President Papazian Delivers First Formal Speech to SJSU Community

Media Contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – President Mary Papazian introduced herself to the SJSU community, reflected on the university’s legacy, and shared her optimism about its future at the Fall Welcome Address, held noon Aug. 25 in the Student Union Ballroom.

This was President Papazian’s first formal speech to the campus community since taking office July 1. Academic Senate Chair Michael Kimbarow opened the event and welcome attendees. The speech is an annual tradition marking the start of the academic year.

All students, faculty, staff, community members and the news media were invited to attend. The event was streamed live.

Read the president’s prepared remarks.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San José State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 145 areas of study with an additional 108 concentrations – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 31,200 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San José State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

“Essence of Blackness” Event Educates, Entertains and Builds Community

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Brian Andres & the Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel perform at the second annual Essence of Blackness event (Photo: Lauren Hernandez, ’15 Journalism).

The pounding of conga drums married with the seductive blare of the trumpet filled the Student Union Ballroom as part of the second  annual Essence of Blackness event.

The African AmericanStudent Success Task Force hosted the event along with its Harambee Committee to explore just one influence of African culture on the world by focusing on jazz music and its rich, diverse history in the United States and beyond.

“Harambee, the arm of the task force that sponsors these kinds of events, brings together not only the African American students, faculty and staff but also reaches out to the larger campus to participate in cultural events,” said Michelle Randle, director of the CASA Student Success Center and chair of Harambee. “And [also it is important] for the African American students to see the support that they actually have on campus beyond themselves.”

The Essence of Blackness theme was born last year following conversations with African American students regarding the type of programming they felt was necessary to share with the campus community, with an educational component being at the forefront.

Photo: Lauren Hernandez, ’15 Journalism

Charlie Channel of the Charlie Channel Quartet strums on his bass during a traditional jazz performance at the second annual Essence of Blackness event (Photo: Lauren Hernandez, ’15 Journalism).

“I do think young people now are not exposed to jazz and do not always understand that its origins do come from Africa and this country,” Randle said.

Charlie Channel of the Charlie Channel Quartet, one of two types of jazz represented that night, lectured attendees on the history of jazz before delving into a traditional jazz performance.

Channel read Langston Hughes’ poem titled “Drums,” which represents the origin of jazz by chronicling the movement of slaves from Africa while describing the survival and re-emergence of the drums into new lands.

“When you think about slavery and tribes of people who were thrown together, who didn’t know each other, the oppression, the brutality, there was just one thing they had in common — it was the drum,” Channel said. “Ultimately, it resulted in this new form of music that had never been heard before on the planet called ‘jazz.’”

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A server from Sandi’s Cobbler Cups serves American soul food at the second annual Essence of Blackness event (Photo: Lauren Hernandez, ’15 Journalism).

The genre’s diversity was introduced to attendees by Brian Andres, the drum set and leader of the Brian Andres & the Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel. He discussed how the music evolved in the United States with the help of Mario Bauza, a Cuban clarinetist who played a role in launching the Afro-Cuban jazz movement during the Harlem Renaissance.

While some attendees leapt to their feet and danced as Andres and his band’s upbeat conga drumming and lively trumpeting reverberated throughout the ballroom, others merely indulged in Walia Ethiopian, Caribbean and American soul-food cuisine.

As part of the Harambee Awards, a first in the program’s history, commemorative clocks were given to individuals in the campus community who have served and shown commitment toward the success of African American students.

Six members of administration, four students and two community members were awarded recognition and two students were given special recognition for their “Strength in the Face of Adversity.”

“It means something if it comes from the community out to people to say ‘hey we recognize what you do, and we want to publicly be able to acknowledge your contributions because I don’t think people do it for the recognition,” Randle said. “They do it because they love what they do, they want to see the students succeed, and they want to be a part of a community that supports everybody.”

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Commemorative clocks were given to individuals in the campus community who have served and shown commitment toward the success of African American students (Photo: Lauren Hernandez, ’15 Journalism).

Gary Daniels, Harambee awardee, said although he is thankful for the recognition, he is not a student activist to gain accolades.

“Young people should use their talents and energy to make the world a better place regardless of whether they get awarded or recognized,” Daniels said.

Jerusalem Bekele, ’17 Kinesiology and fellow Harambee awardee, said events like Essence of Blackness are essential to not only educating the campus community about various cultures and the origin of traditions, but also to building a sense of community.

“Our perspective is kind of limited to what’s in front of us, and not necessarily outside so events like this kind of reach outside of America,” Bekele said. “I think it introduces a lot of culture and tradition to the SJSU community as well.”

Donntay Moore-Thomas, ’17 Communications, said although it was nice to see familiar faces that comprise the three percent African American population at SJSU, she was thrilled to see people from other cultural backgrounds attend as well.

“If we can share a meal together, I feel that we can come together for a greater cause,” Moore-Thomas said.

San Jose State Receives $15 Million Gift Commitment from South Bay Philanthropist Lupe Diaz Compean

Media contact: Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

The Student Union will be named the Ramiro Compean and Lupe Diaz Compean Student Union, pending approval by the California State University Board of Trustees (Photo: Muhamed Causevic).

The Student Union will be named the Ramiro Compean and Lupe Diaz Compean Student Union, pending approval by the California State University Board of Trustees (Photo: Muhamed Causevic, ’15 BFA Graphic Design).

SAN JOSE, CA–San Jose State is pleased to announce that it has received a $15 million gift commitment from South Bay resident and friend of the university Lupe Diaz Compean. The gift will support student success initiatives and scholarships. In addition, the gift will support the maintenance of SJSU’s newly renovated and expanded Student Union, and the many activities housed in this structure located in the heart of campus.

“Lupe Diaz Compean’s remarkable generosity will enable San Jose State to make meaningful, sustained investments in student success initiatives, scholarships and student programming,” Interim President Susan Martin said. “Mrs. Compean did not graduate from college, but she and her late husband recognized the value of a college education for all and exemplified that a fulfilling life is within reach of everyone who works hard to achieve their dreams. San Jose State is pleased to recognize and honor the extraordinary work and generosity of donors who are making an enduring impact on our university and community.”

The building will be named the Ramiro Compean and Lupe Diaz Compean Student Union in honor of Mrs. Compean and her late husband, pending approval by the California State University Board of Trustees at its March 8-9 meeting in Long Beach, Calif. President Martin and Vice President for University Advancement Paul Lanning will represent SJSU at the meeting.

“San Jose State has been in conversation with the Compeans for the past two decades,” said Vice President for University Advancement Paul Lanning. “Throughout this time, Lupe Diaz Compean has been crystal clear that her motivation in making the gift was to benefit students, honor her family and her late husband by naming a facility, and demonstrating that by working hard and getting an education, anyone can achieve what she has in her lifetime.”

Endowments

Photo: David Schmitz

Student Union interior (Photo: David Schmitz).

The gift will be used to create the following endowment funds:

  • A Student Success Fund to support initiatives that foster student success and increase retention and graduation rates.
  • Three scholarship endowments to support emancipated foster youths, California Dream Act students, and a merit scholarship for high-performing students.
  • A Student Union Programming Fund to provide support for visiting lectures, art exhibits, workshops and other student-focused special events and programming.
  • A Student Union Operating Fund that will provide resources for ongoing maintenance and operating needs of the facility.

Lupe Diaz Compean

Photo courtesy of Lupe Diaz Compean

Photo courtesy of Lupe Diaz Compean

Lupe Diaz was born in 1926 in Edinburg, Texas and was the oldest in a family of 10 children. In 1955, she married Ramiro Compean, who was born in Reynosa, Mexico, in 1932. He was one of seven children in his family. Mr. Compean passed away in August 2002.

In 1956, one year after they were married, the Compeans moved to San Jose. Mr. Compean worked for George Day Construction building houses in Saratoga. Mrs. Compean attended school and helped her husband in the business. They saved their money and soon were able to purchase a home in Almaden Valley. They continued to buy properties as they were able. Mrs. Compean, at age 89, is still actively managing the properties she owns.

Mrs. Compean is not a graduate of SJSU, but believes very strongly in the mission of the institution and the importance of education. She first approached SJSU regarding making a gift in the mid-1990s. She and her husband had heard that SJSU had a good Mexican American Studies Department and wanted to contribute. Eventually, those conversations turned to the possibility of including the university in their estate. Following Mr. Compean’s death in 2002, Mrs. Compean continued the conversation with University Advancement and indicated that SJSU would be a beneficiary of half her estate.

In 2012, Mrs. Compean and her certified public accountant, Anne Lee of Bauerle, Lee and Associates, LLP, approached the university to explore how Mrs. Compean might experience the impact of her legacy while she was still alive. Over the course of the next three years, discussions continued regarding the use of the gift and how the gift would be structured. In December 2015, Mrs. Compean finalized the gift agreement.


About San José State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San José State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 145 areas of study with an additional 108 concentrations – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 32,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San José State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

Civil Rights Icon Ruby Bridges to Receive Steinbeck Award

SJSU Media Relations Contact:
Pat Harris, pat.harris@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1748

Ruby Bridges

Ruby Bridges today (photo courtesy of Ms. Bridges).

SAN JOSE, CA – Civil rights icon Ruby Bridges, the first black child to attend an all-white elementary school in Louisiana, will be on campus Feb. 24 to receive the John Steinbeck Award.

“An Evening with Ruby Bridges” is slated for 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 7 p.m.) in the Student Union Ballroom. The award presentation will culminate an evening featuring an onstage interview of Bridges by KQED’s Joshua Johnson. This event is sold out.

Ruby Bridges has been called the youngest foot soldier of the civil rights movement. In 1960, the NAACP selected a six-year-old girl to break the color barrier of an all-white elementary school in New Orleans. White parents removed their children from classes, and angry protesters jeered at Ruby as she walked the steps of William Frantz Elementary School surrounded by federal marshals. For months, Ruby sat alone in her classroom, instructed one-on-one by Barbara Henry, a white teacher from Boston. John Steinbeck was moved by Bridges’ courage and wrote about her in his 1962 book “Travels with Charley.”

More information is available on the Martha Heasley Cox Center for Steinbeck Studies’ website.

 

Silicon Valley Business Journal: Public Use/Civic Project Finalist, SJSU Student Union Expansion

Posted Sept. 26, 2014 by the Silicon Valley Business Journal.

By Nicole Sheree Saunders, Contributor

When Ernest J. Kump Jr., a local architect known for innovative school planning, designed the student union at San Jose State University in the 1960s, it was considered forward thinking for the time.

Decades later, the 144,000-square-foot structure no longer served the needs of the school or the students, said Nick Seierup, design director for the Los Angeles office of the architectural firm Perkins + Will. “As schools have evolved, the ways in which students interact has also evolved,” Seierup said.

Read the full story. 

Spring 2014 Begins

Ask me anything sign

Have a question? Look for “Ask Me” stations on campus where volunteer faculty, staff and students will help you (Christina Olivas photo).

Blue skies and “Ask Me” volunteers greeted the thousands of Spartans who returned to San Jose State today for the start of spring term 2014. A special welcome goes out to more than 540 new transfer students and 640 new graduate students, joining approximately 30,000 existing students. More new Spartans are on the way. SJSU received 28,900 first-time frosh and 15,000 transfer applications for fall 2014. Don’t panic about the traffic! The admissions process typically yields around 7,000 new students each fall, replacing those who will graduate. Still, now is a great time to check out Transportation Solutions. Get your EcoPass and sign up for Bay Area Bike Share. On campus, you’ll see tons of construction underway. The good news is the Student Union west wing is nearly done. You’ll find the Spartan Bookstore there in temporary digs soon and, before long, all kinds of new eats at Union Square.

(Christina Olivas photo)

Students search for textbooks in the bookstore (Christina Olivas photo).

Speaking of books, it’s time to get to work. A huge shout out goes to the more than 12,000 students who have devoted 197,000 service learning hours over the past eight years to CommUniverCity San Jose. Recently honored as San Jose’s greatest civic gift, CommUniverCity helps students gain real-life experience addressing neighborhood issues near campus. In Long Beach, California State University Chancellor Tim White is preparing to deliver the first State of the CSU Address, which will be live streamed 11 a.m. Jan. 29. The chancellor will share his vision for the 23-campus system, including top policy priorities for 2014-15 to advance student achievement and degree completion. What about tuition? The governor’s proposed budget calls for no tuition increases while stabilizing state funding for the CSU. That means extra change in your pocket. You’ll find lots going on at the Event Center. Coming soon are Spartan men’s basketball Jan. 29 (free admission for students with ID) and Winter White featuring Steve Aoki Jan. 30. Of course spring term’s biggest events come at the very end: Honors Convocation April 25 and Commencement May 24. Good luck, Spartans!

SJSU Campus

10 Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

SJSU Campus

Soon to be at your service: a new student health center, an expanded Student Union and an updated SPX (Christina Olivas photo).

1. You’re in good company. This fall, we’re expecting 31,300 enrolled students, including 3,700 first-time freshmen, 3,700 new transfers, 2,000 new graduate students and 2,000 new and returning international students.

2. Our faculty members are the finest, including 26 new tenure-track instructors across the disciplines, from design to psychology to cybersecurity.

3. We’re building 21st century spaces. Phase 1 of the Student Union is near completion. Mojo Burger anyone? Coming soon: A new Student Health and Counseling Center and an updated Spartan Complex.

4. We power Silicon Valley. Check out these Spartans at Work and visit the SJSU Career Center to start your job search.

5. We are making it easier to get classes when you need them, offering online courses for credit from other CSU campuses.

6. We’re helping and caring. Need a hand? Just ask students, faculty and staff wearing an “Ask Me” button.

7. With more than 400 clubs, we offer something for everyone. Learn more at Fall Welcome Days, including the Student Organization Fair Aug. 28 on Tower Lawn.

8. We’re going green. Check out the EcoPass, bike share and car share programs.

9. We can dance!

10. We’re connected on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest, plus we offer safety updates via text messages through Alert SJSU.

ABC7: Simulator Shows Dangers of Texting While Driving

Posted by ABC7 on Jan. 25, 2013.

SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) — Police say young drivers are among the most likely to text while driving. It’s habit they’re trying to break. So they went to a South Bay college campus Friday with a novel approach.

Over 200 police agencies around the state, including San Jose, are mounting a big crackdown this year on texting and talking on mobile phones while driving. And they’re using a video game-like simulator to prove how dangerous it is.

Sometimes it takes technology to demonstrate how dangerous technology can be. San Jose State University junior Ryan Harper got into a simulator to learn a lesson about texting while driving, something he readily admits he does.

“It’s basically been the grace of god that I haven’t been in an accident while driving and texting,” Harper said.

AT&T is spending millions of dollars to drive home the message that it can wait if you get a text message on the road. And as adept as Harper is, he got into a crash.

When asked if the outcome from the simulator will change his thinking and behavior, Harper answered, “For sure. I don’t have a car out here in San Jose, but yes, when I go home, I will not be texting and driving.” And when asked if he was just saying that or if he’s a changed man, he answered, “I promise, I’m a changed man.”

San Jose police were also on hand to let students know they’re planning 42 enforcement events this year to nab distracted drivers, whether they’re texting or talking on a mobile phone.

They issued 123 citations last year. Most of the 3,500 crashes in 2012 involved distracted drivers.

“I think it’s difficult for people to break the habit because we get more and more comfortable with the technology that we have, and we have this sense of confidence that we can just text a quick response to something or make a quick phone call to get information,” said San Jose police traffic enforcement Sgt. Jim Hagen.

As part of its safety campaign, AT&T has an app that intercepts text messages when you’re driving, sending a reply that you’ll text back when it’s safe to do so.

And sometimes it takes a real life story — which AT&T has turned into public service announcements — to underscore that texting is two-way process. Texting someone who is driving can have fatal consequences.

In the public service announcement a woman says, “Having a Highway Patrol officer write in a report that a text message sent at 12:05 is the reason that she is dead is not something that will ever go away.”

Texting a simple “LOL” or “yeah” might take only a few seconds. But San Jose police point out that looking down for five seconds at 55 miles an hour means you’re driving blind for the length of a football field.

(Copyright ©2013 KGO-TV/DT. All Rights Reserved.)
Fall 2013 Frosh and Transfer Applications Surge

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

Fantastic weather greeted new students at the Fall Welcome Days Kick-Off Aug. 21 on Tower Lawn. A folklorico group was among the entertainers at the event (Christina Olivas photo).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

What’s the roar coming from downtown San Jose? That’s the sound of 30,500 Spartans heading to campus for fall 2012!

As usual, the academic year began with fantastic weather. During the sunny but cool afternoon of Aug. 21, new students crowded Tower Lawn for the Fall Welcome Days Kick-Off.

The event was SJSU’s way of welcoming 3,445 first-time freshmen, 3,370 new community college transfers and 1,900 new graduate students to campus, very close to matching last year’s grand total.

With music booming, students ate ice cream, lined up for caricatures and took a ride down giant inflatable slides while meeting new people and learning about SJSU organizations and departments.

The next day, thousands of Spartans flooded campus for the first day of classes, searching for parking and perhaps hoping to drop/add a course or two.

New Services

The most obvious change was tremendous progress on the construction of the new Student Union. When students left for the summer, there was little more than a foundation.

Now you can see the curvy exterior of the western expansion near the Music Building and a tiered theater taking shape near the Business Tower.

The Spartan Bookstore was crowded with students, who can now charge up to $900 in books and supplies on their Tower Cards. Meanwhile, the University Library is making it easier than ever to borrow textbooks.

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

Over at South Campus, Spartan Football has been practicing since late summer for its season opener at Stanford 7 p.m. Aug. 31, led by starting quarterback David Fales and supported by the SJSU Cheer Team (Christina Olivas photo).

Even before stepping on campus, everyone experienced downtown San Jose’s newest traffic features: 7.6 miles of buffered bicycle lanes on Third, Fourth, 10th and 11th streets.

Yes, it’s confusing but the city of San Jose is offering more info on how to navigate the bike lanes, intended to make things safer for everyone.

Another option is to live on campus. Almost 3,600 students have moved in, including all freshmen required to bunk in the bricks, Joe West Hall or Campus Village.

Over at South Campus, Spartan Football has been practicing since late summer for its season opener at Stanford 7 p.m. Aug. 31, led by starting quarterback David Fales.

Of course what matters most is what students find in the classroom — expect change! Among SJSU’s key hires over the summer was Dr. Catheryn Cheal.

The new associate vice president and senior academic technology officer, she is charged with helping the faculty explore online teaching.

Academic Innovation

Another new face is Lisa Vollendorf, who came from CSU Long Beach to become dean of our College of Humanities and the Arts.

Among the many faculty members heading back with new books is Professor Randall Stross, author of The Launch Pad: Inside Y Combinator, Silicon Valley’s Most Exclusive School for Startups.

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

Innovation was the theme of President Mohammad Qayoumi’s Fall Welcome Address, an annual tradition held this year on Aug. 20 in Morris Dailey Auditorium (Robert Bain photo).

Innovation was a theme of President Mohammad Qayoumi’s Fall Welcome Address, an annual tradition at SJSU held Aug. 20 this year.

After taking the podium, Qayoumi wasted no time in getting right to the point — everyone’s worried about the budget. Will tuition go up? Will jobs be cut?

What can you do? Attend the next budget forum Sept. 10 and make a difference by voting in the November elections, especially on Proposition 30.

Not registered? No problem! In the next week or so, you should see voter registration booths popping up all over campus.

Associated Students will help people register in person or online at TurboVote, which makes the whole process as easy as ordering a DVD on NetFlix.

And should you have trouble finding your way around, look for the “Ask Me” booths at all the main entrances to campus, a great example of Spartans helping Spartans.

SJSU in the News: Art Majors Turn Student Union Construction Site Barrier "Into a Thing of Beauty"

Pizarro: San Jose State students give construction site an artistic look

Originally published by the San Jose Mercury News Sept. 11, 2011.

By Sal Pizarro

Students and faculty in San Jose State’s art and art history departments have collaborated to turn a potential campus eyesore into a thing of beauty.

With demolition and construction taking place over the next two years on the university’s expanded student union, blue barrier walls have been constructed around the area, an often-used thoroughfare for campus pedestrians. But the creative teams from the university — a club dubbed the Dirty Brushes — have turned the blank wood walls into a canvas for a series of student-replicated self-portraits by well-known artists such as Van Gogh, Frida Kahlo and Picasso.

There’s also an interactive component, thanks to a guided phone tour (call 408-213-4295), narrated by art department Chairman Brian Taylor, who provides some information about the project, “Better than Blue.” On the phone tour, students also give the background of many of the self-portraits.

For probably the first time, it’ll be a real shame to see construction walls come down when the project is completed in 2013.

SJSU in the News: Art Majors Turn Student Union Construction Site Barrier “Into a Thing of Beauty”

Pizarro: San Jose State students give construction site an artistic look

Originally published by the San Jose Mercury News Sept. 11, 2011.

By Sal Pizarro

Students and faculty in San Jose State’s art and art history departments have collaborated to turn a potential campus eyesore into a thing of beauty.

With demolition and construction taking place over the next two years on the university’s expanded student union, blue barrier walls have been constructed around the area, an often-used thoroughfare for campus pedestrians. But the creative teams from the university — a club dubbed the Dirty Brushes — have turned the blank wood walls into a canvas for a series of student-replicated self-portraits by well-known artists such as Van Gogh, Frida Kahlo and Picasso.

There’s also an interactive component, thanks to a guided phone tour (call 408-213-4295), narrated by art department Chairman Brian Taylor, who provides some information about the project, “Better than Blue.” On the phone tour, students also give the background of many of the self-portraits.

For probably the first time, it’ll be a real shame to see construction walls come down when the project is completed in 2013.

Aerial view of construction at the west side of the Student Union, including a tall pile driver and a big hole in the ground. Photo courtesy of MoreCampusLife.com

Developments Continue at Student Union Construction Site

Aerial view of construction at the west side of the Student Union, including a tall pile driver and a big hole in the ground. Photo courtesy of MoreCampusLife.com

A camera provides an aerial view of the west side of the Student Union construction and renovation site. Photo courtesy of MoreCampusLife.com

By Sarah Kyo, Public Affairs Assistant

Over the summer, there has been “a lot of coordination between the new and old systems” at the Student Union construction site, said Gloria Robertson, information / marketing manager of the Student Union.

Construction workers upgraded utilities, including plumbing. This resulted in the temporary closure of a pathway between the north side of the Student Union and Engineering Building during the summer. Robertson said the Student Union will provide updates if there are additional pathway closures during the fall semester.

Workers have also started preparing for the renovated building’s new foundation. There are towering pieces of construction equipment at the site called pile drivers, which drives piles into the ground for foundation support. Foundation excavation will begin shortly, Robertson said.

“We’re gonna be one building, but there will be an east side and a larger portion is on the west side,” Robertson said.

The east side, a former outdoor amphitheater across from the Art Building, will become an indoor theater and lecture hall that can seat about 300 people. Many current student services, such as Associated Students government, Cesar E. Chavez Community Action Center and the Print Shop will move to the Student Union after the renovation. New features include a convenience store and a 24-hour coffee house. The Student Union’s projected completion date is 2013.

“We’re very excited about it,” Robertson said. “We’re working hard to keep things going.”

You can follow along with the progress of the Student Union expansion and renovation by visiting MoreCampusLife.com and its Facebook page.

Spartans pose with professional bowler Robert Smith at a bowling alley in 2009. Top row, left to right: Justin Bautista, Brian Villatuya, professional bowler Robert Smith, David Doyle and Michael Grzyb. Bottom row, left to right: Pierre Ramos and Royce Agustin. Photo courtesy of Royce Agustin.

Spartans Compete in Major Bowling Tournament

Spartans pose with professional bowler Robert Smith at a bowling alley in 2009. Top row, left to right: Justin Bautista, Brian Villatuya, professional bowler Robert Smith, David Doyle and Michael Grzyb. Bottom row, left to right: Pierre Ramos and Royce Agustin. Photo courtesy of Royce Agustin.

Five Spartans are competing in the 2011 USBC Open Championships. Top row, left to right: Justin Bautista, Brian Villatuya, professional bowler Robert Smith, David Doyle and Michael Grzyb. Bottom row, left to right: Pierre Ramos and Royce Agustin. Photo courtesy of Royce Agustin.

By Sarah Kyo, Public Affairs Assistant

A five-man Spartans team is representing SJSU at the United States Bowling Congress (USBC) Open Championships in Reno, Nev. The SJSU team’s 2011 competition dates are June 21-22.

The group consists of Royce Agustin, Justin Bautista, David Doyle, Michael Grzyb and Brian Villatuya. This is the second consecutive year that former and current members of SJSU’s bowling team are competing in this annual tournament, said Agustin, a kinesiology lecturer and SJSU alumnus.

“The thing I’m looking forward to as a team is bowling with these guys again,” Agustin said. “We know to cooperate with each other and basically get along. That’s important for team unity.”

The tournament takes place over the span of a few months. Agustin and three returning team members competed in last year’s USBC Opens Championship, which also took place in Reno at the National Bowling Stadium. With 78 lanes and 390 bowlers competing at the same time, Agustin described the stadium atmosphere as “a madhouse.”

The 108-year-old Open Championships is the largest participatory sporting event in the world, according to USBC’s website. Bowlers compete as individuals and as a team against other groups. Last year, 70,000 bowlers competed for almost $6 million in prize money, according to the 2011 event guide.

“Last year’s trip to the USBC Open Championship was a great experience for us because it was our biggest tournament since college bowling,” said Villatuya, who graduated from SJSU in 2010 with a bachelor’s of science degree in kinesiology. “It is always great to be in an environment where you compete against some of the best bowlers in the world and observe the different types of bowlers that showcase their individual style.”

Bautista has been part of the SJSU bowling team for six years as a player, president or coach. Collegiate bowling has helped prepare Bautista and his teammates because they have experience with bowling with each other.

“I have learned a lot of different things since being on the competitive team for the school and traveling and competing in tournaments representing the school,” Doyle said. “It has been a great challenge trying to break away from the regular individual goals of bowling and making the transition to trying to do whatever possible to benefit the team as a whole. It requires a different mindset and has allowed me to look at the game differently.”

Female student works on mural with pain brush in hand.

Spartans Transform Construction Site into a Work of Art

Female student (Kelsey) with paint brush working on mural of Max Beckmann.

Kelsey working on her mural of Max Beckmann. Click on the photo to see more photos on the SJSU Facebook photo album.

By Michelle Terris, Teresa Ruiz and Gale Antokal
Photos by Elena Polanco

It’s hard to miss the obtrusive blue walls erected to help close off parts of construction as SJSU prepares for a newly upgraded Student Union. While most passers-by see only painted plywood, a few creative Spartans saw a blank canvas.

With guidance and inspiration from Art and Art History Associate Professor Gale Antokal, a club on campus called The Dirty Brushes has begun painting murals of historic and contemporary artists’ self-portraits.

“This project represents a vital collaboration between Art and Art History and Visual Culture areas,” said Antokal. “It celebrates the continuity of past and present by showcasing artist self-portraits of the past five hundred years.” The faces include those of Jan Van Eyck, Michelangelo, Mary Cassatt, Pablo Picasso, Frida Kahlo and Jean-Michel Basquiat.

The group, working with permission as well as a small grant from the Student Union, is currently working on 25 to 30 portraits on the walls near the Music and Art Buildings and the Student Union. The project will ultimately extend to the walls near 7th Street.

“We felt this was a project that truly supports the Student Union’s mission to promote social, recreational, cultural and educational development at SJSU. It is also a unique opportunity to visibly showcase the artistic and creative talent of our students,” said Student Union Executive Director Cathy Busalacchi.

Other art students will also be involved in the project. Students from art history 101 classes provided the initial 50 suggested self-portrait images for the project and will develop a written catalogue for the portraits selected by the Dirty Brushes. The portrait catalogue will be used on the department and college website and in a brochure for recruiting from local high schools with Advanced Placement art programs.

Art 100W classes, a class with students from a variety of art and design majors, will develop an electronic public interface. These students plan to work with a company that facilitates guided cell phone tours for museums, universities and non-profit arts organizations throughout the country. Students, faculty, and the community will be able to stand in front of the murals and use their phones to learn more about each work.

Antokal said the mural will be in place for approximately two years, beginning mid-spring 2011, with the goal of bringing significant attention to the college’s programs. Students and the community are welcome to watch the artists work, typically on Fridays and weekends.

Learn more about the project on the SJSU Art and Design website at http://ad.sjsu.edu/whatsup/

SJSU in the News: Bigger, Better Student Union On the Way

SJSU gives student union $88M expansion

Originally published in the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal April 1, 2011

By Mary Ann Azevedo

After 42 years, San Jose State University is about to get a bigger, and better, student union. The challenge is to complete the project while class is in session.

The university kicked off an $88 million expansion last November in an effort to better meet the students’ growing needs. The university’s current 140,000-square-foot student union has long been bursting at the seams, according to Cathy Busalacchi, executive director of the Student Union Inc., a nonprofit within the SJSU system.

“This is a long time coming,” she said. “We’re trying to engage students — especially commuter students — on a more regular basis.”

In the past five years, the number of clubs on campus has climbed to 360 from 220. As the number of student groups have increased and grown larger in size, the facility’s lack of large meeting space has become more of an issue.

“We only have one room, besides the ballroom, large enough to accommodate 75 or more people,” Busalacchi said.

Daniel Benavides of O’Connor Construction Management, which is overseeing the development, said the facility’s design has taken more than two years to complete.

There have also been concerns with underground utilities.

“We’ve run into things that weren’t identified, so we will have to re-route so we can put the building where it needs to go,” he said.

Chris Van Plet, a project manager with general contractor Lathrop Construction, said there has been worry that the underground utilities will hold up the project, but it’s too early to tell if that will be the case.

The first phase of the project is focused on a new east and west wing while leaving the current space intact so as to cause minimal disruption to students.

The existing building also will receive a seismic retrofit and be brought up to meet current safety code. One of the most difficult tasks has been to figure out how to install a steel structure into the existing caste to provide adequate seismic resistance to strengthen the building, said Bob Lavey, managing principal with Perkins + Will, the project’s architect.

Once completed, the new 238,000- square-foot student union will boast numerous new features including: 10 new food concepts; a 24-hour convenience store; a much larger ballroom that can hold 600 to 650 people and can be divided into three; a 24-hour cyber café and several large meeting spaces. The old outdoor amphitheater will be converted into a modern indoor theater-style lecture hall with more than 300 seats.

New, lighter look

The new building will feature a more modern glass and steel design but still blend with the more classical aesthetics of the current facility, Lavey said.

Once the new sections are complete, focus will shift to revamping the current student union space, which will change “dramatically,” according to Busalacchi. This part of the project is slated for completion around November of 2012.

With gray cement and dark wood paneling on every floor, the current building is “not very open and light,” Busalacchi said. The dark wood banisters on every floor will be removed, and while the cement will stay, it will be power-sprayed for a fresher look.

The new facility should be eligible for LEED Silver and even possibly LEED Gold certification, Lavey said.

Student Union Inc. is funding the project from the sale of bonds held by the chancellor’s office, to be repaid through a combination of revenues generated from concerts, gym memberships, and meeting space rentals, and annual student fees paid directly to the Student Union Inc.

The expansion comes at a time when costs for materials, labor and planning are much lower compared to a few years ago.

Final completion of the building is slated for summer 2013, at which point services from across the campus, including International Extended Studies, the Women’s Resource Center and the Cesar Chavez Community Action Center, will begin moving into the new building. Most Student Union Inc. services will be limited or closed during that summer to accommodate the moving process before the facility’s official launch in the fall of 2013.

In the end, Busalacchi hopes the new Student Union will help put SJSU’s commuter reputation to rest.

“Some students may live around the Bay Area or close to campus,” she said.

The goal, Busalacchi said, is for the campus to become a place that all the students can enjoy and where they can feel comfortable.

SJSU Breaks Ground on $90 Million Student Union Project

Expansion/Renovation to Provide Unified Location for Student Organizations, Services

Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6999

SAN JOSE, Calif., — San Jose State University will hold a groundbreaking ceremony for the expansion and renovation of its Student Union building at noon Nov. 17 on El Paseo de Cesar E. Chavez (the Seventh Street Plaza). This event is free and open to the public. When completed in 2013, the 235,000-square-foot structure will span from the Seventh Street Plaza to the Ninth Street Plaza. Design and construction costs will total $90 million.

“The Student Union expansion and renovation will greatly enhance our efforts to support our students and foster a sense of community, both of which are essential for success inside and outside the classroom,” Interim President Don W. Kassing said. “This project will bring vibrancy to the university’s core, building on the tremendous impact of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library and Campus Village.”

King Library, a $177.5 million high-rise completed in 2003, and Campus Village, a $244 million residential complex completed in 2005, anchor two corners of campus. The new Student Union will centralize many student organizations and services, and feature a food court, coffee house, print shop, and computer center. An existing amphitheater will be converted into an indoor theater and lecture hall.

The project will begin with construction of a new wing on the site of the old cafeteria, and conclude with the earthquake retrofit and renovation of the existing structure, a 144,000-square-foot building completed in 1969. The architect is Perkins + Will.” The general contractor is Lathrop Construction Associates. SJSU will seek LEED Gold certification for the building.

The new Student Union will be financed with bonds, repaid with revenue from various sources including Student Union events, space rentals, and annual student fees. The project will not use funds that could otherwise be spent for academic purposes. Beginning this project during an economic downturn will mean saving money on construction costs, given the drop in demand for such services.

View the Student Union expansion and renovation website.
http://bit.ly/sjsu-morecampuslife

Download a high-resolution rendering.
http://www.sjsu.edu/features/pics/new-studentunion.jpg
San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 29,000 students and 3,190 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Student Union Groundbreaking Planned for Nov. 17

SJSU will break ground on the retrofit, renovation and expansion of its Student Union building at noon Nov. 17 on El Paseo de Cesar Chavez. This event, free and open to the public, will feature entertainment, refreshments and giveaways. Please come celebrate with us as we begin a new legacy for the Student Union and campus. Continue reading

SJSU Hosts “The Changing Face of America: A Conference on Immigration and Social Policy”

“The Changing Face of America: A Conference on Immigration and Social Policy” will be held Oct. 22 and 23 in the Student Union. The SJSU Silicon Valley Center for Global Innovation and Immigration and the College of Social Sciences will co-host the event, bringing together students, scholars and community members from various disciplines for presentations and panel discussions. Open to the public, this conference reflects San Jose State’s commitment to providing a forum for all aspects of this global issue. Continue reading