SJSU ever since I volunteered to be one at my community college. I wanted to inspire students to really grasp their vision and goals of who they envision themselves to be within their first semester or first year at this institution and what goals they want to accomplish by then. I want to help them feel less anxious about their first day of school, I want them to be more prepared, to encourage them to utilize all their resources offered by SJSU, and to not be afraid of failures and challenges that come along the way in their first year of college. Impacting at least one student in any way during my sessions, will be the thing I’ll be most grateful for in my heart.

What is your favorite part of orientation?
My favorite part of orientation is when I’m able to break through to my students and have them open up more and be more comfortable around me because I feel that once I make that connection with them, they ask me more questions about SJSU, campus life, my own college journey, and so much more. In this way, I know that they’re enjoying their first interaction/experience here at SJSU to make their transition to college easier.

What advice would you give to incoming students?
My number one piece of advice I would offer to incoming students is to get involved on campus in any way, shape, or form. It’s important to do more than just go to class, study, do your homework, and go home. You’ll start to really find SJSU to be your home away from home once you get yourself involved on campus because that’s how you get to really connect and network with other students at your institution. When you’re ready and comfortable, get out of your comfort zone, do something new, and discover something new about yourself! Another important advice is to never forget about your mental health! It’s just as important because if you’re not in the right headspace, things can get difficult and if you ever find yourself in a tough situation, we have resources students can take advantage of in the Wellness Center. Don’t ever invalidate your feelings and just know you’re never alone although that might seem hard to remember when you’re caught up in the moment. 

What is your favorite SJSU experience?
My favorite experience at SJSU so far has to be meeting the people I’ve met through the orientation program, through Greek life, and through the clubs I decided to get myself involved in because they really made my time here at SJSU special and worthwhile. SJSU wasn’t my first choice at all but since I decided to get myself involved, I’ve fallen in love with this institution and I don’t regret my choice of coming here. I’ve grown so much in the short time I was here at SJSU and I’m glad that this orientation program played a really big part in that. Without this opportunity to interact with thousands of students who come from different walks of life with such diverse backgrounds for two summers even with my diverse group of teammates I work with and leading the new orientation leaders my second year, I wouldn’t be the person I’ve become without this program. Much love and support to my orientation family! You’ll always have a special place in my heart.

What has been your favorite class?
My favorite class I’ve taken here at SJSU was probably my social media marketing class (a marketing elective) because it really geared my curiosity to really learn about this topic in the business realm and it made me realize that I want to have my future job involved within social media marketing. My professor even went as far as getting our whole class certified with the Hootsuite program that is a very useful tool in marketing and I’m thankful for that because that puts me one up from others when I apply for jobs and it shows how professors like her really care about their students and their future, wanting them to succeed in life.

Other thoughts on SJSU?
I would also like to add that It’s never too late to get involved! As a transfer here at SJSU, I know we feel older and feel a little bit out of place. Just remember that this is your college experience, so don’t let anything or anyone else’s opinion hold you back from going after what you want! You’re only an undergraduate once, so do all you can, but remember to balance it all out.

Meet SJSU’s 2019 Orientation Leaders: Jeanne Trang

As nearly 10,000 undergraduate students prepare to begin classes in the fall, 34 orientation leaders have been busy this summer welcoming these new freshmen and transfer students, and their families, to campus. Orientation leaders show students and their families the ins and outs of campus, offer insights on how to connect with resources and share plenty of Spartan spirit at a total of 16 orientation sessions.

We are pleased to share a series that introduces some of the orientation leaders who shared their own educational goals, why they are involved as an orientation leader and their favorite Spartan memory.

Jeanne Trang

Jeanne Trang

Jeanne Trang

Major and expected Graduation date: 

Social Science in Prep for Teaching, Spring 2020

Why did you become an orientation leader?

During my own orientation in Summer 2017, my orientation leader — Natalya B., allowed me to feel at ease and excited for my first year here at SJSU. Which in turn inspired me to apply and become an orientation leader myself. I was a bit nervous in the beginning because I wasn’t sure if I was ready for this role. But knowing how big of an impact I can have on the incoming students motivated me to apply because I wanted to provide that same experience for them!

What is your favorite part of orientation?

My favorite part about orientation is the different connections that I have built with my students and the knowledge I now have about my campus because it truly helped me realize the number of amazing resources and support my campus has to offer — which has to lead me to fall in love with this school and program even more! 

What advice would you give to incoming students?

Think of yourself as a rubber band. You can only be stretched so far before you snap. So prioritize yourself and your mental health. But also don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone and try something you normally wouldn’t try. Take college as a platform for test trials and errors. Because you for sure would rather live a life filled with “Oh” rather than “What ifs”!

What is your favorite SJSU experience?

My favorite experience so far at SJSU would be the number of opportunities I have been able to experience. Whether it is getting involved within orientation, Associated Students, or even other clubs and organizations — I strongly feel like it has allowed me to become a better individual as well as a leader and student. 

What has been your favorite class?

My favorite class that I have taken so far would be the UNVS 199 course. This class is definitely a highlight for me because it allowed me to self explore my leadership style as well as providing me skills that I can use for other experiences. It is definitely something that is hard to explain and something you need to experience yourself. 

SJSU Braven Program Shows Promising Results

Braven, a career accelerator, launched a pilot program at San Jose State University in 2014 with 17 students. In its 2018-19 Impact Report released on July 23, Braven founder and CEO Aimee Eubanks Davis shared that the program has served 1,600 underrepresented college students to date at three universities. Early data is showing promising outcomes for participants.

“Given our initial promising results, we are projected to grow dramatically to serve 5,000 new Fellows over the next three years at our three current university partners,” wrote Aimee Eubanks Davis, founder and CEO, in an email announcing the release of the report.

Braven Fellows join a cohort of other students who enroll in a one-semester course in which they engage with coaches, followed up with one-on-one mentoring, networking opportunities and career fluency experiences. Through the program, students connect with a leadership coach from a tech firm or business who meets with them in person to discuss career development. SJSU has partnered with coaches from LinkedIn, Google, Facebook and Teach for America, among other employers.

“The most valuable part of the Braven experience is the organized tools that are given to help us succeed with our assignments and apply to the real world,” said Dylan Dutt,’18 Electrical Engineering and a 2016 Braven Fellow.

Dutt is working as a sales engineering for Johnson Controls.

The career accelerator program launched a pilot at San Jose State University in 2014, and expanded to two other universities since then, including National Louis University and Rutgers University-Newark. Of the 300 Braven Fellows who graduated in 2016-2018, 69 percent had landed a strong full-time job or enrolled in graduate school within six months of graduation.

This compares to the national average of 54 percent and 46 percent for black and Latinx students from public universities.

Other notable results include:

  • 48% of Bravengraduates are already out-earning their parents’ combined income from when they were growing up;
  • 48% of Bravengraduates have received a promotion since entering the workforce; and
  • 75% report that they are able to put away savings with their current income, which is a significant improvement over the national average: 41% of millennials (age 25-34) report having $0 saved in their savings account.

Braven will follow the career paths of the 370 Braven Fellows who graduated with the class of 2019. The program has plans to expand to serving 5,000 new fellows over the next three years.

“Braven helps you become a better you,” said Antoinette Martin, a 2016 Braven Fellow who plans to complete her bachelor’s in computer engineering in 2020. “In a matter of weeks, I gained the insight of Silicon Valley’s most successful leaders, obtained a solid foundation of my aspirations and made lifelong connections.”

Meet SJSU’s 2019 Orientation Leaders: Miranda Morrison

As nearly 10,000 undergraduate students prepare to begin classes in the fall, 34 orientation leaders have been busy this summer welcoming these new freshmen and transfer students, and their families, to campus. Orientation leaders show students and their families the ins and outs of campus, offer insights on how to connect with resources and share plenty of Spartan spirit at a total of 16 orientation sessions.

We are pleased to share a series that introduces some of the orientation leaders who shared their own educational goals, why they are involved as an orientation leader and their favorite Spartan memory.

Miranda Morrison

Miranda Morrison

Miranda Morison

Major and expected Graduation date: 

International Business, Spring 2021

Why did you become an orientation leader?

Because my Orientation Leader made me fall in love with SJSU and I want to do the same for incoming Spartans!

What is your favorite part of orientation?

I love connecting with my students and staff and making San Jose State and welcoming and exciting as possible. 

What advice would you give to incoming students?

To be comfortable with being uncomfortable, to put themselves out there and get involved!

What is your favorite SJSU experience?

Being an Orientation Leader has BY FAR been my favorite experience at SJSU. I’m excited to study abroad in the fall too!

What has been your favorite class?

My favorite classes were Global Sport and Theater Appreciation and my favorite event was Fire on the Fountain. 

Other thoughts on SJSU?

I want new students to believe that this campus belongs to them just as much as it does to everyone else!

Meet SJSU’s 2019 Orientation Leaders: Oners Martinez

As nearly 10,000 undergraduate students prepare to begin classes in the fall, 34 orientation leaders have been busy this summer welcoming these new freshmen and transfer students, and their families, to campus. Orientation leaders show students and their families the ins and outs of campus, offer insights on how to connect with resources and share plenty of Spartan spirit at a total of 16 orientation sessions.

We are pleased to share a series that introduces some of the orientation leaders who shared their own educational goals, why they are involved as an orientation leader and their favorite Spartan memory.

Oners Silva

Oners Silva

Oners Silva Martinez

Major and expected Graduation date: 

Sociology, Spring 2021

Why did you become an orientation leader?

I decided to become an Orientation Leader because I wanted to change lives for the better. I wanted to give students a better Orientation experience than what I went through. Coming in as a new student on campus, I know what it feels like being lost and not having the guidance that is needed to be successful as a student.

What is your favorite part of orientation?

My favorite part of orientation is when we meet the students in our small groups. Seeing how students develop from the morning to the end of orientation is always rewarding to see.

What advice would you give to incoming students?

The advice I would give to incoming students is to step out of their comfort zone, be your authentic self and always stay uncomfortable. On the academic side, students should always meet with their academic advisors every semester at least once.

What is your favorite SJSU experience?

My favorite experience at SJSU has been making it onto the Dean’s List for my academic achievements.

What has been your favorite class?

My favorite class so far has been Nutrition Science 144 where I learned about our current food system and the barriers that exist for people to get certain foods in the world.

Other thoughts on SJSU?

San Jose State chose you for a reason, so make the best out of this experience. Never be afraid to ask for help.

Meet SJSU’s 2019 Orientation Leaders: Tyrah Nicole Hicks

As nearly 10,000 undergraduate students prepare to begin classes in the fall, 34 orientation leaders have been busy this summer welcoming these new freshmen and transfer students, and their families, to campus. Orientation leaders show students and their families the ins and outs of campus, offer insights on how to connect with resources and share plenty of Spartan spirit at a total of 16 orientation sessions.

We are pleased to share a series that introduces some of the orientation leaders who shared their own educational goals, why they are involved as an orientation leader and their favorite Spartan memory.

Tyrah Hicks

Tyrah Hicks

Tyrah Nicole Hicks

Major and expected Graduation date: 

Business Marketing Major, Spring 2021

Why did you become an orientation leader?

I decided to become an orientation leader because I wanted to broaden my horizons at SJSU, and get more involved on campus while being a good resource for all the incoming students I get to meet.

What is your favorite part of orientation? 

My favorite part is seeing the impact I made on the students! Having them ask me questions and feel comfortable. I also like to see myself grow throughout the months as well.

What advice would you give to incoming students?

It is okay to make mistakes. It is a part of growing up. When those mistakes do arise, remember to always rise above them and things will always go on.

What is your favorite SJSU experience?

My favorite experience every year at SJSU is Homecoming Week! Our event Fire on the Fountain is such a cool experience that I love having with my friends. 

What has been your favorite class?

My favorite class so far would probably be Intro to Business (BUS 010) because it went over all the different aspects of business and had us go out and do hands on experience with our future jobs!

Other thoughts on SJSU?

SJSU is definitely a force to be reckoned with! I’m glad I chose this college because I could not see myself going anywhere else.

SJSU Global: Spartans Support Refugees in Greece

San Jose State University and I-House alumna Momoko Iwagami works with children at the Happy Caravan school in Thermopylae, where she teaches refugee children.

San Jose State University and I-House alumna Momoko Iwagami works with children at the Happy Caravan school in Thermopylae, Greece, where she teaches refugee children.

San Jose State University is dedicated to providing access to relevant educational programs that allow individuals to gain knowledge and skills that create a solid foundation for them to be engaged and productive members of a global society while also allowing opportunities for faculty to engage in research, scholarship and creative activities with global impacts. In a series called “SJSU Global,” we will be sharing stories of how our students, faculty and staff engage around the world and how people from around the world engage with SJSU.

In 2012, three students met at San Jose State University’s Phyllis Forward Simpkins International House. One was a business major from Japan, one from England studied film, and the other from France graduated with a master’s degree in physics. Little did they know back then, but their paths would converge this summer at schools for refugees in Greece.

Coincidentally 13 current SJSU students were in Greece this summer doing journalism fieldwork on the refugee crisis, as part of a study-abroad program with Professor Diane Guerrazzi.

These Spartans, converged this June in the land of Sparta, near Athens, through the long-distance efforts of Leann Cherkasky Makhini, director of the SJSU International House.

The students visited Happy Caravan, a school in Thermopylae, serving 200 refugee children who arrived from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and Iran. The focus is on education, art and creativity, cinema and sports activities. I-House alumna Momoko Iwagami who worked there as a
volunteer will start this fall as executive director of the organization, while I-House alumna Marie Hobdon is in charge of a campus in Malakasa.

“You see a huge shift in the children,” Hobson said. “I’ve been here almost six months…the children are tall and healthy. It’s amazing.”

The visit was one of many stops along the three-week trip in which the SJSU students explored questions of how refugees are impacting the economy in these countries, as well as what migrants face when they arrive.  The students interviewed refugees, local residents, business owners, government officials and aid workers.

Journalism student Cindy Cuellar produced a photo essay, and Gabriel Mungaray created a news video about the school. Mungaray noted that more than a million refugees flooded into Greece in 2015-16, before the Balkan border closed in 2016. Refugees continue to pour into Greece where they are kept in overcrowded camps, awaiting approval of asylum applications.

The school is run by a Dutch nonprofit. Iwagami is considering registering the school as a nonprofit in the United States. She and Hobson are also looking for interns and donors from the United States. The interns would learn about Happy Caravan, and they may help develop a financial model that is more sustainable than single donations.

“I hope that coming to Happy Caravan will do many things, but first I hope it is a catalyst for people to leave with their eyes less clouded,” Hobson said. “That they see something they haven’t seen before.”

The third alumni connection includes “Magic Tony,” from France, who completed a master’s in physics while living in SJSU’s I-House. Tony, who asked not to use his last name, has been traveling the world performing for underprivileged children with a company called Magic Brothers World. He thrilled the refugee children with his act at the Malakasa location while Professor Guerrazzi was visiting, proving once again that Spartan spirit knows no boundaries.

Read more stories produced by SJSU Journalism and Mass Communications on their SJSU Italy & Greece WordPress Blog.

Did you travel on a faculty-led program this summer or are you an international student arriving at #SJSU this fall? Share your #SJSUGlobal experience! Email your stories and photos to: communiations@sjsu.edu.

Message Regarding Gilroy Garlic Festival Shooting

Editor’s Note: This message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff July 29, 2019, at 9:30 a.m.

Dear campus community,

The San Jose State community and I once again are filled with heartache and mourning as we share in the pain, sadness and outrage of another horrific tragedy that has hit so close to home for many of us. Yesterday’s senseless mass shooting at the beloved annual garlic festival in Gilroy shattered a family community cornerstone tradition that has been celebrated for over 41 years.

I know the entire SJSU community shares my grief and sorrow since many of our own faculty, staff, students and alumni are personally connected in one way or another to our neighboring community of Gilroy — less than 35 miles from campus. We pause to reflect and mourn with family members and friends of those who were lost and injured.

Some of our students, faculty and staff members may experience a variety of difficult emotions, including grief, fear, anxiety and even depression. Some members also may experience a heightened awareness about safety. Please remember that SJSU offers a wide range of services to students and employees who need support, including counseling and psychological services. Support is also available to SJSU staff and employees through our Employee Assistance Program.

The well-being and safety of all of our students, faculty, and staff members are important priorities. Although we have no indication of any threats, as a reminder, if you witness or receive threats to safety, please contact University Police at 408-924-2222 or dial 911.

As we pause and process the unavoidable questions of why and how this tragedy took place, I ask that you join me in coming together to console our families and friends of Gilroy. We stand with them to condemn this random act of hatred and violence and offer them our support in whatever way we can.

Sincerely,
Dr. Mary A. Papazian
President

SJ Earthquakes Award Scholarship to Mt. Pleasant Grad

Azusena Reyes shows her excitement after receiving the San Jose Earthquakes East Side Promise Scholarship during freshman orientation at San Jose State University on Tuesday, July 16, 2019. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

Azusena Reyes shows her excitement after receiving the San Jose Earthquakes East Side Promise Scholarship during freshman orientation at San Jose State University on Tuesday, July 16, 2019. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

At San Jose State University’s frosh orientation on July 16, Azusena Reyes said her heart started beating faster when the words San Jose Earthquakes Spartan East Side Promise Scholarship flashed across the screen during the welcome session.

“When I heard my name called, I was so shocked,” said the Mt. Pleasant High School graduate who will be attending SJSU in the fall. “The first thing I wanted to do was tell my mom and dad I won. It is more for them –to tell them I made it and that my accomplishments are because of my parents.”

Azusena Reyes, photographed with her parents (on the right), is presented the East Side Promise Scholarship by San Jose Earthquakes representatives during freshman orientation at San Jose State University on Tuesday, July 16, 2019. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

Azusena Reyes, photographed with her parents (on the right), is presented the East Side Promise Scholarship by San Jose Earthquakes representatives during freshman orientation at San Jose State University on Tuesday, July 16, 2019. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

Her parents were in on the surprise and had been notified a couple of weeks before by SJSU’s Financial Aid Office. They kept quiet, and Reyes experienced excitement and lots of emotions when her name was called.

“Having the opportunity to attend SJSU on a full scholarship for the first year is an amazing gift, to say the least,” she said. “I promise to use this opportunity in a profound way and pay tribute to those involved with the scholarship by committing myself to maintaining a high GPA while making a difference within the SJSU community.”

She learned about the Earthquakes scholarship, from Amanda Aldama, SJSU admissions counselor/recruiter-Spartan East Side Promise (SESP) coordinator. Through a variety of interactive workshops, events, and programming, SESP provides a pathway to admission at SJSU, and strives to prepare students and their families for the college academic expectations, by connecting students to campus resources prior to the start of their freshman year. The SESP also offers guaranteed admission to eligible students who graduate from a high school in the district. Through this partnership, the San Jose Earthquakes Spartan East Side Promise Scholarship provides one student admitted through the SESP special admissions program with funding for their first year of tuition and on-campus housing.

Reyes said her parents both immigrated to the San Jose area from Oaxaca, Mexico. She was born in east San Jose and watched her parents work hard to provide new opportunities for her and her brother. Her mother didn’t speak English but learned so she could get a job as a paraeducator and become a U.S. citizen. Her father worked two jobs as a landscaper.

“They came from one of the poorest states in Mexico and established a home and careers,” Reyes said. “I saw the endurance it took them. They inspired me to develop leadership and learn from their hardships.”

Reyes, who is an avid San Jose Earthquake fan, said she had visited the SJSU campus since she entered high school on field trips with her Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) club.

“The campus feels like a community and there is a lot of diversity,” she said. “There are so many students from different walks of life.”

She noted the sculptures and murals on campus that celebrate human rights activists, such as Cesar Chavez.

Reyes plans to be a software engineering major and first got interested in the field when she attended a Girls Who Code program her junior year. She spent six weeks at Facebook headquarters learning about computer science.

“I am interested in helping to close the gender gap in technology,” she said.”

This summer, she is getting a head start on her studies as part of Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute (CSSI) program at San Jose State University. The students selected for the three-week challenge are part of SJSU’s Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) program.

“I’m learning a lot of material, including python and java,” she said. “For the last week we will visit Google to help us with our final project. This program teaches and improves our coding skills as well as networking.”

From International Student to Outstanding Grad, Alumna Lands Job at PwC

Qurat Syeda

Qurat Syeda

Qurat Syeda, ’19 Accounting, moved solo to the United States to study business four years ago. This spring, she was named one of SJSU’s Outstanding Graduating Seniors for her strong academic record, her spirit of service to supporting other students and leadership.

“I have always been passionate about learning,” she said. “But I wanted to do more than just learn about the world from books. I wanted to experience it. So I made the bold decision to move out to the U.S. on my own for my undergraduate degree, the first in my family to do so.”

Syeda was born in Pakistan, but was raised in Riyadh, Saudi Arabi.

“I grew up in a blend of two cultures, but they both share a strong sense of hospitality and warmth for their guests,” she said. “As a traveler, you will always be greeted with the utmost love and respect…receiving people with kindness and generosity has always been part of my upbringing.”

When she first arrived at SJSU, she had supportive faculty who checked in on her regularly before and after class to see how she was doing.

“My biggest support was from my supervisors at Peer Connections,” she said. “They were instrumental in both my personal and professional growth at SJSU and if I hadn’t found them or my job as a Peer Educator, I don’t know how I would have made it through college.”

Syeda celebrated her stellar academic record last month at the Lucas College and Graduate School of Business commencement ceremony. She maintained a stellar of a 4.0 grade point average 4.0 grade point average while tutoring and mentoring more than 500 students as peer educator with SJSU Peer Connections and the Jack Holland Student Success Center

“Qurat is not only focusing on her academics, but trying to help others as well,” said Michael Williams, an accounting lecturer. “She is competitive and wants to be the best, but not at the expense of other people.”

She counts among her top achievements receiving the Financial Women of San Francisco scholarship award in 2018.

“I was among four undergraduate female students from the greater Bay Area chosen for this academic and personal achievement,” she said. “As one of the oldest and largest women-only organizations in the Valley, it was an honor to be interviewed and to speak to a crowd of powerful and amazing women from all over the area and to be shown tremendous support and encouragement for the goals that I have chosen to pursue and the personal hurdles that I have overcome.”

A member of Lucas College and Graduate School of Business’ Sbona Honors program, Syeda also earned second place at the 2016 PwC Case Competition and the 2016 ISACA Research Case Competition.

While she is looking forward to winding down a bit after four rigorous years of studying and working toward her degree, she will be starting a full-time position with one of the big four accounting firms, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). She is also planning to study for CPA licensure soon.

SJSU and Education Design Labs Expand Digital Skills Badge Program

Don Fraser, Jr., left, Education Designer, Director of Micro-Credentialing, of Education Design Lab,  gave a presentation to SJSU faculty, and members of Cisco Systems and Enterprise Holdings on the campus of San Jose State University on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018. San Jose State University in partnership with Education Design Labs, Cisco and Enterprise Holdings during a focus group in fall 2018. ( Josie Lepe/San Jose State University )

Don Fraser, Jr., left, Education Designer, Director of Micro-Credentialing, of Education Design Lab, gave a presentation to SJSU faculty, and members of Cisco Systems and Enterprise Holdings on the campus of San Jose State University on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018. San Jose State University in partnership with Education Design Labs, Cisco and Enterprise Holdings during a focus group in fall 2018. ( Josie Lepe/San Jose State University )

San Jose State University will continue its 21st Century Skills Badge pilot program this fall in partnership with Education Design Labs. Education Design Labs is a nonprofit focused on designing, implementing and scaling new learning models for higher education and the future of work. The nonprofit received a grant from Lumina Foundation to expand its micro-credential program in three U.S regions through partnerships with universities and employers.

The Education Design Lab first connected with SJSU’s Career Center leaders and educators in fall 2018. Through focus groups with faculty, students and employers, they begin designing a digital skills badge program that would benefit students and potential employers. The pilot program launched in spring 2019, with two partner employers who offered to virtually review resumes of potential candidates, Cisco Systems and Enterprise Holdings.

“New, AI-driven recruiting methods enable employers to assess fit for roles based on disaggregated bundles of skills rather than college majors alone,” said Catherine Voss Plaxton, SJSU Career Center director, in advance of the pilot roll-out. “In other words, the sociology student may be a perfect fit for a user-experience position if they can provide evidence they have right mix of skills.  The process of earning a 21st Century Skills Badge can be a strong way to shift student understanding of those skills from the abstract to the specific behaviors valued in workplaces.”

Meg Virick, interim associate dean of Undergraduate Programs in the Lucas College and Graduate School of Business, attended a focus group last fall with other colleagues to provide input into designing the pilot.

“Preparing students for the workforce has always been a high priority for us, and the focus group held Dec. 10 exemplified that effort – bringing together representatives from industry, academia and the non-profit world around the table,” she said.

SJSU started the pilot with three badge options–oral communication, collaboration and creative problem solving. During the pilot semester, 54 students registered and participated in the program. The grant will allow SJSU to expand the pilot program over the next two years with a goal of expanding participation to 1,000 students with five to seven employer partners.

Senior students participate in the digital badges workshop on the campus of San Jose State University on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018. San Jose State University in partnership with Education Design Labs, Cisco and Enterprise Holdings. Program testing how digital skills badges in combination with an excellent academic experience can help graduates become more employable.( Josie Lepe/San Jose State University )

Senior students participate in the digital badges workshop on the campus of San Jose State University on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018. San Jose State University in partnership with Education Design Labs, Cisco and Enterprise Holdings. Program testing how digital skills badges in combination with an excellent academic experience can help graduates become more employable.( Josie Lepe/San Jose State University )

“Today’s employers are desperate for applicants with the right combination of technical and mobility skills. In most cases, it’s not that employers don’t have enough applicants. More often, they lack a clear signal of hard-to-measure skills that lead to long-term employee retention and success,” said Kathleen deLaski, founder and president of the Lab. “This work is about creating a two-way dialogue that empowers students to display these hard-earned skills in a format that’s easily recognizable to employers.”

Holly Zanville, strategy director for the future of learning & work at Lumina Foundation sees the promise of this approach: “By working with employers and institutions together, we’re gaining valuable new insights into how micro-credentials can boost the hiring prospects of underserved learners.”

The new initiative, called BadgedToHire, builds on the Lab’s pioneering Tee Up the Skills campaign, which pairs employers with colleges and universities to design micro-credentials that assess and validate 21st century skills aligned with local hiring demand. Over the next two years, the Lab will work with three institutions and their employer partners to study the awareness and acceptance of digital credentials as a signal for 21st century skills and improve hiring outcomes among historically underrepresented learners who receive the badges.

“The crucial skills that matter in the long run for our employees — resilience, critical-thinking, problem-solving — are ironically the most difficult for us to detect because they never show up in a resume or a transcript,” said Casey Porter, Talent Acquisition Manager for Enterprise Holdings, which participated in the first phase of Tee Up the Skills as one of San Jose State University’s employer partners. “Using badging and credentialing to certify these critical skills immediately communicates to hiring managers when an applicant has gone above and beyond to build skills we need and value.”

GCAA National Academic Honor For Spartans

The Golf Coaches Association of America honored SJSU's Mens Golf team for its academic achievements in 2018-19.

The Golf Coaches Association of America honored SJSU’s Mens Golf team for its academic achievements in 2018-19.

The San Jose State University men’s golf team was one of 120 NCAA Division I programs honored for team academic performance for the 2018-19 academic year by the Golf Coaches Association of America.

To qualify for a GCAA team academic award, the student-athletes on the team’s official roster must have a team grade-point average of 3.00 or higher.

“I’m very proud of my men. I’ve been very proud of them all year. They’ve worked hard and realized the value of being the best at everything. This was a big step for several of them to see the connection of being good at everything compared to being good in what you want,” said San Jose State University men’s golf coach John Kennaday.

“Congratulations to our men’s golf team for earning this national academic honor from the Golf Coaches Association of America. The 2018-19 academic year was a wonderful year for San Jose State men’s golf. We had our Western Intercollegiate tournament nationally-televised by Golf Channel and our team qualified for NCAA Regional Championship play.  We capped off our year with this team academic achievement and I want to thank Coach Kennaday for an outstanding year,” said Marie Tuite, the Spartans director of athletics.

San Jose State was the only California State University (CSU) system Division I program and one of six Mountain West schools named as a 2018-19 GCAA Outstanding Team Academic Award winner.