Faculty Notes: Research, Recognition and Recent Publications

Robert Dawson photographing the Main Library, Detroit, Mich. (Courtesy of Dawson)

Robert Dawson photographing the Main Library, Detroit, Mich. (courtesy of Dawson)

Photographer Robert Dawson, a lecturer in the Department of Art and Art History, published The Public Library – A Photographic Essay (Princeton Architectural Press). Over the past 18 years, he has traveled the country, photographing libraries large (the New York Public Library) and small (Tulare County’s one-room library, built by former slaves) to compile the most comprehensive visual survey of American libraries ever published. Accompanying Dawson’s photographs are essays, letters and poetry extolling libraries by Amy Tan, Bill Moyers, Barbara Kingsolver and others.

San Jose State Precision Flight Team

San Jose State Precision Flight Team (courtesy of the team)

Department of English Lecturer Kelly Harrison, who also serves as coach and faculty advisor of the San Jose State Precision Flight Team, celebrated her flight team’s second-place finish in the National Intercollegiate Flight Association Regionals, held in Arizona in February. Teams compete in ground and flying events that range from computer accuracy to short field approach and landing. SJSU’s team is now eligible to compete in the NIFA Nationals Tournament to be held at Ohio State University in May.

School of Library and Information Science Lecturer Michelle Holschuh Simmons, Assistant Professor Michael T. Stephens and Lecturer Melba Tomeo received Excellence in Online Teaching awards from the Web-based Information Science Education (WISE) consortium. All three teach in the Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program, which is delivered exclusively online. This is the fourth win for Simmons, who teaches courses in information literacy and information resources.

Claire Komives

Claire Komives (Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering photo)

Professor of Chemical Engineering Claire Komives received a 2015 Fulbright Scholar research grant. She will spend the academic year working at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi. Dr. Komives’ research will focus on developing a low-cost antidote for snake envenomation. The highly competitive Fulbright grants, one of the most prestigious awards programs worldwide, provide international educational opportunities for a select group of students, scholars, teachers, professionals, scientists and artists.

CommUniverCity San Jose, led by Executive Director and Department of Urban and Regional Planning Department Professor Dayana Salazar, received the Bold Steps for Children Award at the 2014 Santa Clara County Children’s Summit. The Children’s Summit is sponsored by Kids in Common, Santa Clara County’s child advocacy organization. Started in 2005, CommUniverCity engages SJSU students in local, service-learning initiatives that help to build community and solve neighborhood issues.

Susan Shillinglaw

Susan Shillinglaw (Peter Caravalho photo)

Susan Shillinglaw and Assistant Professor Nicholas Taylor, Department of English, read and signed their latest books at Barnes and Noble in San Jose on March 19. Steinbeck scholar Shillinglaw’s On Reading The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin Books) is described by Bookpage as a “concise, penetrating study.” Kirkus Reviews calls Taylor’s The Setup Man, written under the pseudonym T.T. Monday, “a treat for readers of mystery or baseball novels.” Both authors also published books in 2013. Shillinglaw contributed the dual biography Carol and John Steinbeck: Portrait of a Marriage (University of Nevada Press), and Taylor, under his own name, published a historical novel, Father Junipero’s Confessor (Heydey).

Assistant Professor Elizabeth (Elly) Walsh, Department of Meteorology and Science Education, published a peer-reviewed article in the April issue of Nature Climate Change, an interdisciplinary journal devoted to climate change and its impacts. In “Social Controversy Belongs in the Climate Science Classroom,” Walsh argues the importance of including social context and cultural values when teaching climate change in K-12 and college classrooms.

 

Mapbox image of footprints mapped from each major satellite provider.

Applying What She’s Learning to the Hunt for MH 370

 Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200ER (9M-MRO) taking off at Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport (LFPG) in France.

Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200ER (9M-MRO) taking off at Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport (LFPG) in France (Wikipedia/Laurent ERRERA from L’Union, France photo).

From home, a Spartan is helping search for the missing Malaysian Airlines jet.

Joyce Monsees, ’14 Library and Information Science, is one of thousands of volunteers scanning satellite imagery for MH 370.

Joyce Monsees

Joyce Monsees

The work continues even as the Australian Air Force flies to possible wreckage spotted overnight.

Every time we go through another mile, I think at least we’ve narrowed it down, at least we know where it is not,” she said.

What sets Monsees apart from the general public is her experience, goals and academic training.

Since 2012, Monsees has been a member of The Standby Task Force, which organizes digital volunteers into a network poised to deploy in emergencies.  

“In the past, people had to travel to the disaster, and if they couldn’t, all they could do was send money,” she said. The Internet is “making people aware that they can help if they are willing to give their time.”

Analyzing Online Data

The task force analyzes online information, from social media to official records, to create graphics that help relief organizations respond to humanitarian crises, especially natural disasters.

Increasingly and unfortunately, there are more and more disasters that are occurring because of global warming,” said Assistant Professor Christine Hagar. Given “the business that we are in with information science, we can be key players in gathering and disseminating information to various stakeholders.”

Christine Hagar

Assistant Professor Christine Hagar

Hagar’s courses include “Crisis/Disaster Health Informatics,” which Monsees completed. And she’s putting to work what she learned.

“Relief agencies need really good research skills in order to find credible information during a disaster and I’ve got skills,” she says.  After the crisis, “we need to catalog all of this data in a digital library.”

“During the quiet times, we get prepared for the next one by creating emergency operations center pages with databases, medical information and the best news sources for vulnerable areas.”

Crisis Informatics

Although this isn’t an official deployment, Monsees is clarifying the MH 370 search process for everyday people who ask the task force for help.

Like Monsees’ volunteer work, her degree program is exclusively online. Monsees lives in Southern California and Hagar in Great Britain.

Hagar coined the term “crisis informatics” following her study of the information needs of farmers during the U.K. foot-and-mouth outbreak back in 2001.

Monsees hopes her volunteer work will help her land a full time job in informatics, a field she first learned about as a School of Library and Information Science student.

In the first semester is when I discovered all this and that’s when I tailored my degree to head into that direction,” she said. “I realized the skills I’m going to get out of this degree are going to take me where ever I want to go.”

Spartan Nominated for Grammy Award

Spartan Nominated for Grammy Award

Jonathan Ward, who is working on a master’s degree from the School of Library and Information Science, co-produced “Opika Pende: Africa at 78 RPM” (image courtesy of dust-digital.com).

The 55th Annual Grammy Awards will be held this weekend, and at least one Spartan is among the nominees.

Jonathan Ward, who is working on a master’s degree from the School of Library and Information Science, co-produced “Opika Pende: Africa at 78 RPM.”

Ward is modest about his chances of winning. The competition for Best Historical Album includes Paul McCartney, the Beach Boys and Woody Guthrie.

But he is honored to be in the mix, and will attend The 55th Annual Grammy Awards Pre-Telecast Ceremony, along with the other nominees in his category.

Ward’s entry grew out of his “hobby as a collector of 78s — but not just any 78s. His focus is on early recordings of African music,” wrote his hometown newspaper, The Martha’s Vineyard Times. “Mr. Ward assembled the collection of 100 African songs and wrote a 112-page book to describe the music that accompanies the CDs. He produced the CDs in conjunction with Dust-to-Digital, a producer and curator of projects, combining rare recordings with historical images and descriptive texts. Cuts from the album can be accessed at the Dust-to-Digital website, www.dust-digital.com.”

The 55th Annual Grammy Awards Pre-Telecast Ceremony begins 1 p.m. PST Feb. 10 and will be streamed live internationally at GRAMMY.com/live and CBS.com.

A Celebration of SJSU Research

A Celebration of SJSU Research

A Celebration of SJSU Research

Professor of Chemistry Lionel Cheruzel has been tremendously productive in his field of bioinorganic chemistry. He leads an active research group comprised of eight undergraduate students and one graduate student focused on Cytochrome P450 and the synthetic potential for biotechnological applications (photo courtesy of SJSU Research Foundation).

President Mohammad Qayoumi, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn, and Research Foundation Chief Operating Office Mary Sidney cordially invite you to “A Celebration of SJSU Sponsored Research” 3-5 p.m. Oct. 18 in the Student Union’s Barrett Ballroom. Join the entire SJSU community in a celebration of campus-wide research endeavors. Visit research program exhibits. Enjoy presentations by Early Career Investigator Awardees Dr. Lionel Cheruzel (College of Science) and Dr. Lili Luo (College of Applied Sciences and Arts). Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Assistant Professors of Chemistry and Library and Information Science Honored

Assistant Professors of Chemistry and Library and Information Science Honored

An assistant professor of chemistry whose research focuses on one of the most challenging reactions in organic chemistry and an assistant professor of library and information science whose innovative work includes a partnership with the School of Social Work are the recipients of the 2012 SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Awards. The honor recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty members who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Here is the official announcement.

***

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Lionel Cheruzel from the College of Science, and Dr. Lili Luo from the College of Applied Sciences and Arts have both been chosen to receive the San José State University Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award for 2012.  Their selection is made at the recommendation of the Early Career Investigator Subcommittee of the Research Foundation Board of Directors.

The SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Our two recipients are outstanding examples of individuals who have achieved this level of success.

Lionel Cheruzel

Lionel Cheruzel

Dr. Lionel Cheruzel, in his third year at SJSU, has been tremendously productive in his field of bioinorganic chemistry.  Since joining the Department of Chemistry, he has successfully competed for multiple grant awards totaling $480,000. These grants have come from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Research Corporation, and the CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology. In addition to an impressive record of grantsmanship, Dr. Cheruzel has become a valued member of the SJSU faculty through a combination of excellence in teaching and research. Dr. Cheruzel currently leads an active research group comprised of eight undergraduate students and one graduate student. He and his group are focused on Cytochrome P450, and the synthetic potential for biotechnological applications. More on the Cheruzel Research Group can be found at www.sjsu.edu/cheruzel. Dr. Cheruzel has made significant contributions to the development of knowledge in his field as evidenced by his strong publication record with three publications in peer reviewed journals since joining the faculty and one publication currently in review.

Lili Luo

Lili Luo

Dr. Lili Luo, also in her third year at SJSU, has demonstrated an outstanding record of scholarship that has been recognized by federal grant funders. Her work has resulted in several invitations for collaborative research with SJSU scholars, as well as with scholars from external organizations. Since joining the faculty of the School of Library and Information Science, Dr. Luo has been an active researcher in the area of reference services, online learning, and research methods education. In 2010, Dr. Luo received a $122,683 grant award from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services to conduct the first in-depth research regarding text reference services.  Dr. Luo’s scholarly activities also include a partnership with the SJSU School of Social Work, conducting joint research to explore how librarians and social workers can collaborate to improve access to information regarding local social service resources.  Dr. Luo has presented her findings in publications and at professional and scholarly conferences, and was invited to present findings at the International Federation of Library Associations this summer.  Dr. Luo has published eight journal articles since joining the faculty and in 2010 received the Outstanding Teacher’s Award from the School of Library and Information Science.

The SJSU Research Foundation has established two Early Career Investigator Awards in order to encourage participation beyond those colleges where large numbers of faculty have traditionally participated. One award goes to a faculty member in the Colleges of Science and Engineering and another is made to a faculty member from all other colleges. Each awardee will receive a cash award of $1,000 to be used at their discretion.

Professors Honored for Early Career Research

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

An assistant professor of chemistry whose research focuses on one of the most challenging reactions in organic chemistry and an assistant professor of library and information science whose innovative work includes a partnership with the School of Social Work are the recipients of the 2012 SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Awards. The honor recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty members who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Here is the official announcement.

***

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Lionel Cheruzel from the College of Science, and Dr. Lili Luo from the College of Applied Sciences and Arts have both been chosen to receive the San José State University Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award for 2012.  Their selection is made at the recommendation of the Early Career Investigator Subcommittee of the Research Foundation Board of Directors.

The SJSU Research Foundation Early Career Investigator Award recognizes tenure-track SJSU faculty who have excelled in areas of research, scholarship or creative activity as evidenced by their success in securing funds for their research, publishing in peer-reviewed journals and carrying out other scholarly and creative activities at an early or beginning point in their career at SJSU. Our two recipients are outstanding examples of individuals who have achieved this level of success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lionel Cheruzel

Lionel Cheruzel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Lionel Cheruzel, in his third year at SJSU, has been tremendously productive in his field of bioinorganic chemistry.  Since joining the Department of Chemistry, he has successfully competed for multiple grant awards totaling $480,000. These grants have come from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Research Corporation, and the CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology. In addition to an impressive record of grantsmanship, Dr. Cheruzel has become a valued member of the SJSU faculty through a combination of excellence in teaching and research. Dr. Cheruzel currently leads an active research group comprised of eight undergraduate students and one graduate student. He and his group are focused on Cytochrome P450, and the synthetic potential for biotechnological applications. More on the Cheruzel Research Group can be found at www.sjsu.edu/cheruzel. Dr. Cheruzel has made significant contributions to the development of knowledge in his field as evidenced by his strong publication record with three publications in peer reviewed journals since joining the faculty and one publication currently in review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lili Luo

Lili Luo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Lili Luo, also in her third year at SJSU, has demonstrated an outstanding record of scholarship that has been recognized by federal grant funders. Her work has resulted in several invitations for collaborative research with SJSU scholars, as well as with scholars from external organizations. Since joining the faculty of the School of Library and Information Science, Dr. Luo has been an active researcher in the area of reference services, online learning, and research methods education. In 2010, Dr. Luo received a $122,683 grant award from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services to conduct the first in-depth research regarding text reference services.  Dr. Luo’s scholarly activities also include a partnership with the SJSU School of Social Work, conducting joint research to explore how librarians and social workers can collaborate to improve access to information regarding local social service resources.  Dr. Luo has presented her findings in publications and at professional and scholarly conferences, and was invited to present findings at the International Federation of Library Associations this summer.  Dr. Luo has published eight journal articles since joining the faculty and in 2010 received the Outstanding Teacher’s Award from the School of Library and Information Science.

The SJSU Research Foundation has established two Early Career Investigator Awards in order to encourage participation beyond those colleges where large numbers of faculty have traditionally participated. One award goes to a faculty member in the Colleges of Science and Engineering and another is made to a faculty member from all other colleges. Each awardee will receive a cash award of $1,000 to be used at their discretion.

A Day in the Life of an Online SJSU Student

A Day in the Life of an Online SJSU Student

A Day in the Life of an Online SJSU Student

Kate Tasker (SLIS photo)

By Kate Tasker

As an online student in SJSU’s School of Library and Information Science, I have the opportunity to learn from people across the country and around the world. Though my instructors and classmates may live in different time zones or on different continents, we exchange ideas and perspectives via live web-conferencing, recorded audio lectures, screencasts, email, discussion forums, instant messaging, and social networks. Using these communication technologies in the learning environment is fun, and it’s also part of my training as a real-world information professional.

Studying in an online program means that it’s easy to fit graduate school into my work and social life. If I can’t make it to a live virtual lecture, I can listen to the recording when I have time. I can download readings and upload assignments from anywhere, even while traveling. I have the flexibility to decide how many courses to take each semester and how to schedule my time.

This flexibility provides plenty of options for online students, but it does mean that we have to be self-motivated learners with good time-management skills! I schedule my study time and set reminders in a web-based calendar to keep track of my assignment deadlines.

I also rely on other students in the learning community to help me stay focused. Joining student clubs for virtual meet-ups in Second Life or Blackboard Collaborate, connecting with local colleagues at library tours and professional development events, and volunteering in a library or information center are great ways to develop a support network and to make friends in the program.

SLIS student checking into her online classes.

Kate jumps online several times daily to check updates, connect with team members, and join classes via web conferencing (SLIS photo).

Here’s a look at my typical day as an online student at SJSU SLIS:

6:15 a.m.: Time to get up and get ready for work. (I should have put down that novel and gone to bed earlier last night…)

6:45 a.m.: Breakfast at my laptop while I check email, log in to our online course management system Desire2Learn (D2L), and skim discussion forum posts from my Information Literacy classmates. Someone has shared a link to a blog on new methods of library instruction; I add it to my Bookmarks so I can check it out later.

7:30 a.m.: Off to my job as a part-time Archives Technician. Today I’ll be helping a new patron learn to search our collections and find information about her family’s history.

1 – 1:30 p.m.: Lunch time! I hang out with my colleagues and check email during my break. My team members from Collection Management class want to schedule an online meeting on Skype. I reply with possible dates and times and start thinking about the PowerPoint slides for our virtual presentation.

5:30 p.m.: I get home and chat with a friend on Facebook. We swap reading recommendations for new fiction and talk about the classes we’re planning to take next semester.

Kate's D2L home page

Here's how Kate logs in to SJSU's online course management system Desire2Learn (SLIS image).

6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.: Time to log in to Blackboard Collaborate for a live web conference with my Info Lit instructor and classmates. We’re discussing active learning techniques and different ways to engage library patrons. This will really help me with my virtual instruction assignment!

7:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.: Relax and catch up with my roommate over dinner.

8:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.: Download a couple of assigned readings from SJSU’s King Library databases and add my thoughts to this week’s discussion forum.

10:30 p.m.: Wind down with my latest library book (When She Woke, by Hilary Jordan). Aim to hit the lights by 11:30…

Even though my schedule can get pretty hectic, I try to make the most of my time in the Master of Library and Information Science program. I love learning to use different technologies, meeting new people in the virtual world and in the real world, and talking about the future of libraries and learning.

A computer screensheet of the homepage of the School of Library and Information Science's Student Research Journal, including a screenshot of a YouTube video

Student-Edited Journal Showcases Research Articles

By Sarah Kyo, Public Affairs Assistant

A computer screensheet of the homepage of the School of Library and Information Science's Student Research Journal, including a screenshot of a YouTube video

The Student Research Journal publishes graduate students’ work in the field of library and information science.

Many students read scholarly articles for their classes, but not all have the opportunity to publish a research journal while still in school.

From the School of Library and Information Science, the Student Research Journal is SJSU’s first student-governed, online, peer-reviewed research journal. Thus far, articles from the first volume of the biannual publication have been downloaded more than 2,000 times.

For the fall/winter issue, published in December 2011, the staff received manuscripts from 11 graduate library school programs, in addition to SJSU, said Anthony Bernier, professor and faculty advisor of the journal.

Student Research Journal’s acronym, SRJ, is pronounced like the word “surge.” Current editor-in-chief Stacey Nordlund said surge illustrates the journal’s intention as an outlet for students to showcase new ideas, theories and practices in library and information science.

“On a broader scale, the same concept — ‘surge’ — is representative of the school’s vision of delivering innovative programs within the context of new and emerging technologies,” she said.

Bernier said the idea for the journal came from the School of Library and Information Science’s desire to encourage a strong research community within the program. He provides assistance and advice to the editor-in-chief and is part of the journal’s editorial advisory board, which consists of faculty members. The decisions and day-to-day upkeep, however, are up to the editors.

“Students control all content and editorial processes. And they do it all virtually,” Bernier said. “We’ve never had a face-to-face meeting and don’t ever plan on one.”

Connecting Online

The editorial team members are based all over North America and beyond, including Japan. Nordlund said they communicate through email and use Blackboard Communicate for monthly meeting and occasional training sessions.

The editor-in-chief and managing editor determine which submissions will proceed to a double-blind peer review process, which is conducted by two or three editors. Submissions are copy-edited before publication.

Nordlund, who has worked on the journal since last August, intends to graduate this May. She said the publication has had a strong impact on her time at SJSU.

“I would like to express my gratitude to the school for allowing me to participate in this forum, which has allowed me to make a contribution to the library and information science field,” she said. “I also want to tip my hat to all of the editors with whom I have worked on SRJ — both past and present — because the quality of work and dedication exhibited by members of the editorial team has been exemplary.”

Inspiring Students

Sandy Hirsh, professor and director of the School of Library and Information Science, said SRJ provides wonderful opportunities for student researchers to apply what they learn and share knowledge with professionals.

“We’re thrilled to have a committed group of our graduate students learn how to manage this type of scholarly publication,” Hirsh said. “We hope it inspires all SJSU students to publish their research in professional journals — as students and throughout their careers.”

The submission deadline for the next issue has passed, but students are still welcome to submit content for future consideration. To find out more about the Student Research Journal and to read submission guidelines, visit the journal’s website.

School of Library and Info Science Launches Post-Master’s Certificate Program

School of Library and Information Science Launches Post-Master’s Certificate Program

School of Library and Info Science Launches Post-Master’s Certificate Program

Because all courses are fully online, students can live anywhere and complete their coursework when most convenient for them.

Professionals now have an opportunity to continue their education by earning their Post-Master’s Certificate in Library and Information Science from the nationally-ranked San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science. The new certificate program features five career pathways within the ALA-accredited graduate degree program, and all courses are delivered fully online. Applications are now being accepted for a Spring 2012 semester start, which begins January 25, 2012.

The fully-online certificate program is designed for individuals who already hold a master’s degree in any discipline and would like to continue their education to stay current with emerging trends in the library and information science field. Because all courses are fully online, students can live anywhere and complete their coursework when most convenient for them. The certificate program can be completed in as little as one year.

Certificate program students can choose courses in any of the following career pathways:

  • Digital Archives and Records Management
  • Digital Services and Emerging Technologies
  • Information Intermediation and Instruction
  • Web Programming and Information Architecture
  • Youth Services

To earn a Post-Master’s Certificate, students complete six courses (16 units), including a one-unit course that introduces the School’s sophisticated online learning environment, and five courses in a selected career pathway. Certificate program students will engage in a collaborative learning environment with graduate students and faculty in the School’s ALA-accredited Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program, as well as other Post-Master’s Certificate Program professionals.

The deadline to apply for admission to the certificate program for Spring 2012 is January 6, 2012. Spring 2012 courses begin on January 25. Students can also choose to start the program in Fall 2012. Application deadlines for Fall 2012 will be announced soon.

More information about the Post-Master’s Certificate Program.

conference logo

SLIS Sponsors First-Ever Global Virtual Library Conference

conference logo

"Library 2.011" will be entirely online, multilingual and multi-time zone.

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

The San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) will hold the first-ever global virtual library conference November 2-3.

“Library 2.011” will be entirely online, multilingual and multi-time zone, around the clock for two days, according to conference co-chair and SLIS Director Sandra Hirsh.

“The goal is to facilitate and create an environment where we can have a global conversation around key issues, and do it in a way that is aimed at the inclusiveness of the participants,” Hirsh said.

The global conference is a first for the library profession. As of November 1, more than 5,000 people from 150 countries were registered for the event.

Free to participants, the conference will be set up on a Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing platform. This will allow the global community to engage in conversations before and during the conference.

Conference co-chair Steve Hargadon, a social learning consultant for Elluminate/Blackboard Collaborate and the founder of the Web 2.0 Labs, is assisting with the technical arrangements.

“Although it’s not the same as a face-to-face conference, it’s a unique opportunity to chat and connect with other people in the session,” he said.

Starting this month, participants will have the opportunity to schedule their one-hour presentation time slots in any language.

Current talk proposals range from the use of 2.0 emerging technology to the effectiveness of e-picture books for children.

“I’m hoping that this will be the start of an ongoing conversation that can help us to bring and utilize new kinds of technology from each other in this type of environment,” Hirsh said.

The SJSU School of Library and Information Science is the largest accredited library and information science program in the world. By means of its online program, SLIS serves students throughout the United States and in 17 countries.

Gale Antokal and family

More Than 50 Faculty Members Receive Tenure and/or Promotions

Gale Antokal and family

Among the honorees was Professor of Fine Arts Gale Antokal, whose paintings are featured at the President’s House. Her husband and son, a San Jose State freshman, joined her at a recent reception honoring newly tenured and promoted faculty members.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

An acclaimed critical youth studies scholar (Associate Professor Anthony Bernier), a chemist whose student researchers focus on computer animation and visualization of chemical concepts (Associate Professor Resa Kelly), and a baroque trumpeter described as an “exquisite” and “flawless” performer (Associate Professor Kathryn Adduci) are among more than 50 San Jose State faculty members who received tenure and/or promotions in 2010-2011. All were invited to a reception the evening of Sept. 23 hosted by President Mohammad Qayoumi and Provost Gerry Selter. Among the honorees was Professor of Fine Arts Gale Antokal, whose paintings are featured at the President’s House, the reception venue. Antokal’s recent work depicts every day scenes transformed into symbols with greater meaning by her ethereal, almost ghostly, presentations. Her husband and son, a San Jose State freshman, joined her at the event. SJSU’s 1,900 faculty members strive to excel in teaching, research and service. The accomplishments of all those who were recently tenured and/or promoted are summarized in a pamphlet available from the Provost’s Office.

Black and white photo of Amelia Reid with an airplane.

Alumna’s NASA Internship Leads to New Job and Award

Black and white photo of Amelia Reid with an airplane.

A recent alumna processed the papers of an alumna from long ago, NASA "human computer" and aviation enthusiast Amelia Reid.

Editor’s note: The following first appeared in the School of Library and Information Science Community Profiles blog. For an internship, alumna Ratana Ngaotheppitak processed the papers of the late Amelia Reid, a NASA “human computer” who was also an SJSU mathematics alumna.

Alumna Ratana Ngaotheppitak’s seven-month internship at the NASA Ames Research Center helped her secure a job as a NASA Archivist and earn the 2011 SLIS Jean Wichers Professional Practice Award.

“The internship at NASA was the perfect opportunity to gain experience and start working for an agency that will put me on the path to a career in government archives,” said Ngaotheppitak, who graduated from SJSU SLIS in May 2011.

During her Fall 2010 archives internship, Ngaotheppitak worked with a collection documenting one of the “human computers” at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in the 1940s and 1950s. She processed the Amelia Reid Papers from start to finish by completing the accession record, taking an inventory of the materials, performing preservation work, creating a finding aid and a MARC record, and encoding the finding aid for display in the Online Archive of California.

Her professional experience at NASA made Ngaotheppitak a strong candidate for the position of Life Sciences Data Archivist, which she was offered in March 2011. She was subsequently awarded the Jean Wichers Professional Practice Award by SJSU SLIS faculty to recognize her achievements.

As a student, Ngaotheppitak worked hard to develop a professional network and to find learning opportunities. She contacted NASA to arrange a tour of the History Office when she first moved to San Jose, and established a relationship with the History Office Archivist before applying for her internship.

“When you’re a student you have to be really proactive to get the experience that will help you find a job,” explained Ngaotheppitak. “Internships are so valuable, because you really start to network and you have the opportunity to get your foot in the door in a career that you want.”

Ngaotheppitak grew up attending air shows with her father, a mechanical engineer, and has dreamed of working for NASA ever since she decided to become an archivist. One of the reasons she enrolled at SJSU SLIS in Spring 2009 was because of our School’s professional internship opportunities with the NASA Ames Research Center’s History Office and with other institutions.

At SJSU SLIS Ngaotheppitak focused on the Archival Studies Career Pathway and took elective courses in web usability and cataloging, which now support her work in the Life Sciences Data Archive. Ngaotheppitak’s job involves cataloging data from NASA’s space flight experiments, preserving audio and visual materials, and working with the documents collection. She also provides reference services to researchers in the small science library.

“I’m so lucky to be working here, and I’m learning so much,” Ngaotheppitak said.

Read more from the School of Library and Information Science Blog.