Spartans at Work: Mineta San Jose International Airport

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series ends with graduate Andres Quintero).

Mineta San Jose International Airport, located in the heart of Silicon Valley and minutes from downtown San Jose, welcomes over eight million passengers annually.

Design elements like Terminal B’s airy paseo and the parking garage’s seven-story “Hands” mural representing diversity and innovation remind visitors that SJC is more than just a travel hub.

Andres Quintero, ’06 Political Science, ’11 MA Public Administration, serves his community as vice chair of the San Jose Airport Commission, an advisory body to the San Jose City Council.

 “I’m glad I’ve been able to provide my prospective and look out for the citizens,” said this San Jose native.

Appointed for two three-year terms ending in June 2015, Quintero first got involved in politics at age 12, when he volunteered to pass out literature for a presidential campaign. He got a taste of “real” politics in 2003, when he interned for Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren in Washington, D.C.

Quintero’s role on the airport commission encompasses advising the city council on many management matters, with a focus on safety, customer service and fiscal responsibility.

 “I have found it very rewarding to be on the commission because you think it’s an airport and you use it every once in a while” but it’s a very important asset, he said.

Quintero helped oversee the airport’s $1.3 billion renovation and played an instrumental role in making the airport more welcoming to international visitors.

He also works as a policy analyst for Santa Clara County Supervisor Cindy Chavez (who earned a bachelor’s in political science from SJSU in 1987) and serves as vice president of the Alum Rock School District Board of Trustees.

 “The commission has prepared me to realize that the decisions you make have an impact on other people’s lives and you have to make sure that you make the right decisions as best as you can,” he said.

 

Spartans at Work: Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series continues with journalism alumnus Matthew Zane.)

Driving along Highway 87, it’s hard to miss the enormous inflatable character sitting atop a 52,000-square-foot purple building on Woz Way.

That structure is home to Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose, which seeks to inspire creativity, curiosity and life-long learning.

For the last eight years, Matthew Zane, ’07 Journalism, has been helping the museum’s staff think through ways to interact with the region’s multicultural community.

“The experiences that I have had here have been invaluable. One of the main things that I’ve learned is how to multitask and how to keep calm and just drive toward my goals,” he said.

As a communications specialist, Zane works on cross-departmental internal and external communications, participates in outreach, and maintains the museum’s online social media presence.

In his current role, Zane strategizes how to communicate key initiatives such as Children’s Discovery Museum’s commitment to combat childhood obesity through healthy eating and active living. Zane is also helping build the museum’s online community.

“I’m learning how to give our audience and my colleagues’ valuable and useful content for the museum’s news feeds and other social media channels,” he said.

Zane started by working at the museum’s youth program summer camp. He was later hired to work full time running a volunteer program and supervising museum floor staff.

As an SJSU student, Zane learned how to interact with the public and be comfortable communicating with people.

“Looking back on all of the resources and the wealth of ideas and support that SJSU had for their students is just something that really impresses me. I could tell that if you put the work in and you were serious about pursuing a career, there where people there that would help to make that happen for you.”

 

 

Spartans at Work: San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series continues with art history graduate student Sarah Dragovich).

Well known in the Bay Area and beyond, the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) offers free admission to some of the most innovative art exhibitions and educational programming in the region, reflecting the entrepreneurial spirit of Silicon Valley.

As a dyed-in-the-wool art lover, Sarah Dragovich, ’13 MA Art History, remembers how excited she was when visiting each new site-specific ICA installation, introduced every three to four months.

When she landed an ICA internship last year, she learned that her passion could become her career.

“There are a lot of career opportunities out there for art and art history majors. But you’ve go to be motivated, persistent and passionate to grab them. You have to build and maintain your network, know your capabilities and strengths, and find a way to integrate them with your passion. In my case, it’s art and culture,” she said.

As gallery administrator, Dragovich is the ICA’s ambassador to the public. She’s the eyes and ears of the organization, connecting artists, visitors and members to the mission.

Her role includes greeting each and every visitor to the gallery. She also manages the ICA’s membership program and administrative office, builds relationships with donors and funders, leads docent tours and manages the organizations’s member database.

Sarah is also learning the business and marketing side of the business and honing her event management skills as she and her colleagues gear up for the ICA’s Annual Art Exhibition and Auction, the gallery’s signature fundraising initiative.

“I feel I am really tapping into my passion for art and art history and making a difference by providing a genuine and genuinely inspired experience to the community,” she said.

Her advice to students and new graduates is to persevere and tap your own resources as well as those within your network. She also encourages students to seek out and apply for internship positions.

Spartans at Work: The Tech Museum of Innovation

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series continues with psychology alumna Maryanne Mwangi.)

In the heart of downtown San Jose is an impressive building with orange walls and a dome roof, home of The Hackworth IMAX Dome Theater and part of The Tech Museum of Innovation. The Tech is a distinctive part of the downtown San Jose skyline and a fitting museum for a city whose motto is “the capital of Silicon Valley.”

“Being that we’re in Silicon Valley, we are surrounded by innovators who create or want to create technology that can change the world, so The Tech is moving towards becoming a resource for those innovators and others around the world, ” said Maryanne Mwangi, ’11 Psychology.

As assistant project manager for the exhibits team, Mwangi provides support during the development and creation of the museum’s experiences. She is there every step of the way from brainstorming and initiation to maintaining a schedule, managing a budget and communicating with other teams during the set-up.

Mwangi assisted with the brand-new experience Social Robots, which opened July 1. Visitors have the opportunity to design and build their own working robots. She describes the “a-ha moment” when people connect the different pieces together, and their robots come alive.

“You come into the Social Robots exhibit and you’re provided with the tools and resources to build something amazing,” she said. “While you’re building you are also learning  how data is transferred between inputs and outputs to create an action. The Tech is providing the opportunity to bring out the innovator that’s in all of us and I think that’s amazing!”

User experience is an important priority in both technology and museums, especially for a technology and science museum that is creating more interactive, hands-on experiences like Social Robots. Mwangi’s psychology education gave her a foundation for brainstorming and collaborating with her team on exhibits.

“It’s an understanding of how people will interact with different things and trying to anticipate how someone will utilize  something that is put out on the floor,” she said. “Psychology plays a role in helping to understand people’s emotions and trying to figure out what would make them happy and  motivated to try something.”

Spartans at Work: Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series continues with hospitality, tourism and event management alumna Gladys Rodriguez.)

Gladys Rodriguez, ’13 Hospitality, Tourism and Event Management, remembers childhood trips from her hometown of Watsonville to the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk. Little did she know that she would grow up to help run the same Friday Night Bands on the Beach concert series she enjoyed when she was younger.

“I have pictures of me on rides when I was two years old, and looking back now, I never thought I would have the opportunity to work at the Boardwalk, and I never thought I would be helping manage such big events,” she said.

A recent SJSU graduate, Rodriguez is a promotions assistant, working closely with the director of promotions and entertainment. Her schedule varies depending on the festivities happening that week.

On Mondays, she focuses on office tasks, such as contacting vendors for an upcoming extreme sports expo. Wednesdays consist of monitoring activity and attendance during Movies on the Beach

The focus of Fridays is supporting the weekly evening concert, from the beginning of the day when she’s picking up the band until the end of the show.

“My favorite thing is that every day is different,” she said. “It’s not only office work. I’m not always sitting. I love that I get to work on something, and at the end, there’s a big event where you see how your hard work pays off.”

Rodriguez was working at the Student Union’s information center when lecturer Rich Larson stopped by to tell her about an open position at the Boardwalk. Larson is program director of the SJSU Special Event Management Team.

Rodriguez was a student manager at the 2013 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, participating in Larson’s program. Working at the golf tournament in addition to other internships and her event management education prepared her well for her current position.

“This job has really shown me that you are ready,” she said. “School did prepare you. School helped you out, and the hospitality program is amazing.”

Spartans at Work: Oakland A’s

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series continues with radio-television-film alumnus Marcus Gonzalez and hospitality, tourism and event management alumnus Ellison DeCastro.)

On a breezy summer evening, fans decked out in green, gold and white head into O.Co Coliseum to root, root, root for the home team. As streams of people make their way through Gate D, they pass by the Oakland A’s Kids Club booth.

There, Ellison DeCastro, ’11 Hospitality, Tourism and Event Management, talks with the youngsters, who stop by to receive the latest stamp in their passport books. They’re working their way up to earn bigger prizes. In the meantime, with a spin of the wheel, will they win a pencil, key chain or temporary tattoo?

As attendees settle into their seats less than 15 minutes before the first pitch, Stomper the elephant mascot and the Oakland A’s promotions crew make their way around the warning track. The entourage includes Marcus Gonzalez, ’10 Radio-Television-Film, who throws beaded necklaces to the excited crowd along the way.

As members of the A’s promotions crew, DeCastro and Gonzalez push the A’s brand and team at Bay Area community events as well as within the concrete walls of the coliseum.

“If it’s a close game, we come out here to cheer, interact with the fans, throw beads or kind of get them riled up a bit, get them excited, pumped up, especially if they’re quiet,” Gonzalez said.

Before the game begins and while it is in session, DeCastro and Gonzalez search for people to participate in promotions and contests between innings. This involves a lot of chatting with fans to find the right candidates.

“The most fun part is interaction with fans,” DeCastro said. Watching a little bit of baseball now and then is a job perk, but he said he lives to “show great hospitality, making fans want to come back out.”

It may be hard to believe now, but Gonzalez was shy when he started attending SJSU. Then he began to break out of his shell when he became involved with the campus radio station KSJS. Being a deejay and representing the station at events turned out to be great practice for his current job.

Both Gonzalez and DeCastro earned spots on the SJSU/Pebble Beach Special Event Management Team, which gives students the opportunity to manage hospitality workers during the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. 

Gonzalez said that experience helped him to begin “seeing myself as a manager, a working professional,” and that “bringing what I learned at Pebble Beach here to the A’s has helped me.”

One of the perks of living in the Bay Area is the many professional sports teams, each with promotions crews and other opportunities for people interested in sports-related careers.  For a lifelong A’s fan like DeCastro, he is exactly where he wants to be.

“It’s pretty much a kid’s dream to work for his favorite baseball team,” he said.

 

Spartans at Work: Monterey Bay Aquarium

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series continues with marine science alumna Sonya Sankaran.)

Sitting atop a yellow grassy hill, Pajaro Valley High School overlooks the Watsonville State Wildlife Area and a series of sloughs that make up the area’s wetlands. Watsonville, located about a half hour northeast of Monterey, is a community known for agriculture. Farms rely on the Pajaro River, which flows into Monterey Bay.

To teach high school students about their natural surroundings, Sonya Sankaran, ’12 M.S. Marine Science, works as a senior bilingual education specialist for the Monterey Bay Aquarium. While attending graduate school at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML), she began volunteering with the aquarium and later found out about this opportunity.

SJSU is the administrator of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, the home of the master’s of marine science program for seven California State Universities. Thanks to her education, Sankaran is able to connect her students with the right experts for their research projects.

“Working at Moss Landing opened innumerable doors for me, which has allowed me to open doors for our students,” she said.

Her specific teen program with the aquarium, Watsonville Area Teens Conserving Habitats (W.A.T.C.H.), is a year-round elective science course offered by Pajaro Valley High School and Watsonville High School. For two weeks over the summer, students learn more about the Pajaro River Watershed from a combination of high school teachers, scientists and W.A.T.C.H. staff as preparation for their year-long school projects. Students have investigated the effects of non-native species on native species, ocean acidification and phytotoxins at a local lake.

Sankaran and her W.A.T.C.H. colleague Enrique Melgoza started their jobs together in April 2012. They are both fluent in Spanish, a useful skill since most of the students in the program come from Spanish-speaking households. Melgoza, ’08 Aviation Management, was raised in Watsonville and said he can relate to their students.

“Some of them don’t have a role model,” Melgoza said, “and for me, I don’t see myself as a role model for them. But they see me as a role model because I’ve been through what they’re going through right now. Then, going to San Jose State and having all of the knowledge—and being successful in my educational career and bringing it back—has helped me out.”

They teach their students to do field work, such as gathering samples and using a water quality testing kit that wirelessly connects with an iPad app. Sankaran’s favorite part of her job is giving her students the opportunity to study and connect with the outdoor environment, especially the ocean.

“A lot of young people don’t have time or opportunities to explore anymore,” she said, adding she enjoys “being able to give them experiences that demonstrate their relationship with the ocean and inspire conservation of their natural resources—experiences that they can share with their community, and eventually, take into their careers.”

Spartans at Work: Great America

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series begins with recreation alumnus Ryan Davies.)

Taking clients on Gold Striker, Great America’s newest ride, and pricing and promoting the amusement park’s Halloween Haunt are a few of the many projects Ryan Davies, ’07 Recreation, is working on this summer.

As group sales area manager, Davies develops print and sales collateral, coupon programs and signage for the park. He also oversees corporate accounts, the call center and the park’s ticketing system.

“My favorite part about my job is that I get to get out from behind my desk and go into the park and see people have fun,” Davies said.

Davies started in 2003 as a ride operator for Xtreme Skyflyer and worked his way up to seasonal managerial roles. Once he graduated from SJSU, his bosses suggested he interview for an administrative role.

This summer, Davies is helping market the new Gold Striker, Northern California’s tallest and fastest wooden roller coaster, standing 108 feet high and soaring at 53.7 MPH.

Davies’ time at Great America taught him about the ins and outs of the amusement park industry and about his potential.

“I just try to push myself to the next level and try to learn everything I can,” Davies said.

A recently added marketing role is helping him grow professionally.

“It’s really important that you work somewhere you want to be and you enjoy what you do,” Davies said.

As an SJSU student, Davies learned about time management and multitasking. He encourages students to take advantage of opportunities made available to students and to get involved on campus.

“I truly attribute where I am to some of the activities I joined,” Davies said.

 

Spartans at Work: NASA Ames

Where will an SJSU degree take you? We hit the road to find out, visiting summer interns and recent grads on the job in the Bay Area and beyond. Our video series continues with Ali Guarneros Luna, ’10 ’12 Aerospace Engineering. She is a systems engineer at NASA Ames Research Center. Read more about her experience! http://bit.ly/sjsu-aluna-post

Spartans at Work: San Jose Rep

Where will an SJSU degree take you? We hit the road to find out, visiting summer interns and recent grads on the job in the Bay Area and beyond. Our video series continues with Oluchi Nwokocha, ’11 Theatre Arts and African-American Studies. Read more about her experience! http://bit.ly/sjsu-rep-post

Spartans at Work: The Walt Disney Family Museum

Where will an SJSU degree take you? We hit the road to find out, visiting summer interns and recent grads on the job in the Bay Area and beyond. Our video series continues with Alex Turner, ’14 Animation/Illustration. He’s an education intern at The Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco. The museum’s collection includes some 25,000 works Disney and his staff used in creating his characters and films. Educational programs include a summer camp, where Alex works. Read more about his experience! http://bit.ly/sjsu-alex-post

Spartans at Work: SolutionSet

Where will an SJSU degree take you? We hit the road to find out, visiting summer interns and recent grads on the job in the Bay Area and beyond. Our video series begins with Miguel Martinez, ’13 Advertising. He’s a summer intern at the San Francisco office of SolutionSet, the second largest independent marketing services company in the U.S. Read more about his experience! http://bit.ly/sjsu-mmartinez

A young woman sitting in front of a clothes rack with colorful costumes

Spartans at Work: At the San Jose Rep, "I Get to Work With Kids and See Their Imagination Grow"

By Sarah Kyo, Web Communications Specialist

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job across the country and around the world. Our Spartans at Work series continues with theatre arts and African-American studies alumna Oluchi Nwokocha.)

Where will an SJSU degree take you? How about helping you develop your career, while you develop others? As an outreach assistant, Oluchi Nwokocha, ’11 Theatre Arts and African-American Studies, helped the San Jose Repertory Theatre make connections with the diverse community that it serves.

Besides responsibilities such as writing grant proposals, designing brochures or supporting various programs, Nwokocha interacted with kids and teenagers through the Creative Dramatics Summer Workshops. This summer camp teaches young participants about improvisation and developing a story for a play, culminating in a performance for family and friends.

“With the process that we do here, we get to really create and play and watch them learn and express themselves,” Nwokocha said. “It’s really cool. I really like that. And I work at a theater. How awesome is that?”

What started as a 2011 internship for the fresh Spartan graduate became a job and a chance to learn about behind-the-scenes work of running a theater, a complement to her acting skills. Observing actors on stage performing their craft was an added bonus.

In a role that is all about making connections, Nwokocha heard about this opportunity at the Rep, thanks to an announcement from one of her SJSU professors.

Her boss at the Rep provided feedback when she applied for graduate school, which is where Nwokocha is heading to this fall to earn a master of fine art in theatre from the University of Florida.

“Networking is really huge in my business,” she said. “It’s more of regardless of talent or what you look like, it’s more of who you know that helps you get your foot in the door, and I can say that’s definitely the case with me.”

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Spartans at Work: At Lucas Arts, “I’m Learning That I Have Certain Assets That Can Help and Serve a Purpose”

Female intern wearing a brown t-shirt stands in front of the Palace of Fine Arts

Jeanie Chang, ’13 Animation/Illustration, spent the summer working as a concept artist with the Lucasfilm University Jedi Academy Summer Internship Program at the Letterman Digital Arts Center in San Francisco (Dillon Adams photo).

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job across the country and around the world. Our Spartans at Work series continues with the class of 2013’s Jeanie Chang.)

For Jeanie Chang, ’13 Animation/Illustration, being “on the job” means having the right attitude and work ethic.

“You can’t just create a pretty picture, it has to serve a purpose,” she said.

Chang  spent the summer working as a concept artist for LucasArts, a top developer of interactive video games, at the 12-week Lucasfilm University Jedi Academy Summer Internship Program at the Letterman Digital Arts Center in San Francisco.

Her team recently released a trailer for the third-person action video game Star Wars 1313, due out next year.

“As a concept artist, I worked on coming up with ideas and the storytelling for the environment,” meaning the scenery behind the characters, Chang said.

In addition to visually representing ideas, Chang worked on reference-gathering and organizing to help the other artists on the team.

Much to Offer

At Lucas Arts, “I’m Learning That I Have Certain Assets That Can Help and Serve a Purpose”

Jeanie Chang’s skills building an environment, or background, are clear in this example from her porfolio at http://jeaniechang.blogspot.com/.

The summer program provided her with many learning opportunities, all of which have helped her to “know better what to expect” in the gaming industry. The most rewarding aspect was learning she has much to offer.

“After to talking to people her, I’ve realized that I know how to really dress up a set and put history behind it,” Chang said. “I have certain assets that can help the company.”

Other rewarding opportunities for Change included seeing behind-the-scenes artwork and working with her concept artist mentors, three SJSU alums.

“We’ve had the same teachers and know the same people,” Chang said. “We speak the same language about art.”

What’s Chang’s advice to those thinking about taking an internship?

“This is your time to really focus on learning and take advantage of all of the opportunities,” she said.

Spartans at Work: At Tesla, "It's Just a Great Work Environment to Learn and to Challenge Yourself"

Spartans at Work: At Tesla, "It's Just a Great Work Environment to Learn and to Challenge Yourself"

By Sarah Kyo, Web Communications Specialist

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job across the country and around the world. Our Spartans at Work series continues with former exchange student Marc Gagnon.)

When considering U.S. exchange programs, Canadian Marc Gagnon had one ultimate goal: to eventually work for electric car company Tesla Motors. SJSU’s location made the school an ideal option.

“Tesla has an office in Palo Alto and the manufacturing plant is in Fremont, so, you know, San Jose is right in between the two,” he said, “and it made a lot of sense to come to San Jose State, and it was the right choice and a great experience.”

Gagnon took engineering classes during Spring 2011, while living at SJSU International House, a dormitory for U.S. and international students. While he wished he could have continued on for an additional semester, his brief taste of Silicon Valley solidified that that was where he wanted to be after graduation.

Silicon Valley is where Gagnon is at today, after earning a mechanical engineering degree from ETS (École de technologie supérieure) in Montreal. In May, he started a new job as a mechanical engineer in Tesla’s Closures Design group, which works on doors, hoods and trunks. Whether it’s the front trunk of the recent Model S or the “falcon wing” doors of the upcoming Model X, Gagnon and his diverse team are problem solvers who try to make cool features work as smoothly as possible. After his time at SJSU, he is grateful for the opportunity to follow his dream.

“I think it’s part of Silicon Valley,” he said. “People come from all over the world to work here, and the people who come here are very motivated about being here, and they want to work hard to make it happen.”

Spartans at Work: At SLAC, “Everything That I’m Doing Here is Completely Brand New”

Spartans at Work: At SLAC, I am Learning to “Quantify the Energy of Terahertz Fields Using Electro-Optical Sampling”

Intern standing in front of the two-mile linear accelerator at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

Tom George, Electrical Engineering’15, is an intern for this year’s SLAC Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship summer program, where he uses lasers to test the terahertz signals on energy (Peter Caravalho photo).

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

(This summer, SJSU Today hits the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job across the country and around the world. Our Spartans at Work series continues with the class of 2015’s Tom George.)

Every day, Tom George, ’15 Electrical Engineering, walks a mile and a half to get to the facility where he works, but he doesn’t mind.

George is spending summer at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) just outside of Palo Alto, tucked away on top of a hill and across 426 acres. George is one of 20 interns chosen to participate in this year’s Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship summer program, which teaches students how to effectively do research, make a presentation and write a paper.

“People here are showing me how much more interesting physics can be than from what we get in the classroom experience,” George said.

SLAC is a research lab operated by Stanford for the U.S. Department of Energy. For over 40 years, the two-mile linear accelerator has been on the forefront of physics research and is famous for looking into the structure of molecules.

George works in the Linac Coherent Light Source facility, using cutting-edge lasers to test the recent progress of terahertz signals on energy.

Learning to Persevere

According to George, everything that he has worked on is brand new. He has had to learn a new lab program in order to take measurements and conduct experiments, not to mention working with lasers that use pump probe techniques. He’s even learning something about himself.

“I’m learning that I get frustrated at times when things don’t work, but that I have to persevere and keep working and even start over if I have to,” George said.

George’s experiences with professors and fellow students in SJSU’s Department of Electrical Engineering have helped him find a passion for teaching.

“SJSU is more like a family and I love that about SJSU,” George said

A young man sitting in a conference room

Spartans at Work: At GGV Capital, I “Get to Meet Great Entrepreneurs”

By Sarah Kyo, Web Communications Specialist

(This summer, SJSU Today hits the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job across the country and around the world. Our Spartans at Work series continues with economics alumnus Andrew Manoske.)

Where will an SJSU degree take you? How about spotting the next big thing? San Jose is the heart of Silicon Valley, where startup companies rely on venture capital to grow. Andrew Manoske, ’10 Economics, is in on the action as an associate with GGV Capital.

Based in Menlo Park with offices in Beijing, Shanghai and Singapore, GGV Capital works with U.S. and Asian companies that already have an established product, but want to take the next big step, including significant funding. This is known as expansion stage, and some of the firm’s prominent success stories include Alibaba, Pandora and Tudou (the Chinese YouTube).

For Manoske, a typical day at the office is outside the office. He regularly meets with clients, the people who “spend every waking moment thinking about how we can use technology to change the world.”

“Every day, I get to meet great entrepreneurs and other venture capitalists that are just really charged, excited, passionate about what they do,” he said.

Manoske, who minored in Computer Science, feels inspired by the people he works with on the job. He also felt inspired by the people and atmosphere of SJSU when applying to this university.

“San José State made hackers,” he said. “They made people who could take very, very little and make amazing, wonderful things out of it, and that was something that really appealed to me. ”