Homeland Security Appointment for President Qayoumi

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, pat.harris@sjsu.edu, 408-656-6999

Washington, D.C.
– U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano today announced the appointment of Mohammad H. Qayoumi, president of San Jose State University, to the Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council (HSAAC). The HSAAC, comprised of prominent university presidents and academic leaders, is charged with advising the secretary and senior leadership at the department on several key issues.

“Dr. Qayoumi’s extensive experience and expertise will make him a valuable asset to the council,” said Secretary Napolitano. “I look forward to working with him on these critical issues.”

In this noteworthy role, Qayoumi will provide advice and recommendations on issues related to student and recent graduate recruitment; international students; academic research and faculty exchange; campus resilience; and homeland security academic programs. Qayoumi will also serve as chair of the HSAAC’s new subcommittee on cybersecurity, which will advise on the department’s cybersecurity recruitment and workforce education efforts.

“The mission of the Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council reflects San Jose State’s role as the leading public university powering Silicon Valley,” Qayoumi said. “Among our priorities are attracting the brightest minds to our campus, where we provide academic and pre-professional opportunities to the tech industry workforce of the future.”

Qayoumi is spearheading plans for one of the nation’s first university-based cybersecurity center, which will take a cross-disciplinary approach to workforce development. By fall 2013, San Jose State will hire a cluster of tenure-track faculty members to focus on this endeavor. SJSU will host the U.S. Cyber Challenge Western Regional Summer Cyber Camp for the second consecutive year.

About Qayoumi

Qayoumi holds a bachelor’s in electrical engineering from the American University of Beirut and four degrees from the University of Cincinnati: a master’s in nuclear engineering, a master’s in electrical and computer engineering, an MBA and a doctorate in electrical engineering.

He has more than 32 years of engineering and administrative experience in several universities.  He served as president of California State University East Bay from 2006 to 2011. He came to Cal State East Bay from California State University Northridge, where he served as vice president for administration and finance and chief financial officer from 2000 to 2006, and was also a tenured professor of engineering management.

Qayoumi has served his native country in various financial capacities. He was the senior advisor to the minister of finance of Afghanistan from 2002 to 2005 and served on the board of directors for the Central Bank of Afghanistan from 2003 to 2006.

San Jose State University — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

SJSU Hosts 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp

SJSU Hosts Cyber Quests Day Camp

SJSU Hosts 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp

Participants of the day camp will learn key skills required to score well in the April 2013 Cyber Quests Qualification Competition (Robert Bain photo).

Contacts for reporters:
Rudy Pamintuan, USCC Media Relations, 312-961-4710
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, 408-656-6999

The U.S. Cyber Challenge has announced the date and details of the 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp. The day camp will take place on Saturday, April 6 at San Jose State University beginning at 9 a.m. and concluding at 5 p.m. To learn more information and register for the 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp, visit www.sjsu.edu/cybersecurity.

“As the largest public university serving Silicon Valley, San Jose State must take the lead in providing students with opportunities to become immersed in cyber security, a top international issue,” said SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi. “San Jose State is pleased to collaborate with the U.S. Cyber Challenge to develop programs attracting the brightest minds to one of the most critical emerging fields of our time.”

Participants of the day camp will learn key skills required to score well in the April 2013 Cyber Quests Qualification Competition. Presentations may include introductions to Wireshark and web application and database security, securing network services, network discovery methods and a host of other topics. Sponsors of the 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp include Visa and the Bay Area Council.

“We are very proud to host our first Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp,” stated Karen S. Evans, National Director of U.S. Cyber Challenge. “We believe that equipping students with the knowledge and skills to do well in the Cyber Quests online competition will lead to more students being invited to our Summer Cyber Camps and ultimately exponential growth in the capacity of our professional workforce in cyber security.”

Participants are required to be 18 years or older. There are no specific credentials or skills required to attend the day camp, although camp content will be quite technical and will require some background in computer science. Admission is free, but spots are limited. Therefore, it is suggested to register as soon as possible before the camp is filled to capacity.

Cyber Quests is an online cybersecurity competition operated by Cyber Aces. Top scorers earn an invitation to the U.S. Cyber Challenge Western Regional Summer Cyber Camp to be held at SJSU in August 2013. The Cyber Quests competition will open on April 16 and end on April 30. Registration begins on March 29. To register, visit USCC.CyberQuests.org.

About San Jose State University

San Jose State – Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,500 students and 3,850 employees – is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

About U.S. Cyber Challenge

The mission of the U.S. Cyber Challenge (USCC) is to significantly reduce the shortage in the cyber workforce by serving as the premier program to identify, attract, recruit and place the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. USCC’s goal is to find 10,000 of America’s best and brightest to fill the ranks of cybersecurity professionals where their skills can be of the greatest value to the nation.

About the National Board of Information Security Examiners

The mission of the National Board of Information Security Examiners (NBISE) is to increase the security of information networks, computing systems, and industrial and military technology by improving the potential and performance of the cyber security workforce.

About CyberAces

The mission of CyberAces is to identify, enable and encourage young Americans with high aptitude for technical achievement in information security to discover their talents, develop their passion, and determine where their talent can be nurtured so they can make a major contribution to the physical and economic security of the US and its enterprises.The CyberAces foundation achieves its mission by offering challenging and realistic cybersecurity competitions, training camps and educational initiatives through which high school, college students and young professionals develop the practical skills needed to excel as cybersecurity practitioners and to become highly valued citizen-technologists.

SJ Mercury News: Time for State to Transform College System

Posted by the San Jose Mercury News Jan. 16, 2013.

The online education program San Jose State University announced Tuesday, with the help of Gov. Jerry Brown, is small — just three classes of 100 students each. But it is a big step toward a new future for higher education that Brown introduced in last week’s budget proposal.

California’s three-legged system of higher education — community colleges, the California State University and University of California systems — has been a primary driver of the Golden State’s economic engine. But it has been slow to adapt to new realities. Costs are rising unsustainably; tuition has nearly doubled at CSU and UC since 2007. Just 16 percent of CSU students finish a degree within four years. And there is a troubling mismatch between the number of graduates in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields and the number of jobs in those fields that companies will need to fill.

Part of the problem is declining state support. The UC and CSU budgets were cut $1.6 billion, inflation adjusted, in the past decade. Although Brown wants to restore some of that, taxpayer funding will not return to its former levels.

A major transformation is needed to lower costs for students and taxpayers and to increase the number of students getting degrees, especially in STEM fields. Brown included $37 million in this budget for Internet learning initiatives, along with hundreds of millions more to restore some cuts. But he is also demanding that the systems reduce costs, improve access to courses students need for degrees and improve graduation rates.

The SJSU pilot the governor praised Tuesday has elements of all of that. The partnership with Udacity, a Palo Alto online education company, is for three classes: entry-level math, elementary statistics and college algebra. The courses are required, but too many students have trouble passing. That makes them good choices for this experiment with an interactive curriculum and a low cost — $150, not much more than a community college course.

SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi is a leading advocate for sweeping reforms. He co-wrote a paper last fall recommending that dozens of introductory courses — things like Economics 101 — be redesigned and offered online. The classes would have a common numbering system, and all three college systems would use them.

This would benefit students, taxpayers and businesses. It would make transferring from community college seamless. It would help keep students in school in the crucial first years by making the curriculum more interactive, which has been proven to engage students. And Qayoumi estimates it could reduce the overall cost of higher education by 16 percent.

This won’t happen quickly. But the SJSU pilot, along with Brown’s enthusiasm, could begin the transformation.

ABC7: SJSU Launches Online Courses for Credit

ABC7: SJSU Launches Online Courses for Credit

Click here to view the ABC7 story.

Posted by ABC 7 Jan. 15, 2013.

By Associated Press (ABC7 News contributed to this report.)

SAN FRANCISCO — San Jose State University and a Silicon Valley company on Tuesday announced a partnership to offer affordable online classes for credit, an initiative backed by Gov. Jerry Brown to help California colleges reduce costs and expand student access.

The pilot program, co-developed by San Jose State and Palo Alto-based Udacity Inc., will begin offering three entry-level courses for $150 each starting later this month. The California State University campus charges about $620 for similar classroom-based courses.

The online effort began this past summer when the governor called Udacity CEO Sebastian Thrun and asked him to help develop digital courses for California colleges. Thrun is a researcher at Stanford University and Google Inc. who launched Udacity to provide so-called massive open online courses, or MOOCs.

Brown said Tuesday the goal is to allow students to “graduate quicker so they don’t carry this big load of debt on their backs for the next 25 years,” noting that only 16 percent of Cal State students graduate in four years.

The initiative, called “San Jose State University Plus,” is different from other online education programs because it will offer introductory courses for credit, charge low fees and welcome students who don’t attend the school, officials said.

The pilot program will enroll about 100 students in each class, with half from outside San Jose State. It will target high school students, waitlisted community college students, members of the armed forces and veterans.

The first classes offered will be pre-algebra, algebra and elementary statistics – three-unit “gateway courses” with high failure rates that are required for most Cal State degree programs.

“These are the courses that are high demand. Everybody needs them to move to the next part of their curriculum sequence,” said Timothy White, the new chancellor of the 23-campus CSU system.

San Jose State faculty will be the instructors of record for the classes and will evaluate students. No textbooks are required, and students will have access to mentors through chat rooms, a helpline and other means.

“I’ll be communicating with those students via chat and tutoring them. Udasity is also going to be offering online tutoring,” said Sandra DeSousa, a SJSU algebra professor.

“I want to democratize education. I want to level the playing field for everybody,” Thrun told ABC7 News.

“After all, we are here in San Jose, the capital of Silicon Valley, the cradle of creatively and the epicenter of innovation,” said San Jose State president Mohammad Qayoumi.

San Jose student Alan Cochrane told ABC7 News he likes the idea. He said, “I feel like it may be cheaper. For me personally, I like on line courses because it helps me focus more.”

Brown said, “It’s an experiment and we’re going to learn together. That’s why I think we will succeed.”

Thrun admits the pilot project is a work in progress. He told ABC7 News, “Wait two or three years into it. I hope it’s going to be much, much better.”

In his 2013-2014 budget, Brown has proposed giving California’s public colleges and universities more money. But in return, the Democratic governor wants them to hold down costs, stop raising tuition and embrace online learning.

Brown is scheduled to attend the University of California Board of Regents meeting on Wednesday, when university officials plan to discuss plans to expand online learning at the 10-campus system. Leaders of the online education providers Coursera, edX and Udacity are expected to speak at the gathering.

U.C. has spent $4 million to market the idea, but only one person who wasn’t already a U.C. student, has signed up for any of the 14 courses.

ABC7 News contributed to this report.

 

Governor Helps Launch SJSU Plus

Top elected and higher education officials joined Silicon Valley’s leading entrepreneurs at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Library on Jan. 15 for the advent of a groundbreaking partnership aimed at bridging public higher education with a promising Silicon Valley startup.

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. spoke at the event about the long-term potential for San Jose State Plus before SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi and Udacity Inc. CEO and Co-Founder Sebastian Thrun signed the official agreement.

In his first public appearance at SJSU, recently appointed California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White provided a systemwide perspective on the announcement and online education. Silicon Valley entrepreneur Marc Andreessen attended to lend his support.

SJSU community members joined the media and officials to participate in a rigorous question and answer session including Brown, Qayoumi, Thrun, White and SJSU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn.

Read the full news release about today’s announcement. View a recording of the news conference and join the conversation about #SJSUPlus on Twitter.

 

 

 

SJSU Plus Announcement

SJSU and Udacity Partnership

SJSU Plus Announcement

This marks the first time that a broad and diverse range of students, not just matriculated students, will have access to online college classes for credit from an accredited university at a very affordable price of $150 per course.

San Jose State University and Udacity Announce Partnership to Pilot For-Credit Online Courses to Expand Access to Higher Education

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, (408) 656-6999
The OutCast Agency (for Udacity), (415) 392-8282

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University and Silicon Valley-based online education startup Udacity Inc. have reached an agreement to develop a pilot program to be called San Jose State Plus, offering college classes for credit to SJSU and non-SJSU students beginning in January 2013. Registration begins today. View video and photos from a news conference held Jan. 15.

The partnership will combine the knowledge and expertise of SJSU faculty members with Udacity’s cutting-edge online platform and pedagogy to work together toward helping a greater percentage of students excel in their chosen majors. This pilot purposely focuses on two math classes and one statistics class that nearly every student must complete to succeed in college.

“As the public university that sends 8,000 graduates annually into the Silicon Valley workforce, San Jose State University must and will take a leading role in leveraging technology to transform higher ed with the goal of making a college degree affordable and accessible to all,” said SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi.

The passage of Proposition 30 signaled renewed voter support for public higher education in California. But limited public resources, coupled with an ever growing need for college graduates to fuel the state’s tech economy, means educators must seek the most effective means to expand access reflecting the California Master Plan for Higher Education’s commitment to a college education for all who qualify.

Expanding Access

This marks the first time that a broad and diverse range of students, not just matriculated students, will have access to online college classes for credit from an accredited university at a very affordable price of $150 per course, about the same as a course at the California Community Colleges.

The pilot’s target population includes underserved groups such as high school students who will earn college credit, waitlisted students at California Community Colleges who would otherwise face out-of-state or private options, and members of the armed forces and veterans. The National Science Foundation will provide funding to support the assessment of this groundbreaking effort.

“By providing engaging, accessible and affordable classes, we are studying whether this pilot offers a new pathway to credit for students currently shut out of the higher education system,” said Udacity CEO and Co-Founder Sebastian Thrun. “We have always pushed ourselves to improve online learning technology to provide the very best higher education has to offer to students everywhere, including students right here in California. We have much to learn, but are excited by the potential this partnership represents.”

Intermediate Algebra, College Algebra and Elementary Statistics are the three courses to be offered in this pilot. SJSU faculty members working with Udacity designed and created all three classes to include engaging video instruction interspersed with quizzes and other interactive elements, as well as course mentors supporting students throughout the course.

Innovative Faculty

“This pilot is possible because of our extraordinary and dedicated faculty members who care deeply about student learning and success, and their willingness to explore new ways to teach students, especially traditionally underserved students who aspire to college degrees and beyond,” said SJSU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn.

“Serving Silicon Valley, one of the most vibrant centers of innovation in the nation, San Jose State is home to instructors who are innovators, stepping up to team with Udacity,” Provost Junn continued. “Together, we will explore and evaluate, in a systematic way, how we can provide a high-quality, interactive and exemplary online learning experience for all students that is affordable, lends greater access and ensures student success.

The pilot program will address and study a number of pressing questions facing online learning including massive open online courses. Distinctive features include the following:

  • SJSU faculty members will create and teach the courses in coordination with Udacity, and will be the instructors of record throughout the term. SJSU faculty members will carry the sole authority and responsibility for assessing student learning. Each course will be enriched with support provided by Udacity staff members and course mentors, who will track, encourage and monitor students.
  • Three critical entry-level courses with high failure rates were selected for this pilot. Revising these key classes to improve student interest, engagement, motivation and learning should result in multiple positive outcomes for later academic success.
  • In this pilot, student enrollment will be limited to 100 students per course, with 50 SJSU students and 50 non-SJSU students. Priority enrollment will be given to high school students, community college students, members of the armed forces, veterans and waitlisted SJSU students. All students will earn college credit.
  • This pilot will include the formal collection and analysis of student learning data and faculty feedback to assess progress and mastery of course learning objectives and outcomes. Faculty members will be involved in this assessment by an external firm.
  • There will be no textbooks required for any of the courses as the content will be embedded and self-contained online. Faculty members may recommend optional open-source or free textbooks for students who would like additional outside materials.
  • Human mentoring will be available via chat rooms, a helpline, instructor-facilitated peer meetings and outreach when a student is falling behind and needs more encouragement and support.
  • Exams will be proctored online, with no campus visits required. Student identity authentication and compliance with all applicable privacy laws will be ensured and protected. Accessibility and compliance with all applicable laws for students with disabilities will be addressed.

SJSU’s Next Generation Initiative

This effort is part of a campaign led by President Qayoumi, who argues educational institutions urgently need new approaches to teaching and assessing learning that are personalized, collaborative, engaging and that relate to real-world, 21st-century problems. Learn more via the president’s white paper “Reinventing Public Higher Education: A Call to Action.”

“SJSU Plus represents the dawn of a new era in providing high-quality college courses at an affordable price for anyone, anywhere, anytime,” President Qayoumi said. “San Jose State is proud to be a pioneer and trailblazer with Udacity in this important initiative.”

About San Jose State

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,500 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

About Udacity

Udacity is a social venture that seeks to bring accessible, engaging, and effective higher education to the world. We believe that higher education is a basic human right, and we seek to empower our students to develop their skills in order to advance their education and careers.  Udacity has been at the forefront of developing new online pedagogy that bridges education and employable skills with courses in Computer Science, Mathematics, Programming, General Sciences, and Entrepreneurship at www.Udacity.com.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is SJSU Plus and why is SJSU involved in this effort?

SJSU is partnering with Udacity in a groundbreaking online education venture (known as SJSU Plus) to be among the first university to pilot a new form of interactive online courses to formally test if this modality enhances student learning and might improve greater access to higher learning through the use of educational technology. This partnership seeks to provide online, accessible, affordable, engaging, and highly effective courses created by our own SJSU faculty that would be available for credit at a very affordable price for all students, including under-served populations of students. Should this initial pilot of three online, entry-level courses be successful, it also might be part of an innovative solution to address the increasing demand for higher education needs in California, particularly in STEM fields.

Why was Udacity chosen as a partner?

Udacity was an early pioneer in massive open online courses (MOOC) and offers highly-engaging video content mixed with frequent interactive quizzes and a contextual “learn by doing” approach. Their newest approach also integrates more human interaction and connection by utilizing forums and mentors.

Why did Udacity decide to partner with San Jose State University?

Udacity believes that as Silicon Valley’s largest public university, San Jose State University has been particularly progressive in its approach to embracing new ways of teaching. Udacity was excited to collaborate with SJSU as part of a campaign led by President Qayoumi, who argues that higher educational institutions urgently need new approaches to teaching and assessing learning that are personalized, collaborative, engaging and that relate to real-world, 21st-century problems.

Who else is involved in this effort?

There are other external organizations that are interested in this pilot for a variety of reasons.

  • The National Science Foundation, through its Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science program, is funding our pilot to evaluate student outcomes in these pilot classes.
  • The American Council on Education (ACE) will be evaluating these courses, as well as Udacity’s Computer Science 101 course, in order to recommend them for credit among their nearly 2,000 member institutions.
  • Additionally, through a grant from the Gates Foundation, ACE will be conducting research with University of Illinois, Springfield, on what student demographic groups are best served by and benefit from access to open online courses.

Are our faculty members teaching the courses?

Yes, our SJSU faculty members are creating the three pilot courses in coordination with Udacity, and they will be the sole instructor of record throughout the term. SJSU faculty members will carry the sole authority and responsibility for assessing student learning. SJSU professors will lead the development of the course curriculum and instruction. Udacity provides the platform as well as support in developing course elements (e.g., videos, activities, quizzes) and consults on instructional design optimized for the online medium. Each course will be enriched with additional student support provided by Udacity staff members and course mentors, who will track, monitor and encourage students.

How and why were the courses selected? How were faculty selected?

For this pilot, three foundational, bottleneck, entry-level courses, often with high failure rates were selected. By revising these key, gateway classes to improve student interest, engagement, motivation and learning, SJSU hopes to garner multiple positive outcomes for student learning and future academic success.

Once courses were identified, faculty were recruited by working with relevant department chairs, deans and associate deans who solicited faculty interest and willingness to work on developing these innovative online courses.

What are the specific chosen courses?

  1. Developmental Math (Entry-Level Math, Algebra Review) Math 6 Course. Description: This course uses algebra to quantify and describe the world around us by exploring questions like “How many songs can fit onto your flash drive?”, or “What’s a better deal: The family size box of crackers or the regular box of crackers? By the end of the course, students will have stronger skills for modeling problems, analyzing patterns, and using algebra to arrive at conclusions.
  2. College Algebra Math 8 Course. Description: This class illustrates that math is everywhere. Students gain an in-depth understanding of algebraic principles, and learn how to use them to solve problems that they encounter in everyday life. Students learn about functions, polynomials, graphing, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic equations, and much more, all through exploring real-world scenarios.
  3. Elementary Statistics Stats 95 Course. Description: Students learn how to organize, describe, and interpret data, enabling them to think about the information in a whole new light. The class allows students visualize data, calculate statistics that describe data, and use statistical methods to make decisions.

How many students will be enrolled in SJSU Plus?

In this pilot, student enrollment will be limited to 100 students per course–with 50 SJSU students and 50 non-SJSU students. Priority enrollment will be given to interested and/or waitlisted SJSU students, as well as non-SJSU students, such as high school students, community college students, and members of the armed forces or veterans. All students in our SJSU Plus pilot will earn college credit that would be transferable to our campus or any other accredited campus.

How much will the courses cost for students and what services will be provided?

Each SJSU Plus course will be very affordable and cost $150 for matriculated and non-matriculated students and will be offered this Spring 2013 through SJSU’s College of International and Extended Studies. This is a revised MOOC 2.0 model (as Udacity calls it), where enrolled for-credit students will receive access to SJSU professors, additional support services, proctored and authenticated online exams, and course mentors. These augmented services for students are designed to improve student connections with the professor and strengthen and support students’ learning opportunities. Furthermore, for SJSU students, the cost of these courses through CIES could be covered for eligible students under state (but not federal) financial aid.

For students not interested in college credit, access to the MOOC courses will be open and free as in the original MOOC 1.0 model. Non-credit students will not receive any interaction from professors, nor receive any of the additional student support services, and of course, no college credit.

Is there a revenue share to this agreement?

Yes, after deducting combined SJSU and Udacity development and implementation costs, there is a revenue share agreement. Developing and offering these courses requires investments in a variety of baseline costs, such as course development and technical staff costs, instructor training and support services, as well as online proctoring, authentication and other administrative costs. In our joint collaboration, SJSU and Udacity are partners in sharing revenues after costs.

What are the dates of these courses?

These pilot courses will run during spring semester 2013, from Jan. 30, 2013 to mid-May 2013.

Are there textbooks?

There will be no textbooks required for any of the courses as the content will be embedded and self-contained online. Faculty members may recommend optional open-source or free textbooks for students who would like additional outside materials.

Unlike other Udacity courses, are these classes more schedule-centric? Are there certain deadlines for fulfilling the course requirements?

The courses for credit will follow a similar schedule as those taught on campus. However, since Udacity courses can be taken at home or on the go, students will be able to watch lectures, participate in quizzes, and engage fellow students at any time that is convenient to them throughout the day/night.

Will there be any contact between faculty and students and among students?

Human mentoring will be available via chat rooms, a helpline, professor-facilitated peer meetings and mentor outreach when a student is falling behind and needs more encouragement and support.

How will student identities be verified during exams?

Exams will be proctored online, with no campus visits required. Student identity authentication and compliance with all applicable privacy laws will be ensured and protected. Accessibility and compliance with all applicable laws for students with disabilities will be addressed.

Will there be an assessment of these courses?

Yes, one of the major goals of this pilot is to include the formal collection and statistical analyses of both quantitative and qualitative student learning data, as well as faculty and student feedback to assess student progress and mastery of course learning objectives and outcomes.

Faculty members will conduct their normal assessments and evaluation of student learning for their courses, and they also will be involved in an additional third-party assessment conducted by an external firm and funded by a NSF grant.

Data and resulting reports regarding the outcomes of this pilot will be publicly available, widely disseminated and published whenever possible.

 

SJSU Hosts 21st Century Teaching Symposium

21st Century Teaching Symposium

SJSU Hosts 21st Century Teaching Symposium

“Technology is changing everything, and teaching should be no different. But what stays the same is the learning process: reflection, discussion, and problem solving,” said keynote speaker Candace Thille, director of Carnegie Mellon’s Open Learning Initiative.

To strengthen the faculty’s interest in next-generation technologies, SJSU hosted the “21st Century Teaching: Opportunities and Incentives” symposium Sept. 24 at King Library.

The one-day workshop focused on using online educational resources to enhance student learning. More than 150 faculty members attended, building on SJSU’s Next Generation Technology Initiative.

“It is so exciting that faculty members want to learn something new to help our students and leverage technology we have here in Silicon Valley,” said Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn.

Keynote speaker Candace Thille, professor and director of the Open Learning Initiative at Carnegie Mellon University, discussed developing better tools for teaching today’s student within an open-source learning environment.

“There is a great diversity in how well prepared students are and what skills they have to engage [in university life] once they get here,” Thille said.

She also discussed developing goal-directed practices, building fluency in open-source learning environments, and using interactive student data to guide teaching.

“Technology is changing everything, and teaching should be no different,” Thille said. “But what stays the same is the learning process: reflection, discussion, and problem solving.”

After Thille’s address, SJSU faculty members from the colleges of engineering, education, business and social sciences presented existing online education initiatives and the results of these experiences.

Over lunch, faculty members discussed and joined various technology-related Faculty Learning Communities to explore the new teaching landscape with colleagues.

Topics include Affordable Learning Solutions, Big Datalecture capture/video conferencing, and learning and games.

You can view the full symposium here.

SJSU Launches Major Tech Initiative

Media contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, 408-656-6999
Andrea Cousens, Cisco Communications, 310-270-8903
Meredith Ehrenberg, Nexus Communications, 949-265-6088

SAN JOSE, CA – As the only large public university in Silicon Valley and as the major source of workforce power for the region’s tech industry, San Jose State University has launched a five-year, $28 million initiative to partner with Cisco and Nexus IS Inc. to upgrade the campus’ information technology infrastructure.

Moreover, San Jose State is supporting faculty in using and applying next generation technologies to better support students’ learning by partnering with corporate neighbors and with other cutting edge educational efforts such as Harvard-MIT-UC Berkeley’s edX and Carnegie Mellon University’s Open Learning Initiative.

SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi outlines the long-term potential for this tech initiative in his white paper, “Reinventing Public Higher Education: A Call to Action.”

“The university sits in a position of real opportunity given the double incentive of recent technological advances coupled with the decline in state support for public education,” President Qayoumi said. “Never before in the history of higher education has technology provided such important challenges and opportunities. We must reinvent teaching, learning and educational delivery systems.”

The Next Generation Technology Project reflects “SJSU’s Strategic Plan: Vision 2017,” developed after President Qayoumi’s 49 town hall meetings with students, faculty and staff who collectively identified five distinct campus priority goals including supporting “Unbounded Learning,” “21st Century Learning Spaces” and “Agility Through Technology.”

Students work together in class

These SJSU electrical engineering students are working on problem sets in class after viewing edX lecture videos at home, a concept known as a “flipped class” (Christina Olivas photo).

An Integrated Plan

San Jose State selected Cisco and Nexus to upgrade the campus’ infrastructure in accordance with a fully integrated and comprehensive plan designed to improve the learning experience for students. Plans for the first 18-24 months include the following:

  • SJSU will develop a total of 51 next-generation learning spaces with all the equipment needed to enable high-definition recording, indexing and transcription of lectures and classroom experiences within the next 18 months. Eleven next-generation learning spaces will be completed this fall, with the remaining 40 to be completed by the start of fall 2013.
  • SJSU will make Cisco Show and Share® and TelePresence® available at no cost to all students, faculty and staff within the next 18 months. These services will be fully integrated with audio and video recording equipment in the 51 next-generation learning spaces, providing students with access to classroom experiences, lectures and meetings anytime and anywhere.
  • SJSU has brought Cisco WebEx® web conferencing to the campus community.  WebEx provides access to live lectures inside the 51 next-generation classrooms and beyond, anytime and anywhere faculty members and students connect using cameras on their own computers.
  • SJSU will consolidate phone service from five separate systems into a single Cisco Unified IP Phone system for the entire campus within the next 18 months.
  • SJSU will expand its free, secure wireless Internet service, utilizing Cisco wireless solutions to serve all students, faculty, staff and guests campuswide.

Mindful of the dramatic budget cuts that continue to loom for the state and public higher education, the first year of the project will be funded by proceeds from the sale of San Jose State’s Educational Broadband Service spectrum, facilitated by the Federal Communications Commission to increase educational programming accessible via the Internet. Other funding sources include the ongoing SJSU Information Technology Services office budget, SJSU’s new Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee, and SJSU’s continuing education program.

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

Supporting Student Learning

The goal is not to replace conventional teaching methods, but build on what we do now in order to enhance student learning and preparation for the workplace. Numerous studies have shown outcomes improve when instructors and students combine traditional and new teaching methods using the latest technology.

For example, “lecture-capture” software and equipment will allow students to review as many times as needed all aspects of a classroom presentation, including slides and whiteboard notes. This could benefit all students on all topics, but will be especially helpful for challenging classes heavy with complex material or for students who speak English as a second language.

“This is a top priority for San Jose State, which seeks to provide access to higher education and professional opportunities for many first-generation Americans in the heart of Silicon Valley, where science, technology, engineering and mathematics are at the core of the industries driving the regional economy,” Qayoumi said.

New Teaching Methodologies

In addition to the IT infrastructure upgrade, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn, along with Associate Vice President for Academic Technology Catheryn Cheal, are leading efforts to strategically employ and assess new teaching methodologies with faculty and other key industry leaders such as Adobe to deepen San Jose students’ skills with new technology products and services.

“San Jose State University is uniquely positioned to be pioneers in the use of academic technology because we are the only large, public university located in the heart of Silicon Valley. It has been incredibly gratifying to reach out to the industry leaders in our backyard, and receive such a positive response in terms of partnering with our faculty to develop and use technology to enrich and deepen our students’ learning and skills in the digital world,” Provost Junn said.

Dr. Ellen Junn

Dr. Ellen Junn

“Our graduates go on to become top hires for many of the tech industries here in Silicon Valley,” Junn said. “So, it’s no surprise that San Jose State and our technology partners want to invest more in our students by working closely with our faculty to become cutting edge adopters and forerunners in the use of academic technology to enhance student learning.”

Some of the new programs that will be launched this fall for faculty include the following:

  • Enhancing students’ use of Adobe® Creative Suite® software and digital media.
  • Innovating learning with Apple products such as iPads, iBooks, iTunesU and iMovie.
  • Designing more effective learning experiences for students by creating online, hybrid and flipped (viewing recorded lectures at home so instructors can work with students in class) courses.
  • Implementing lecture capture and video conferencing.
  • Introducing the use of online student writing support tools such as ETS Criterion.
  • Joining with Harvard-MIT-UC Berkeley’s edX initiative and with Carnegie Mellon University’s Open Learning Initiative.
  • Tracking and measuring student learning with learning analytics and learning dashboards.
  • Utilizing assessment tools such as ETS Major Field Tests and ETS Proficiency Profile to measure student learning outcomes and support institutional reporting.
  • Leveraging game-based resources for student learning.
  • Making educational materials from the KQED and PBS LearningMedia archive available to faculty and students in partnership with the University Library.

“At SJSU, we seek to become recognized leaders in developing innovative and effective curricula, reinventing and supporting faculty work, deepening student engagement with academic and professional learning and expanding our international and global connections by utilizing effective new technologies to meet academic goals,” Provost Junn said. “It’s a very exciting time to be at San Jose State—we are a community of faculty, students and staff who are on the move!”

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,500 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) is the worldwide leader in networking that transforms how people connect, communicate and collaborate. Information about Cisco can be found at http://www.cisco.com. For ongoing news, please go to http://newsroom.cisco.com.

EdX is a not-for-profit enterprise of its founding partners Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that features learning designed specifically for interactive study via the web. Based on a long history of collaboration and their shared educational missions, the founders are creating a new online-learning experience with online courses that reflect their disciplinary breadth. Along with offering online courses, the institutions will use edX to research how students learn and how technology can transform learning-both on-campus and worldwide. Anant Agarwal, former Director of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, serves as the first president of edX. EdX’s goals combine the desire to reach out to students of all ages, means, and nations, and to deliver these teachings from a faculty who reflect the diversity of its audience. EdX is based in Cambridge, Massachusetts and is governed by MIT and Harvard.

 # # #

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco’s trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company.

Adobe and Creative Suite are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries.

 

Fall 2013 Frosh and Transfer Applications Surge

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

Fantastic weather greeted new students at the Fall Welcome Days Kick-Off Aug. 21 on Tower Lawn. A folklorico group was among the entertainers at the event (Christina Olivas photo).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

What’s the roar coming from downtown San Jose? That’s the sound of 30,500 Spartans heading to campus for fall 2012!

As usual, the academic year began with fantastic weather. During the sunny but cool afternoon of Aug. 21, new students crowded Tower Lawn for the Fall Welcome Days Kick-Off.

The event was SJSU’s way of welcoming 3,445 first-time freshmen, 3,370 new community college transfers and 1,900 new graduate students to campus, very close to matching last year’s grand total.

With music booming, students ate ice cream, lined up for caricatures and took a ride down giant inflatable slides while meeting new people and learning about SJSU organizations and departments.

The next day, thousands of Spartans flooded campus for the first day of classes, searching for parking and perhaps hoping to drop/add a course or two.

New Services

The most obvious change was tremendous progress on the construction of the new Student Union. When students left for the summer, there was little more than a foundation.

Now you can see the curvy exterior of the western expansion near the Music Building and a tiered theater taking shape near the Business Tower.

The Spartan Bookstore was crowded with students, who can now charge up to $900 in books and supplies on their Tower Cards. Meanwhile, the University Library is making it easier than ever to borrow textbooks.

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

Over at South Campus, Spartan Football has been practicing since late summer for its season opener at Stanford 7 p.m. Aug. 31, led by starting quarterback David Fales and supported by the SJSU Cheer Team (Christina Olivas photo).

Even before stepping on campus, everyone experienced downtown San Jose’s newest traffic features: 7.6 miles of buffered bicycle lanes on Third, Fourth, 10th and 11th streets.

Yes, it’s confusing but the city of San Jose is offering more info on how to navigate the bike lanes, intended to make things safer for everyone.

Another option is to live on campus. Almost 3,600 students have moved in, including all freshmen required to bunk in the bricks, Joe West Hall or Campus Village.

Over at South Campus, Spartan Football has been practicing since late summer for its season opener at Stanford 7 p.m. Aug. 31, led by starting quarterback David Fales.

Of course what matters most is what students find in the classroom — expect change! Among SJSU’s key hires over the summer was Dr. Catheryn Cheal.

The new associate vice president and senior academic technology officer, she is charged with helping the faculty explore online teaching.

Academic Innovation

Another new face is Lisa Vollendorf, who came from CSU Long Beach to become dean of our College of Humanities and the Arts.

Among the many faculty members heading back with new books is Professor Randall Stross, author of The Launch Pad: Inside Y Combinator, Silicon Valley’s Most Exclusive School for Startups.

SJSU Welcomes 30,500 Students to 2012-2013 Academic Year

Innovation was the theme of President Mohammad Qayoumi’s Fall Welcome Address, an annual tradition held this year on Aug. 20 in Morris Dailey Auditorium (Robert Bain photo).

Innovation was a theme of President Mohammad Qayoumi’s Fall Welcome Address, an annual tradition at SJSU held Aug. 20 this year.

After taking the podium, Qayoumi wasted no time in getting right to the point — everyone’s worried about the budget. Will tuition go up? Will jobs be cut?

What can you do? Attend the next budget forum Sept. 10 and make a difference by voting in the November elections, especially on Proposition 30.

Not registered? No problem! In the next week or so, you should see voter registration booths popping up all over campus.

Associated Students will help people register in person or online at TurboVote, which makes the whole process as easy as ordering a DVD on NetFlix.

And should you have trouble finding your way around, look for the “Ask Me” booths at all the main entrances to campus, a great example of Spartans helping Spartans.

President Delivers Fall Welcome Address

President Delivers Fall Welcome Address

President Qayoumi discussed the budget, including the governor’s tax initiative on the November ballot, and the transformative changes needed to balance the books given the avalanche of reductions San Jose State experienced in the recent past (Robert Bain photo).

Media contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6999

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University President Mohammad Qayoumi delivered the Fall Welcome Address Aug. 20 in Morris Dailey Auditorium. The speech was streamed live, and a video recording and transcript are available.

An annual tradition, the Fall Welcome Address provides the opportunity for us to come together and reflect on recent accomplishments, identify emerging issues and challenges, and review priorities and opportunities for the coming year.

Associated Students of SJSU President Calvin Worsnup opened the event, noting SJSU will begin the year with 400 student organizations, reflecting the vibrancy and diversity of our student body.

Academic Senate Chair Beth Von Till encouraged faculty, staff and students to transform the unanticipated challenges facing SJSU into new opportunities to teach and mentor our students.

President Qayoumi discussed the budget, including the governor’s tax initiative on the November ballot, and the transformative changes needed to balance the books given the avalanche of reductions San Jose State experienced in the recent past.

Unlimited Opportunities

The president also explored the many ways SJSU has made progress in this challenging environment, including the development of strategic and academic plans reflecting the unlimited opportunities for partnering and fostering innovation given our location in Silicon Valley.

For example, Qayoumi reported Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn is preparing for SJSU’s first cluster hire, which means hiring a cross disciplinary group of faculty members with expertise in a specific field. In this case, that field is cyber security.

“This is a time of great challenge, but it is also a time of great opportunity,” the president concluded. “There is still much more work to be done and as budget cuts deepen, there will be difficult consequences. I believe that if we take advantage of the opportunities to transform now, we will be a stronger, better university.”

San José State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

 

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

SJSU Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

In the past, this time of year was when SJSU accepted applications for spring admissions, mostly from community college transfer students, but also from graduate students entering programs accepting newcomers in the middle of the academic year. Beginning in 2009, when SJSU was hit by severe budget cuts, spring admissions varied depending on the budget situation and the number of enrolled students. This fall, SJSU has already filled every spot available to California residents for the entire academic year, meaning California residents are filling all seats supported by a combination of state and tuition dollars. So SJSU opened spring admissions to only non-resident graduate students from elsewhere in the United States or abroad who cover the full cost of their education in higher tuition without state support. This touched off a series of stories in the major media, including the San Jose Mercury News and KQED news radio. Is this fair? Who is to blame? On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend. Listen to the show.

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

In the past, this time of year was when SJSU accepted applications for spring admissions, mostly from community college transfer students, but also from graduate students entering programs accepting newcomers in the middle of the academic year. Beginning in 2009, when SJSU was hit by severe budget cuts, spring admissions varied depending on the budget situation and the number of enrolled students. This fall, SJSU has already filled every spot available to California residents for the entire academic year, meaning California residents are filling all seats supported by a combination of state and tuition dollars. So SJSU opened spring admissions to only non-resident graduate students from elsewhere in the United States or abroad who cover the full cost of their education in higher tuition without state support. This touched off a series of stories in the major media, including the San Jose Mercury News and KQED news radio. Is this fair? Who is to blame? On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend. Listen to the show.

President Qayoumi to Attend State Capital Alumni Event

Alumni Invited to Join President Qayoumi at Sacramento Event

President Qayoumi to Attend State Capital Alumni Event

President Mohammad Qayoumi will travel to the state capital Aug. 29 to meet with alumni at an event hosted by Assemblymember Jim Beall, ’74 Political Science.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

President Mohammad Qayoumi will visit the state capital Aug. 29 to meet with alumni at an event hosted by Assemblymember Jim Beall, ’74 Political Science. The event will be from 7-9 a.m. at Gallaghers, 1201 K Street, Sacramento. Breakfast will be served. Please RSVP to Assemblyman Beall’s Sacramento office by contacting Gillian Eppinette at (916) 319-2024. A San Jose native, Beall graduated from Bellarmine College Preparatory, attended SJSU, and served on the San Jose City Planning Commission before becoming the youngest person, at age 28, ever to be elected to the San Jose City Council. In 1996, he was elected to the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors. In 2006, he won the Assembly District 24 race.

SJSU to Host Economic Summit August 14

SJSU Center for Banking and Financial Services to Host Economic Summit August 14

SJSU to Host Economic Summit August 14

Business leaders at the 2011 Economic Summit (Robert Bain photo).

By Marco Pagani, Assistant Professor of Accounting and Finance

The Center for Banking and Financial Services within the College of Business will host the San José State University Economic Summit August 14 in Morris Dailey Auditorium. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m., followed by the program at 8:15 a.m.

The gathering will provide an analysis and forecast of economic activity both at the local and national levels. SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi will open the event. College of Business Dean David M. Steele will introduce three speakers, and moderate a question-and-answer session.

San José Mayor Chuck Reed will provide up-to-date information on the political and fiscal landscape of our city. Greg Cornelius, managing director at Hudson Clean Energy Partners, will offer insight into the clean energy industry and how it can impact economic growth at the national and global level. Finally, Chistopher Thornberg, founding partner of Beacon Economics, will round up the panel of notable experts and deliver a lively analysis of the latest economic trends as well as a forecast of economic growth and labor market activity.

The event will provide small and mid-size business owners and executives with relevant information to make educated decisions.The title sponsor is Bridge Bank, with associate sponsor Hopkins & Carley, and affiliate sponsors CBIZ, Filice Insurance, San Jose Silicon Valley Chamber of Commerce and Sensiba San Filippo. The media sponsors are AlwaysOn, KLIV, and the Silicon Valley San Jose Business Journal.

 

President Qayoumi Presents Award to STEM Tool Developed by Raytheon

President Qayoumi Presents Award for STEM Education Model

President Qayoumi Presents Award to STEM Tool Developed by Raytheon

President Qayoumi presents award for STEM tool to Brian K. Fitzgerald, CEO, Business-Higher Education Forum; Maury Cotter, director, Office of Quality Improvement, University of Wisconsin-Madison; and William Kirwan II, chancellor, University System of Maryland.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

President Mohammad Qayoumi helped present the 2012 Leveraging Excellence Award to the Business-Higher Education Forum’s U.S. STEM Education Model.

Raytheon Company Chairman and CEO Bill Swanson received the honor at BHEF’s summer meeting in Washington, D.C. Raytheon built the model in partnership with BHEF.

The effort allows users to simulate various scenarios to determine whether the scenarios have the potential to increase the number of students choosing to major and graduate in STEM disciplines.

The tool uses census data and standardized test scores to track the flow of students through the K-16 education system and into careers in STEM teaching or STEM industries.

The Business-Higher Education Forum is composed of Fortune 500 CEOs and college and university presidents including Qayoumi who work together to address issues fundamental to our global competitiveness.

The National Consortium for Continuous Improvement in Higher Education administers the Leveraging Excellence Award, which recognizes best practices that have had broad impact within the higher education community.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Speaks at SJSU

U.S. Commerce Secretary Speaks at SJSU

U.S. Commerce Secretary Speaks at SJSU

President Mohammad Qayoumi, Secretary Rebecca Blank, SVLG President and CEO Carl Guardino and Overland Storage President and CEO Eric Kelly ’80 Business Administration (Robert Bain photo).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

Acting U.S. Commerce Secretary Rebecca Blank came to San Jose State July 11 to formally announce plans to open a satellite U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Silicon Valley.

“This past winter, our Alexandria office had a special exhibit on the ground floor — 30 giant iPhones lined up side-by-side,” Blank said. “Each one featured one of the many patents that Steve Jobs received. As Steve said, ‘The ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world are the ones who do.’

“Today, those entrepreneurs, those innovators, and those dreamers – all of you – are the reason I’m so proud to say that the Commerce Department will soon put one of its first four satellite patent offices right here in Silicon Valley.”

In a panel discussion following the announcement, SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi emphasized how entrepreneurialism has become an integral part of higher education, where students no longer go to “get a job” but to “create your own.”

Qayoumi added San Jose State could assist the patent and trademark office with professional development and an internship program, noting SJSU is well positioned to deliver curriculum in new ways given its location in the “cradle of innovation.”

Silicon Valley Leadership Group President and CEO Carl Guardino moderated the panel, which also featured Secretary Blank, Overland Storage President and CEO Eric Kelly ’80 Business Administration, and OSIsoft LLC Founder and CEO Patrick Kennedy.

Keeping with the innovation theme, Secretary Blank’s next stop was just a few blocks from campus at the TechShop, a work space providing inventors all the tools they need to get started. The shop’s tagline? “Build Your Dreams Here.”

View Secretary Blank’s prepared remarks.

SJ Mercury News: SJSU Helps San Jose Score a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

San Jose to get major, federal prize: A new U.S. Patent Office in the heart of Silicon Valley

Posted by the San Jose Mercury News July 1, 2012.

By Sharon Noguchi

Delivering Silicon Valley a long-coveted prize, the U.S. Department of Commerce has selected San Jose to a get new U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The Commerce Department will make the long-awaited announcement Monday, said Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-San Jose.

“Fabulous!” said Kim Walesh, the economic development director of San Jose, which dangled a 20,000-square-foot floor in City Hall among other enticements for picking the city.

More than 600 cities applied to host the first-ever expansion of the patent office. The pool was narrowed to fewer than 50 in the spring. In addition to San Jose, Denver and Dallas-Fort Worth in Texas also have been chosen for patent office sites, according to documents obtained by the Denver Post.

“I’m kind of floating right now,” said an ecstatic Carl Guardino, CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, part of the public-private coalition that pushed hard to persuade the Department of Commerce to select San Jose. As part of the 58-page application submitted in January, 125 valley CEOs signed a letter backing the effort. On Sunday, Guardino was on his way to toast the victory with Lofgren at her San Jose office. “You’ve got to celebrate on this occasion.”

“A local patent office will give Silicon Valley the capability to deal with the volume of patent applications generated here but will also enhance the quality of the applications,” said Lofgren, who also lobbied for the local office. “Having patents examined in the valley will enhance the communication between the inventor and authors and increase patent quality and decrease the delay in the development of patents. This is a very big deal.”

Spread the credit

Lofgren credited, among others, Rep. Mike Honda, D-Campbell, Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, San Jose State University, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and the city of San Jose for putting on a successful full court press.

Mayor Chuck Reed had made winning a patent office a priority, promising prime real estate at good rates to the feds.

Jeff Janssen, Reed’s senior policy adviser for government relations who worked on the application, expressed caution on Sunday about the final announcement. While the Commerce Department would not deny to Lofgren’s staffers that three locations were winners, Janssen will not relax until he hears the formal announcement on Monday. Still, he was confident because he believes that San Jose exceeded the necessary site criteria, including the number of patents filed in the area and the ability to recruit top engineers.

The city also touted easy access to major universities with strong engineering programs and to public transportation systems, including a major airport. But while San Jose can share facilities with other government operations, the feds’ desire for a place with a reasonable cost of living was a challenge that Silicon Valley overcame with other virtues.

However, according to Mohammad Qayoumi, president of San Jose State, the school offered to create an internship program with the patent office and training.

“We will make sure the patent office quickly has a qualified staff,” he said.

Prime location

The new locations mark the first expansion of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, which is based in suburban Virginia and is swamped with a backlog of more than 1 million applications due in part to 500,000 applications being submitted annually. Today, it takes roughly three years to get a patent approved. An office in Detroit, approved two years ago, is expected to open later this month.

California submits one-quarter of all patent applications — more than half of those from Silicon Valley. For years, reformers have pushed to create regional patent offices, a goal embraced by patent office Director David Kappos and former Commerce Secretary Gary Locke.

Legislation passed by Congress last year and signed by President Barack Obama requires at least three new offices to open in satellite locations around the country by 2014.

“This shows the federal government understands that you go where your customer is,” Guardino said. “When it comes to patents granted in U.S. that fuel the innovation economy, the epicenter on earth is Silicon Valley.”

Hank Nothhaft, a longtime patent reform activist and former CEO of Tessera in San Jose, said he was concerned that politics and other considerations might trump sound judgment in locating satellite offices. “The No. 1 choice was right here in the valley,” he said.

Staff writer Tracy Seipel and reporter Allison Sherry of the Denver Post contributed to this story. Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775. Follow her at Twitter.com/NoguchiOnK12.

Joint Venture Silicon Valley: Qayoumi Sees SJSU as “New Model for Stewardship of Education”

Meet Mo Qayoumi: President, San Jose State University, and Joint Venture board member

Posted by Valley Vision, a Joint Venture Silicon Valley newsletter, June 2012.

By Duffy Jennings, Valley Vision Editor

Growing up in Kabul, Afghanistan in the 1950s and 1960s, Mohammad Qayoumi often worked in his father’s carpentry shop after school and on weekends, learning to make doors, windows, cabinets, chairs and other items.

School was his priority, but few might have predicted that Mo Qayoumi would eventually earn five degrees – four in the U.S. – publish eight books and more than 100 articles, hold top administrative positions at five American universities and be president of two of them.

On the other hand, it wasn’t a preposterous notion, either. Kabul then wasn’t the war-torn city we see today. It was more westernized and education was valued. Qayoumi recalled the era this way in a 2010 issue of Foreign Policy magazine:

“A half-century ago, Afghan women pursued careers in medicine; men and women mingled casually at movie theaters and university campuses in Kabul; factories in the suburbs churned out textiles and other goods. There was a tradition of law and order, and a government capable of undertaking large national infrastructure projects, like building hydropower stations and roads, albeit with outside help. Ordinary people had a sense of hope, a belief that education could open opportunities for all, a conviction that a bright future lay ahead. All that has been destroyed by three decades of war, but it was real.”

Mo Qayoumi was formally inaugurated as San Jose State University’s 28th president in April after a year in office, and he has been a Joint Venture board member since last year. He recalled his upbringing during a recent visit in his Tower Hall office on campus.

Qayoumi’s father, Abdul, and his mother, Habiba, were working class Afghans who had high expectations for Mohammad and his five younger siblings.

“My father was very good in school, but he only had an elementary school education,” says Qayoumi. “He had a deep sense of curiosity. It bothered him that he did not have the opportunity for higher education. He wanted that for all of us.”

Mo took an early interest in electrical and technical disciplines, earning a scholarship to study at the American University of Beirut, where he received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering in 1975.

Fast-forward 37 years. Now, with two masters degrees, an MBA and a doctorate from the University of Cincinnati and some three decades of administration experience, Qayoumi has a unique perspective on American higher education.

Today, Qayoumi sits at the helm of the oldest public university in California, a vibrant but underfunded urban university, guiding more than 30,000 students and some 4000 faculty and employees through a period when classroom space and budget dollars are both in short supply.

“Higher education is at a very important juncture in the United States,” he says. “We’re falling behind in building a knowledge economy. Public universities are raising fees due to sharp reduction of state funds, thus closing the doors of opportunity for many students.

“I see that to be a major issue for us in the race for talent on a global scale. Technology is changing the role of universities and the body of knowledge required to be successful. This is a major paradigm shift.”

Qayoumi noted that urban regions are playing a pivotal role in education today than in prior decades. San Jose State, he says, can be a new model for stewardship of education in building a local workforce.

“More than fifty percent of our students are local and eighty to eighty-five percent now stay here to live and work. They are defining the future direction of our region.”

A collective approach by academia and the public-private sector to train the local workforce for jobs in the tech economy is why Qayoumi lends his expertise to Joint Venture.

“It’s part of building a healthy and thriving community,” says Qayoumi. “Joint Venture goes beyond the political lines and city borders to collectively enhance our economic development.

“San Jose State produces more engineers for Silicon Valley than Stanford, Santa Clara and Berkeley combined. A majority of our students are place-bound, meaning they will be looking for local jobs when they graduate and we need to attract businesses that will create the jobs they are looking for. Joint Venture plays an important role in helping with that.”

“Mo is an extraordinarily hard working guy,” said former SJSU president and longtime administrator Don Kassing. “I don’t know how much he sleeps. He is a very good administrator, so comprehensive in terms of what he knows about universities and very progressive in terms of where higher education needs to go.

“Silicon Valley will find the agenda that Mo builds will be very progressive and savvy. People will appreciate and enjoy the depth of who he is.”

Kassing added that Qayoumi also has a “wonderful sense of humor. He can make fun of himself in a minute and that’s a good sign in a leader, that they don’t take themselves too seriously.”

Back to Qayoumi’s earlier years for a moment. While studying in Beirut, Qayoumi met Najia Karim, another student from Kabul who would eventually become his wife. A University of Cincinnati graduate who began her college studies in Nebraska, today she is an accomplished poet and clinical dietician at Eden Medical Center.

The Middle East was “booming” when he graduated, he said, and he hoped to stay there, but those plans changed with the outbreak of the Lebanese civil war in 1975.

He spent the next year as a communications engineer for a company in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and two more for an international contractor in Abu Dhabi, before emigrating to the U.S. for graduate studies at the University of Cincinnati.

Over the next seven years in Cincinnati, Qayoumi added master’s degrees in nuclear engineering and electrical and computer engineering, a master’s in business administration in finance and accounting, and a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering.

Concurrently, he served as a staff engineer, director of technical services and director of utilities and engineering services at the university.

Qayoumi’s career in administration began in 1986 with the opportunity to join San Jose State as associate vice president for administration.

“I always enjoyed the environment of higher education,” he says. “There’s a sense of optimism about it, a seasonality. Every year there’s a new class, an excitement that doesn’t exist in other industries. The access to libraries, experts, activities and culture – I saw a rich quality of life in it.”

After ten years, Qayoumi left San Jose in 1995 to become vice chancellor for administrative services at the University of Missouri-Rolla for five years before returning to California as vice president for administration and chief financial officer at CSU Northridge. He was also a tenured professor of engineering management at CSUN.

He remained at Northridge until 2006, when he became president of CSU East Bay, where he also taught engineering. He held that post until San Jose State came calling.

“As a university president in today’s dynamic environment, Mo is absolutely masterful at transformational change,” said Dr. Barbara Kaufman, a nationally recognized educational consultant who has worked with Qayoumi over the past ten years.

“He is passionate, extraordinarily strategic, and envisions a bold future. And he does it faster than anyone can imagine considering the normal pace for educational institutions. Mo ran 49 focus groups in three months. People who work with him talk about being on ‘Mo Time’ because of his work ethic.”

A branding phrase that emerged from his research into San Jose State’s impact on the region was “Powering Silicon Valley,” Kaufman added. “It’s something people can rally around.”

Along the way during his prolific career, Qayoumi has churned out an extensive list of books and papers, amassed numerous industry and community honors, served on dozens of professional and civic boards, associations and organizations, and gave keynote remarks and presentations to a broad spectrum of audiences.

He also has served his native country in various capacities, including as senior advisor to the Minister of Finance of Afghanistan and on the board of directors for the Central Bank of Afghanistan.

Qayoumi spends his recreational time reading, writing, listening to music and traveling. He and Najia travel as often as possible, in search of the “joy of discovery” that travel brings.

And he still dabbles in the occasional woodworking project. Qayoumi may be 7,400 miles from the site of his father’s old carpentry shop, but it’s always close to his heart.

SJSU President Names New Athletics Director

SJSU President Names New Athletics Director

SJSU President Names New Athletics Director

Gene Bleymaier and President Qayoumi (Christina Olivas photos)

Media contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, University Media Relations, (408) 656-6999
Lawrence Fan, Athletics Media Relations, (408) 768-3424

SAN JOSE, CA – San José State University President Mohammad Qayoumi has appointed Gene Bleymaier as SJSU’s new athletics director, effective June 30, 2012.

“I am thrilled Gene Bleymaier has agreed to bring his tremendous leadership skills and record of success to San José State, especially at a time when our football team is showing such strong potential,” President Qayoumi said. “We are also fortunate he will arrive at SJSU as we move to the Mountain West from the Western Athletic Conference, a transition he navigated with great success at Boise State.”

As Boise State’s athletics director for nearly three decades, Bleymaier is widely credited with transforming the Broncos football team into a national phenomenon, with a top-10 ranking in the past three seasons. His staff built or expanded nearly every athletics facility on campus, and he added four women’s sports without dropping any men’s sports, noted the Idaho Statesman newspaper.

“I see the same great potential in San José State that I saw in Boise State when I first arrived there,” Bleymaier said. “I am pleased to accept President Qayoumi’s offer, and to have the opportunity to take the reins at Spartan Athletics at such an exciting time. My wife Danell and I are looking forward to joining our four children, all of whom now reside in the Bay Area.”

After graduating from Borah High School in Boise, Bleymaier went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in sociology from UCLA in 1975, where he played football for legendary coaching great and SJSU alumnus Dick Vermeil. Bleymaier earned a law degree from Loyola Law School in 1978, and served as a UCLA assistant athletics director before returning to Idaho. He joined the Boise State athletics department as an assistant athletics director in 1981, and was promoted to athletics director in 1982.

Bleymaier has been recognized nationally for his leadership. He received the prestigious Bobby Dodd Athletic Director of the Year Award in 2011. He was one of five nominees for the Street and Smith’s Sports Business Journal and Sports Business Daily Athletic Director of the Year for 2010, and the only nominee from a non-automatic qualifying Bowl Championship Series school. Bleymaier left Boise State in September 2011, after the NCAA uncovered compliance violations.

“I know people will raise concerns about NCAA compliance issues during Gene’s tenure at Boise State,” President Qayoumi said. “Let me assure you I shared those same concerns. After thoroughly discussing these issues with the NCAA and Gene, and considering Gene’s extraordinary 30-year career, I am confident he is the right choice for San José State.”

Bleymaier, 58, has signed a five-year contract setting his state salary at $220,092, the same amount as his predecessor. Bleymaier will also receive an annual supplement of $102,000 from the Tower Foundation, which will raise funds from private donors for this purpose.

San José State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

SJ Mercury News: President Calls Mountain West Move “Just the Beginning of the Journey”

Mark Purdy: San Jose State gets its revenge by finally joining the Mountain West Conference

Published by the San Jose Mercury News May 4, 2012.

By Mark Purdy

Friday’s big announcement at San Jose State was not just a celebration.

It was revenge.

With speeches and balloons in a building adjoining the football stadium, SJSU officials declared that the school has accepted an invitation to join the Mountain West Conference (MWC) in the summer of 2013.

In doing so, the Spartans will leave behind their former league, the rapidly disintegrating Western Athletic Conference (WAC).

And all this excitement led university president Mohammad Qayoumi to proclaim an Affirmation Of Possibilities (AOP).

“I’m glad these schools and teams in the Mountain West are seeing the potential for what San Jose State can bring to the conference,” Qayoumi said.

And it was especially sweet because many of those very same schools were the ones who totally dumped on and deserted the Spartans 14 years ago when the Mountain West was originally founded. Qayoumi did not add that part. So I will.

Qayoumi does remember, though. In 1996, he was a San Jose State associate vice-president in charge of facilities when the school made its first attempt to move up significantly in the college sports world. With great fanfare, SJS left the very-small-time Big West Conference to join the then-more-prestigious WAC, which included higher-profile programs such as BYU, Air Force and Colorado State.

“I was working on the Spartan Stadium expansion,” Qayoumi recalled. “I went to all the games.”

In jumping to the WAC, San Jose State was joined by several other schools to create a 16-team league that was supposed to be a “superconference.”

It never worked out that way. In 1998, eight of the 16 WAC teams — including BYU, Air Force and Colorado State — decided they were far too superior to do business with plebeian SJSU and seven of the league’s other “new” members. So those eight allegedly superior schools broke away to form the Mountain West. This left SJSU and the other “new” WAC schools to scuffle along and try to survive.

Ah, but now the tables have turned. Over the last few years, college athletic conferences have been shaken and broken as schools have ditched one league to join another — often accompanied by bitterness and espionage and financial treachery. It’s been sort of like the Prussian War, only with network television contracts and water polo.

The Mountain West has been in the thick of the tumult. Over the past two years, the league has been abandoned by 1998 charter members Utah, BYU and San Diego State. This put the Mountain West in desperate need for new schools to step in and keep the conference viable.

Hello, Spartans.

How cool, eh? Four of those Mountain West schools that once ditched and ran away from San Jose State as if it had bad breath — Colorado State, Air Force, Wyoming and New Mexico — are now reaching out in need to the Spartans.

“This is just part of life,” Qayoumi said of the irony, denying any notion of reprisal.

Good strategy on his part. In truth, San Jose State athletics needs the Mountain West as much as the Mountain West needs SJSU. With the WAC falling apart on its own Prussian War front, the Spartans’ other options were not so terrific.

That’s why SJSU worked hard to gain the Mountain West invitation. Qayoumi says the idea was already on the radar when he was named president last year. Over the past several months, he’s spent one-on-one phone time lobbying the presidents of all the current Mountain West schools to gain their backing and convince them SJS is serious about upgrading facilities, fundraising and improving its basketball programs.

“We’ve got to deliver on the entire package,” Qayoumi said. “If any part of your body hurts, you’re sick.”

It surely helped, as Qayoumi lobbied the other Mountain West presidents, that he is a real college sports fan. Qayoumi played soccer as a kid in Afghanistan. And when he served as president of Cal State East Bay from 2006 to 2010, he often drove down from Hayward to attend San Jose State home football games. On a wall of the Simpkins Football Center where donors to the building’s 1994 construction are listed, Qayoumi’s name is on the plaque.

This enthusiasm for sports by a school president very much matters. It means that, as former athletic director Tom Bowen (now at Memphis after resigning last month) and interim athletic director Marie Tuite were trying to finalize the Mountain West deal, Qayoumi was along for the ride at every step.

“These last eight days have been intense,” said Tuite. “But the president has answered every email, returned every phone call, attended every meeting.” And now?

“This is just the beginning of the journey,” Qayoumi said.

Is it ever. We all know the story about San Jose State and its athletic struggles, particularly in football, the largest revenue driver. The university has so many assets — a large local alumni base, many successful graduates in Silicon Valley, a good tradition in many sports — but never has been able to translate those assets into consistent financial sustenance and home attendance.

To remain in the Mountain West, the school needs to upgrade facilities and yearly fundraising. Otherwise, it again could be left out of a party one day. Tuite was seizing the moment Friday, with so many excited alumni and fans gathered for the Mountain West announcement.

“If you’re not a donor, now is the time,” Tuite told them in a room adjoining Spartan Stadium. “And no donation is a small donation. We need all Spartans to step up and buy season tickets. Or if you already own them, you can buy more. And we just happen to have a table set up here where that can be done.”

She added pointedly: “There is no limit on how many season tickets you can purchase.”