Student Success Fee

Student Success Fee Update

Student Success Fee

The university will sustain its commitment to all existing student support programs while implementing a fee reduction for the 2014-15 academic year (Bruce F. Cramer photo).

Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748

San Jose, CASan Jose State University, in consultation with elected student leaders, announced today fundamental changes to the Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee. With these changes, the university will sustain its commitment to all existing student support programs while implementing a fee reduction for the 2014-15 academic year.

“This semester was a good time to re-consider this fee, which we introduced two years ago,” said President Mohammad Qayoumi. “We had very productive discussions with student leaders and we will continue to welcome input from the university community.”

Here are the changes students should expect this fall:

  • The Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee will be “unbundled.” This means it will be split into three components: the Instructionally Related Activities Fee ($147), Course Support Fee ($30), and Student Success Fee ($118).
  • When combined, the total of the three fees will be $295 for fall 2014, equivalent to the fall 2013 rate and well below the $375 rate originally set for fall 2014.
  • This change will clarify the purpose of each fee and facilitate comparisons with other CSU campuses.

Here is how the changes will impact programming and oversight:

  • Revenue from these fees will allow San Jose State to support all existing programs and several new proposals for 2014-15.
  • Athletics will continue to receive support through the Instructionally Related Activities Fee. This was the case previous to the introduction of the SSETF, which incorporated the IRA.
  • Associated Students, the Academic Senate and the divisions of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs will share oversight of these fees.

A few weeks ago, elected student leaders proposed holding a student poll to obtain feedback on the appropriate amounts for these fees. The administration voiced support for this approach. However, student leaders felt garnering sufficient student feedback was unrealistic at this point in the semester due to competing priorities such as final exams, graduation, employment, and housing.

“Students have the right to know what their fees are paying for and unbundling the Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee will improve this needed transparency,” said Nicholas Ayala, Associated Students of SJSU president. “Our interest in the future of this fee is what is in the best interest of all San Jose State students. In order to make an informed recommendation, there must be adequate time for students to be educated and weigh in on this decision.”

San Jose State University—Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees—is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee.

President’s Update: Success Fee

a protest on Tuesday focused on SJSU’s Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee

Administrators address students April 29 at Tower Hall (Christiana Cobb photo).

On April 29, President Qayoumi emailed the following message to all students, faculty, staff and administrators.

Dear SJSU Community,

As many of you know, a protest on Tuesday focused on SJSU’s Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee. There have been discussions here and on many other California State University campuses about success fees, which fund essential student services that would otherwise be unavailable because state budget appropriations remain below pre-Recession levels.

At San Jose State, my administration has been meeting with student leaders on this topic for several months. While the success fee funds programs and services that benefit many students, we understand that the fee is a substantial addition to the total cost of attendance.

We have been developing plans to address this concern, and we will act on two fronts:

  • This fall, we will unbundle the success fee into three components. This should make it easier to follow the allocation of these fees to courses, to other instructional activities such as library materials, and to student support services such as academic advising and technology.
  • Student leaders have suggested surveying students to research an acceptable dollar ceiling for the success fee. I agree that polling students is a good idea and we will work together to make this happen, ideally by the end of this term. Our plan is to take the poll into consideration when setting the success fee for fall 2014. Students should expect a fee reduction.

We welcome the opportunity for further discussion with the campus community, and will update you on our progress.

Cordially,

Mohammad Qayoumi
President

Judge LaDoris Cordell

President’s Update: Task Force Recommendations

Judge LaDoris Cordell

Judge LaDoris Cordell at the final task force meeting (James Tensuan photo).

President Qayoumi emailed the following statement to all faculty, staff and students regarding alleged hate crimes in SJSU’s student housing complex. A website summarizing all relevant reports, updates and messages has been established.

Last night, the Special Task Force on Racial Discrimination held its sixth and final meeting, which I attended.

In appointing this task force, I asked for recommendations that would help ensure a safe, welcoming, inclusive climate for everyone in the SJSU community. It was important to me that the task force and its work be both independent and transparent, and that its membership reflect diverse constituencies and viewpoints.

The task force met all of these objectives. All meetings were publicized and open to the public, and accessible to others via live webcast. All drafts of task force recommendations were posted and available for public review, as are the corrected final recommendations [PDF].

At Thursday’s meeting, I publicly thanked retired Judge LaDoris Cordell for serving as task force chair. She was the strong, focused leader we wanted. I also thanked each task force member for investing time and energy in this important effort. Their honest input has been crucial, and will help inform our future actions.

The task force has offered more than 50 suggestions. In the aggregate, they reflect the diverse experiences and perspectives on this committee, as well as input offered by others. These recommendations deserve and will receive careful consideration and study. We will then develop an implementation timeline.

There are no easy or quick fixes. I am committed to thoughtful, sustainable actions that will have the long-term impact we all desire. We will act in a timely manner, and we will report our progress both to our campus and the community at large.

Sincerely,
Mohammad Qayoumi
President

Fact Finder Mike Moye

President’s Update: Fact Finder’s Report

President, Judge Cordell and Mike Moye address the media.

President Qayoumi, Judge LaDoris Cordell and lawyer Myron “Mike” D. Moye address the media regarding the release of a fact finder’s report on alleged hate crimes at SJSU (Christina Olivas photo).

 

President Qayoumi emailed the following statement to all faculty, staff and students regarding alleged hate crimes in SJSU’s student housing complex. A website summarizing all relevant reports, updates and messages has been established.

Late last year, I pledged to initiate an independent fact-finding review of alleged hate crimes against one of our students, and establish an independent task force to study those findings and offer recommendations for ensuring a safe, welcoming climate for everyone in the SJSU community.

The fact finder, Myron “Mike” D. Moye, has completed his work, and the report [PDF] has just been provided to the campus and special task force headed by Judge LaDoris Cordell (Ret.). The task force plans to convene for the first time this Thursday, February 6 to begin studying the report.

Judge Cordell and I are firmly committed to an open, transparent process. The public will be able to attend and observe task force meetings; there will be opportunities at some meetings for community members to share their thoughts and suggestions with the task force as a whole. Meetings will be streamed live on the web and accessible from the university homepage.

I am grateful to Mr. Moye for his thoughtful, rigorous work, and to Judge Cordell, the SJSU students, faculty, staff and alumni, the CSU and community members for giving their time and talents to the independent task force. I look forward to receiving and sharing their report, which Judge Cordell has said should be completed by April 30.

Meanwhile, State Assembly Speaker John Perez has created an Assembly Select Committee on Campus Climate. Assemblywoman and San Diego State Professor of Africana Studies Shirley D. Weber will chair the committee, which will hold hearings and make recommendations for the California State University, University of California and California Community College systems. I have met recently with Assemblywoman Weber and Assemblywoman and Speaker Pro Tempore Nora Campos (also a member of the select committee) and assured both that we will work cooperatively with them. I am also meeting with other lawmakers, including Assemblyman and SJSU alumnus Paul Fong.

Our own students remain very active, participating in discussions with the California State Student Association and University of California Student Association and calling meetings here on our campus. During King Day festivities at the library, Diana Crumedy and Gary L. Daniels received the 2014 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award. Daniels is also serving on the special task force. We are proud of their work.

I will continue sending you regular updates on our progress on all of these fronts. Thank you for your patience and support.

Sincerely,
Mohammad Qayoumi
President

President’s Update: An Independent Review of the Facts

President Qayoumi names Judge LaDoris H. Cordell to lead a task force that will review all the facts and propose recommendations for nurturing a safe, welcoming, tolerant community. (Photo: Christina Olivas)

President Qayoumi emailed the following statement to all faculty, staff and students regarding alleged hate crimes in SJSU’s student housing complex. A website summarizing all relevant reports, updates and messages has been established.

Dear Spartans,
I’m touching base to share additional information about the efforts to move the campus forward toward healing and recovery from the alleged race-related incident that occurred this fall in one of our residence halls.

Last week, I promised to initiate an independent review of the facts.  I’m pleased to report that Judge LaDoris H. Cordell (retired) has agreed to lead a special task force that will have two goals:

  1. Review all of the facts.
  2. Propose recommendations for ensuring that San Jose State is a safe, welcoming, tolerant community.

Judge Cordell served the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, for 19 years before becoming the independent police auditor for the City of San Jose in 2010. Throughout her career, Judge Cordell has sought to give a voice to the unheard. I am grateful that she is willing and available to serve in this critical role.

The work of the special task force will be informed by an independent fact-finding effort. Myron “Mike” D. Moye, a partner at law firm Hanson Bridgett LLP, has been retained to conduct the fact-finding effort and produce a report that will be presented to the special task force. Moye has extensive experience in cases involving harassment, discrimination, ethics and regulatory compliance.

The fact finding will begin immediately and seeks to:

  1. Determine, to the extent possible, what happened, when it happened, and who the alleged perpetrators are.
  2. Determine when and how the campus knew of the alleged incident, or should have known of it.
  3. Determine how and when the campus administration responded to the alleged incident.
  4. Determine whether the campus or any of its employees violated any existing campus or systemwide policies in responding to the alleged incident.  Determine the extent to which such policies, procedures and practices were followed.

Moye has been asked to produce his report by January 31, 2014. The special task force will receive the report and begin its work in February, and issue a final public report by April 30. Task force members will include a diverse mixture of SJSU students, faculty and staff members and alumni; subject-matter experts within the California State University; and community members.  Its membership will be finalized by January 15.

Let me also update you on two related matters.

As many of you know, San Jose State has undertaken previous efforts to make diversity an intentional, holistic element of our teaching and learning mission. In spring 2013, we solicited nominations for a Commission on Diversity. Its members were appointed in August 2013 and the group met for the first time this fall. The commission will meet again this month and will have the opportunity to consider the recommendations of the special task force in its work going forward.

In an earlier message to you, I outlined plans for a forum on racial intolerance to be held on campus in the first two weeks of December. After consultation with student groups, we are postponing this event to early next year in order to maximize participation. We need students to play a prominent role in planning the gathering, and there is insufficient time to do this now as they are preparing for final exams.

I appreciate the many ways our community has responded in the last two weeks.  Much work lies ahead.  A website summarizing all relevant reports, updates and messages has been established. Please continue to reach out to me, and to one another.

Sincerely,
Mohammad Qayoumi
President

President’s Update: Holding Ourselves Accountable

University Housing Campus Village

“We will re-examine our diversity programs and safety measures within campus housing and throughout the university.” —President Qayoumi (Photo: Christina Olivas)

President Qayoumi emailed the following statement to all faculty, staff and students regarding alleged hate crimes in SJSU’s student housing complex. A website summarizing all relevant reports, updates and messages has been established.

Dear Spartans,

When I expressed outrage last Thursday at the race-based abuse and mistreatment of an African-American SJSU freshman by several suite mates, I did not clearly express our accountability for what he endured.

By failing to recognize the meaning of a Confederate flag, intervene earlier to stop the abuse, or impose sanctions as soon as the gravity of the behavior became clear, we failed him. I failed him.

How such abuse could have gone unchecked or undetected for weeks is being methodically untangled, as it must. An independent expert will soon be named to lead a task force that will examine the facts, our policies and practices, and propose reforms.

Some anger is being directed toward residence hall advisers (RAs) for failing to recognize or act on warning signs of abuse. It is our job as professional educators to help them recognize these signs. Their failures are our failures. We must do a better job of training them, and we will.

If our housing and student disciplinary policies and processes are inadequate or not followed, it is up to us as administrators to ensure that they work, or fix them.

Now, let me update you on specifically what we have done and are doing:

  • Sunday night, SJSU faculty leaders and administrators, including housing staff, met with students in the Dining Commons. I heard plenty of pain, anger and confusion, questions about our commitment to diversity, and pleas to be included in future decisions.
  • As I shared on Friday, the San Jose/Silicon Valley chapter of the NAACP will be on campus at noon today in front of the Smith/Carlos sculpture to express dissatisfaction with pending criminal charges and ask for a full examination of this incident.

I will participate in this event, and encourage you to attend if you can. The abusive conduct that occurred in this case should be punished, to the fullest extent that the law allows.

  • We will continue listening. More sessions with students are in the works and an open campus forum will take place during the first two weeks of December.
  • Additional training for RAs is being planned. Details will follow soon.
  • We have begun reaching out to candidates to serve on the external task force. If you have suggestions, please send them to sjsupres@sjsu.edu.

Sincerely,
Mohammad Qayoumi
President

President’s Update: Listening, Learning

President Qayoumi’s update to the campus community following the alleged hate crimes in SJSU’s student housing complex. A website summarizing all relevant reports, updates and messages has been established.

“This deeply disturbing incident reaffirms that we must protect and steward our values. I am proud of all who marched in support of them.” —President Qayoumi (Photo: Brandon Chew)

Dear Spartans,

I want to update you on our actions since yesterday (Thursday, Nov. 21) when criminal arrest warrants were issued for several SJSU students accused of racially-motivated hate crimes against a fellow student and residence hall suite-mate.

First, a fourth SJSU student has been suspended in connection with this incident. His actions came to light recently in the course of several ongoing investigations.

Second, I met Friday morning with the Reverend Jethroe Moore, president of the San Jose/Silicon Valley Chapter of the NAACP. Reverend Moore and I agreed to several actions:

• Appearing together at a noon press conference on Mon., Nov. 25, in front of the Smith/Carlos sculpture to discuss pending criminal charges.

• Co-hosting a campus forum during the first two weeks of December, inviting community input about racial tolerance at SJSU and beginning a dialogue on how to heal rifts.

• Offering a spring 2014 lecture series on issues of diversity and tolerance.

While these efforts move forward, we are undertaking a comprehensive review of SJSU’s student code of conduct. Our goal is including race-based misconduct in existing zero-tolerance student conduct policies.

Third, we will review all of our practices and policies related to preserving and protecting the well being of students. This work has already begun. I have asked for a report by Dec. 15, and we will share it with you.

I will continue to keep you updated.

Sincerely,

Mohammad Qayoumi
President

President’s Update: Racial Intolerance

President Qayoumi emailed the following statement to all faculty, staff and students regarding alleged hate crimes in SJSU’s student housing complex.A website summarizing all relevant reports, updates and messages has been established.

Dear Spartans,

As many of you know, the Santa Clara County district attorney’s office has filed criminal charges against three San Jose State students accused of recurrent abusive behavior toward a fellow student in their residence hall suite this fall.

Let me be clear: I am outraged and saddened by these allegations. They are utterly inconsistent with our long cherished history of tolerance, respect for diversity and personal civility. The three students suspected of this conduct have been suspended, effective today.

The misdemeanor battery charges include a hate-crime enhancement based on indications that the victim, an African-American freshman, was targeted based on race. I want you to know how San Jose State has responded thus far, and our intentions moving forward.

Our paramount initial concern was the safety of the victimized student. The day our housing staff learned of the situation, the University Police Department launched an investigation. Also that day, two of the accused students were relocated to separate residence halls and not placed with roommates.

A third suite-mate, originally believed to be a bystander, was identified yesterday as an offender. We regret he was not removed from the victim’s suite before today.

Parallel internal inquiries, one based on university student conduct policies and another focused on federal anti-discrimination regulations, are ongoing.

We speak very directly to all freshmen about discrimination and harassment during orientation and at hall meetings. We will re-examine our diversity programs and safety measures within campus housing and throughout the university.

Diversity and a commitment to social justice are in SJSU’s institutional DNA. Our library is named for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; many of us pass daily by the sculpture of Tommie Smith and John Carlos or under the Cesar E. Chavez Arch. This deeply disturbing incident reaffirms that we must protect and steward our values. I am proud of all who marched today in support of them.

I know many of you will have questions and concerns. Please feel free to
contact my office
.

Sincerely,

Mohammad Qayoumi
President
sjsupres@sjsu.edu