Faculty Notes: Supporting Teachers of Color

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Photo courtesy of the Institute for Teachers of Color Committed to Racial Justice Facebook page.

The fifth annual Institute for Teachers of Color Committed to Racial Justice, co-directed by Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership Rebeca Burciaga and Mexican American Studies Chair Marcos Pizarro, will be held in June in Los Angeles. The three-day conference is a professional development opportunity for elementary, middle and high school teachers, founded by former Assistant Professor of Elementary Education Rita Kohli to support the growth, success and retention of teachers of color.

The work of Professor of Physics and Astronomy Alejandro Garcia was cited in an article posted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s News Center, featuring researchers at “the forefront of a neglected corner of the scientific world, building mathematical models for fluids at the mesoscale.” According to the report, “fluctuating hydrodynamics could have enormous impacts in applications ranging from batteries to drug delivery to microfluidic devices.”

Inside Higher Education interviewed Department of English and Comparative Literature Lecturer Leah Griesmann, the originator of National Adjunct Walkout Day. On February 25, adjunct teachers in colleges across the United States and beyond joined the protest to bring attention to the plight of college adjuncts whose job security and paychecks are minimal. “I can tell you on behalf of adjuncts everywhere that the system is broken, and you might believe me. But there’s no denying something’s going on when thousands and thousands of adjuncts and allies say the same thing,” Greismann said. She first suggested the idea of a walkout on social media in the fall of 2014. Greismann recently received an Elizabeth George Foundation grant in fiction and a MacDowell Colony artist fellowship.

Department of Aviation and Technology Lecturer Dianne Hall was profiled in Bermuda’s The Royal Gazette about her work as an engineer and firefighter and her recent trip to Pakistan in connection with SJSU’s partnership with Allama Iqbal Open University. “San Jose State is helping AIOU enhance its computer science degree,” she told the newspaper. “The intent is to train students in remote areas, where literacy is quite low, to do software engineering.” Hall visited Pakistan to train faculty to teach online and to speak about being female in male-dominated professions, encouraging by example women to study computer science or pursue “whatever they wanted to do,” Hall said.

Professor of Chemical Engineering Claire Komives and her team of researchers have developed a new opossum-based antidote to counteract poisonous snakebites that also might prove effective in counteracting scorpion, plant and bacterial toxins. Komives presented her research findings at a March meeting of the American Chemical Society. Because the anti-venom is inexpensive, Komives is optimistic that it will be distributed to underserved areas across the globe, including India, Southeast Asia and Africa, where thousands of people each year are bitten by poisonous snakes.

Publications forthcoming for Professor of Counselor Education Jason Laker include Supporting and Enhancing Learning on Campus: Effective Pedagogy In and Outside the Classroom (Routledge, 2016) and a chapter in Handbook of Student Affairs Administration (Jossey-Bass, 2015), “Unfinished Business, Dirty Laundry, and Hope for Multicultural Campus Communities.” Prior to joining the Lurie College of Education faculty, Laker served as SJSU’s vice president for student affairs.

Assistant Professor of Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging Kasuen Mauldin received an Outstanding Dietetics Educator Award in recognition of her teaching, mentoring and leadership in the field from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the largest organization of food and nutrition professionals in the country. Mauldin joined SJSU’s faculty in 2011. “Effective educators are organized and prepared, professional and fair, resourceful and well connected, and believe there is always room for improvement,” she said.

March 2015 marks the two-year anniversary of a $2 increase in San José’s minimum wage. To mark the occasion, Professor of Sociology Scott Myers-Lipton, who co-founded San Jose’s minimum wage campaign, contributed an article to the San Jose Mercury News, addressing lessons learned from the successful initiative as well as what remains to be done to “undo the extreme inequality caused by the political and economic changes of the past 35 years.”

Professor of Accounting and Finance Annette Nellen was appointed to the California State Board of Equalization Executive Director’s Advisory Council for a two-year term. She will serve from 2015 to 2017. The BOE, a public agency charged with tax administration and fee collection, also acts as the appellate body for business, franchise and personal tax appeals.

The Salud Familiar program, co-founded by Professor of Health Science Kathleen Roe, received a Program Excellence Award from the Society for Public Health Education. A partnership between SJSU and McKinley Elementary School, the Salud Familiar program teaches McKinley students about healthy lifestyles and promotes academic success.

Professor of Screen Writing Scott Sublett reports that SJSU’s RTVF students have achieved national recognition for screenwriting excellence, receiving four awards from Broadcast Education Association, whose Festival of Media Arts ranks as the nation’s most important film competition for RTVF programs. Lauren Serpa took second place in the feature-length screenplay category; Risha Rose received an honorable mention in the same category; and Rachel Compton and Kevin Briot both received honorable mention citations in the short screenplay category. “Once again, SJSU has the most honorees in the nation, reinforcing our dominance in the category and recognizing our department’s emphasis and excellence in screenwriting,” said David Kahn, chair of the Department of Television, Radio, Film and Theatre.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Miri VanHoven received a highly competitive National Institute of Health RO-1 grant for her research project “The Effect of Normal and Prolonged Sensory Activity on Neural Circuits.” VanHoven and team will conduct both molecular and physiological studies of the molecular mechanisms that govern how sensory activities affect connectivity between nerve cells. The molecular work will be performed at SJSU’s VanHoven lab, providing students the opportunity to participate in the research process.

 

Faculty Notes: Research, Recognition and Applied Learning

Ryan Carrington

Lecturer Ryan Carrington, Department of Art and Art History, holds an MFA in spatial art from SJSU and teaches sculpture, foundry work and mold making.

Professor Ted Butryn and Associate Professor Matthew Masucci, Department of Kinesiology, spoke on February 26 at the King Library as part of the University Scholar Series on the topic of female triathletes’ awareness of doping and the anti-doping movement. Their research was funded by a two-year grant from the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Lecturer Ryan Carrington, Department of Art and Art History, received an Emerging Artist/Artist Laureate Award from Silicon Valley Creates. His art explores the theme of labor through gallery installations, performances and site-specific work. He holds an MFA in spatial art from SJSU and currently teaches sculpture, foundry work and mold making.

Professor Emeritus Betty Chu, Department of Economics, was profiled last month in TheHuffington Post for her success in breeding Angora rabbits. One of the oldest kinds of domestic rabbit, the Angora rabbit, along with the Angora cat and the Angora goat, originated in Turkey. Chu holds the distinction of breeding the only Angora that has ever won the Open Best in Show award at the American Rabbit Breeder Association National Convention.

faculty notes

Asst. Prof. Kasuen Mauldin

Assistant Professor G. Craig Hobbs, Department of Art and Art History, and director of Learning and Games Consortium, organized and served as faculty advisor of Global Game Jam, held January 24-26 on campus. A competitive “hackathon” focused on game development, it was an event open to students from all majors and focused on collaboratively creating games under tight deadlines using computers, software and brainwave sensor technologies.

Assistant Professor Kasuen Mauldin, Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging, received the 2014 California Dietetics Association Excellence in Research Award. Her research focuses on human metabolism and, more specifically, lipoprotein homeostasis. She will also chair the 2014 Center for Healthy Aging in a Multicultural Population (CHAMP) conference.

faculty notes

Asso. Prof. Cathleen Miller’s book

Creative writing Associate Professor Cathleen Miller and Professor Alan Soldofsky read and signed their most recent books at Barnes and Noble in San Jose on February 12. Miller’s Champion of Choice (University of Nebraska Press) is a biography of Dr. Nafis Sadik, the first female director of a United Nations agency and a renowned advocate for women’s health and reproductive rights. Soldofsky’s poetry collection, In the Buddha Factory (Truman State University Press), takes Silicon Valley as its backdrop.

Professor David Parent, Department of Electrical Engineering, has been working with Silicon Valley employers Atmel, Texas Instruments and Linear Tech to secure internships and acquire donations of equipment for the department, including boards and chips. Atmel recently recognized SJSU as one of the top universities from which to acquire talented electrical engineering graduates.

Director of Film and Television Production Babak Sarrafan won the Broadcast Education Association’s Educational/Instructional Video Award of Excellence in the faculty video category. His “Green Ninja Episode 4: Styrofoam Man” is the latest in an ongoing series featuring an environmental ninja. “My aim is to make environmental responsibility entertaining,” he said. SJSU students also took home top prizes, including Best in Show for Always Learning, a feature-length film by Robert Krakower. The BEA is the largest association of Radio-TV-Film programs in the United States with 260 member institutions.

Assistant Professor Katie Wilkinson, Department of Biological Sciences, oversaw student teams competing in the American Physiological Society’s Phantasic Physiology Voyage: “Function Follows Form” video contest. To be considered, videos had to explore, for a general public audience, a specific physiological function in five minutes or less (including credits). Students Peter Luu, Lubayna Elahi, Laura Philbin and David Tatarakis received the Judge’s Award, which carries a prize of $750, for “Avian Surgery.”

faculty notes

Prof. Emily Wughalter

Professor Emily Wughalter, Department of Kinesiology, will receive the Luther Halsey Gulick Medal from the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance at the AAHPERD national conference in April. The highest award bestowed by the organization, it recognizes Wughalter’s 33 years of distinguished service to her profession. A strong advocate for girls and women in sport, she previously received the Honor Award from the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS) and served as president of the Western Society for Physical Education of College Women. In January 2014, she received a distinguished service award from the National Association for Kinesiology in Higher Education (NAKHE).

 

Five Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

Five Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

Five Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

SJSU admitted over 1,000 transfer applicants for spring 2014. Admissions Communications Counselor Kali Guidry helps collate all those acceptance letters (Enrollment Services image).

1. Alumna Ranae Moneymaker is a stunt double for Jennifer Lawrence in “The Hunger Games,” the sequel “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” and “X-Men: Days of Future Past.” A nutritional science major from 2005 to 2010, Moneymaker mastered flips, falls and overcoming fear as a member of the San Jose State gymnastics team.

2. San Jose State is congratulating over 1,000 transfer applicants recently admitted for spring 2014. In addition, thousands of students from across the country and around the world are applying now for fall 2014. Our Enrollment Services Facebook page makes it easy to stay on track.

3. SJSU features a top accounting program. The Lucas College and Graduate School of Business ranks seventh among 30 California’s public and private schools in terms of alumni pass rates on the certified public accountant exam. This is according to a Sacramento Business Journal analysis of National Association of State Boards of Accountancy data.

4. ESPN featured Spartan Racing, San Jose State Judo, Animation/Illustration and Grupo Folklorico Luna y Sol during the national broadcast of Spartan football’s Sept. 27 game. Check out this behind-the-scenes reel and join us as we look forward to the Homecoming Game Oct. 26.

5. Kirandeep Deol, ’14 biochemistry, was one of 255 students selected from a pool of nearly 4,000 applicants nationwide for the AMGEN Scholars Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has conducted research at MIT and attended a symposium at UCLA to meet other AMGEN scholars and hear from leading biotech scientists.

Student Assistant Amanda Holst contributed to this report.

San Jose Mercury News: 93-Year-Old Earns San Jose State Degree

Posted by the San Jose Mercury News Oct. 12, 2012.

By Julia Prodis Sulek

SANTA CLARA — Every day for weeks, Olive Chandler walked with a cane to the mailbox, riffling through health newsletters and bills, looking for the dream that had eluded her for most of her 93 years.

Finally it arrived in a white cardboard envelope. Inside, written in black script on heavy paper, was her college diploma from San Jose State — more than 50 years late.

Backdated to Aug. 19, 1959, the diploma came thanks to the youngest of her five children, who understood her mother’s lifelong regret, and a small group of tenacious administrators at San Jose State who pored through dog-eared course catalogs from the 1950s. Yes, they determined, Chandler had, in fact, earned her diploma decades ago, even though she’d been told again and again she was a few credits short.

The degree is in home economics, practical for its time, but one as dated as Chandler’s faded recipe for French dressing potato salad that her family plans to serve Saturday at her graduation party.

Chandler, barely 5 feet tall with a childlike giggle, is a little embarrassed by all the attention. “Too much fuss has been made of it,” she said in the living room of the ranch-style house she has lived in since she and her late husband bought it new in 1960.

But her children know better.

“She worked so hard to get it,” said one of her daughters, Martha Marschner, 58, who lives with her mother. “She tried hard and there were so many obstacles.”

Chandler worked on and off from the 1930s to the 1950s at three colleges to earn her degree, hoping to become a teacher, all while raising her five children and working on the family chicken ranch in Morgan Hill and behind the counter at their lawn mower repair shop on the El Camino in Santa Clara. She even packed off her five children to her mother’s house in Southern California in the summer of 1959 to spend uninterrupted time trying to finish her degree. Still, college administrators told her at the time, she was one course shy. Some of her credits didn’t transfer, they told her.

“She would always say, ‘I have 156 units and no college degree,’ ” well more than the 120 units usually required for an undergraduate degree, said her daughter, Donna Chandler, 55, who reached out to San Jose State in the spring on the eve of her mother’s 93rd birthday.

Olive Chandler had even inquired in 1964, hoping to graduate alongside her eldest daughter who also earned a degree in home economics. But again, she was told she was missing a course. By then, life got in the way. This was a woman who, after working at the lawn mower repair shop all day, would make all her children’s clothes, their bridesmaids dresses and wedding gowns. She baked and decorated elaborate cakes for every occasion.

“I could have got a job as a teacher and made life easier. But there’s no use dwelling on that,” she said. “You do what you have to do.”

For her children, it was well past time to honor their mother’s perseverance. They didn’t want to get her hopes up, so Donna Chandler sneaked into her mother’s bedroom in the spring and opened the fireproof lockbox near the nightstand. Inside, stacked with her children’s birth certificates and family trust papers, was an ecru envelope with the transcripts from Compton City College in the 1930s, Santa Barbara State College in the 1940s, and what was then San Jose State College in the 1950s.

She wasn’t sure whether her mother would qualify for the degree, but if not, she politely asked that the university write a nice letter acknowledging her mother’s dedication to education.

Her request landed on the desk of Stephen Branz, associate dean for curriculum at San Jose State, who enlisted the help of Delia Chavez, a transfer credit adviser, and Lucy McProud, the head of the nutrition and food science department — the closest equivalent these days to home economics. Over the course of six weeks, evaluating classes ranging from organic chemistry and household microbiology to home equipment and laundry and “cooking for two,” they came to a conclusion.

“As we judged it, Olive had earned the degree. If I had been able back then I would have granted it,” Branz said, adding that they used a common exception to count a few transferred units. “I’m really pleased about it. But we did this because she deserved this. These academic standards have to be held.”

In an email to Donna Chandler, Branz wrote: “For all of us who worked on this, we extend our congratulations to your mother.”

Family members relayed the good news to Olive Chandler and told her the diploma would be arriving in the mail within weeks.

Branz awards about a dozen backdated degrees a year, but 1959 is the oldest by far. Most tend to come from the 1970s and ’80s.

The Chandler family invited the team from San Jose State to the graduation party. All five children — two of whom have master’s degrees and one who is a lawyer — will be there, along with most of the grandchildren and great-grandchildren. They are preparing the same menu that their mother so often served for big family celebrations: summer squash casserole, Mrs. Creech’s French dressing potato salad and Mom’s carrot cake with walnut cream cheese frosting.

The diploma is already framed. The children have borrowed a graduation gown they hope their mother will wear for the party.

“It’s getting blown all out of proportion,” the new graduate said. “But I was really surprised. And I’m happy to have it.”

Contact Julia Prodis Sulek at 408-278-3409.

SJSU Memorial Service Honors the Late Phyllis Simpkins

SJSU Memorial Service Honors the Late Phyllis Simpkins

Phyllis Simpkins

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

San Jose State is set to honor the life and extraordinary commitment of Phyllis Simpkins,’46 Home Economics and Marketing, on Friday, Sept. 7 at 3 p.m. in Morris Dailey Auditorium. A reception will follow in the rose garden and bell plaza area outside Tower Hall. Both events are open to the public.

Mrs. Simpkins, who passed away July 7 at 87, and her late husband Alan Simpkins, ‘48 Physics, were lifelong supporters and donors to SJSU. Among San Jose State’s most generous benefactors, the couple committed nearly $20 million to many athletic and academic programs.

The Simpkins’ led the effort to restore the Spartan Marching Band in 1977 after several years of absence. Last year, Phyllis provided seed money for a campaign to provide the band with new uniforms. On Sept. 8, when SJSU football takes on UC Davis, the band will wear those new uniforms in a half-time show dedicated to the couple. Sewn inside each uniform is a label bearing the name of a donor, including Phyllis and Alan Simpkins.

Among SJSU Most Generous Donors

“The legacy created by Phyllis Simpkins’ leadership and generosity will benefit San Jose State University students for generations to come. Not only did she give generously, she inspired others to support San Jose State,” said President Mohammad Qayoumi. “It is important that we pay tribute to the many ways in which Phyllis and Alan supported our students and university as a whole.”

Gifts from the Simpkins support the following:

  • Phyllis Forward Simpkins International Center (the SJSU International House)
  • Alan B. Simpkins Intercollegiate Athletics Administration Building
  • Simpkins Stadium Center
  • Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
  • Department of Nutrition and Food Science
  • Department of Kinesiology
  • School of Music and Dance

Giving and Getting Involved

But the Simpkins did much more than give to SJSU; they got involved. The International House was a personal passion for Phyllis who, in addition to being a regular visitor and occasional cook, oversaw its purchase, renovation and upkeep. Phyllis served as president of the SJSU Alumni Association in 1977. She and with her husband were among the founders of the association’s Santa Cruz Chapter.

San Jose State and the California State University have honored Phyllis and Alan Simpkins many times over the years. In 1979, Phyllis Simpkins received the Tower Award, SJSU’s highest honor for philanthropy and service. Phyllis and Alan Simpkins were named CSU Philanthropists of the Year in 1989. Both Phyllis and Alan Simpkins also received honorary Doctorates of Humane Letters at the SJSU commencement in 1996.

Parking for the event is available in the South (Seventh Street) Garage, located at South Seventh and East San Salvador streets.

Nutrition Professor, Students Win Trip to D.C.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

A video produced by Professor Marjorie Freedman, her students and Food Justice Ministry community partners received an honorable mention in the “Let’s Move Faith and Communities: Communities on the Move Video Challenge.” Freedman’s video was one of just nine entries to be honored in the national competition. All the winners will be invited to the White House and will meet First Lady Michelle Obama. Communities across the country responded enthusiastically to the challenge, submitting videos that represented a broad range of programs, strategies and age groups — from toddlers to teenagers — with submissions from 21 states. The contest was part of “Let’s Move!,” First Lady Michelle Obama’s comprehensive initiative dedicated to solving the problem of obesity within a generation. Freedman and her students from the Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging joined with the large and diverse congregation of Most Holy Trinity Church in East San Jose to create the Food Justice Ministry. The program reaches out to parishioners of all ages and ethnicities, offering classes, educational materials, and connections to CalFresh. Check out more on all the winners.

Four students in veggie costumes

Nutrition Professor and Students Win Trip to Washington, D.C.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

A video produced by Professor Marjorie Freedman, her students and Food Justice Ministry community partners received an honorable mention in the “Let’s Move Faith and Communities: Communities on the Move Video Challenge.” Freedman’s video was one of just nine entries to be honored in the national competition. All the winners will be invited to the White House and will meet First Lady Michelle Obama. Communities across the country responded enthusiastically to the challenge, submitting videos that represented a broad range of programs, strategies and age groups — from toddlers to teenagers — with submissions from 21 states. The contest was part of “Let’s Move!,” First Lady Michelle Obama’s comprehensive initiative dedicated to solving the problem of obesity within a generation. Freedman and her students from the Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging joined with the large and diverse congregation of Most Holy Trinity Church in East San Jose to create the Food Justice Ministry. The program reaches out to parishioners of all ages and ethnicities, offering classes, educational materials, and connections to CalFresh. Check out more on all the winners.

CASA Dean Charles Bullock with Phyllis Simpkins at an International House pancake breakfast.

SJSU Remembers Phyllis Simpkins: “She was There Every Step of the Way”

SJSU Remembers Phyllis Simpkins

Phyllis Simpkins

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

San Jose State University extends its condolences to the family and friends of Phyllis Simpkins,’46 Home Economics and Marketing, who died July 7 at 87. Phyllis and her late husband Alan Simpkins, ‘48 Physics, were lifelong supporters and donors to SJSU. Their son Bob Simpkins and many extended family members are also San Jose State alumni. View a photo gallery of the Simpkins’ through the years.

In 2003, while reflecting on their philanthropy, Phyllis Simpkins told Washington Square, the SJSU alumni magazine, “Alan and I received very good educations at San Jose State. I could try to be very philosophical about ‘giving back,’ but it’s not that complicated — we knew there were financial needs on the campus, and we knew we wanted to help.”

Phyllis and Alan Simpkins gave in excess of $10.8 million for the following:

  • Phyllis Forward Simpkins International Center (the SJSU International House)
  • Alan B. Simpkins Intercollegiate Athletics Administration Building
  • Simpkins Stadium Center
  • SJSU Marching Band
  • Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
  • Department of Nutrition and Food Science
  • Department of Kinesiology
  • School of Music and Dance

“Phyllis and Alan Simpkins understood that everyone should receive the very best opportunities San Jose State could provide, whether it was on the playing field, in the classroom or in their interactions with other students from across the country and around the world,” said President Mohammad Qayoumi. “As recently as this spring, when we joined the Mountain West, Phyllis was a steady presence at many campus events. Her leadership inspired countless others to support SJSU.

“Hundreds, maybe thousands, of students have benefitted from the generosity of Phyllis and Alan Simpkins. Their support of our athletics, band, marine science, nutrition, kinesiology, music and dance, and international programs have touched the lives not only of those who study and work here, but everyone who our alumni have gone on to work with throughout their lives.”

As important as the high-profile gifts were the more modest ones. The Simpkins’ almost single-handedly saved the SJSU Marching Band after its several years of absence in the 1970s. They were among the founders of the SJSU Alumni Association Santa Cruz Chapter. In addition to football and athletics in general, Phyllis and Alan Simpkins generosity extended to the softball, tennis, cross country and water polo teams.

“Phyllis Simpkins clearly saw and understood the value of an NCAA Division I-A intercollegiate athletics program to San Jose State University,” said Senior Associate Athletic Director John Poch. “When the program needed to take the next step, she was there every step of the way with our student-athletes, coaches, staff and administrators. Her devotion to the Spartans was unparalleled. Her leadership inspired many to help make San Jose State athletics what it is today — a comprehensive sports program that thrives in competition and in the classroom and gives tomorrow’s leaders a solid foundation for future success.”

San Jose State and the California State University have honored Phyllis and Alan Simpkins many times over the years. In 1979, Phyllis Simpkins received the Tower Award, SJSU’s highest honor for philanthropy and service. Phyllis and Alan Simpkins were named CSU Philanthropists of the Year in 1989. Both Phyllis and Alan Simpkins also received honorary Doctorates of Humane Letters at the SJSU commencement in 1996.

Services will be held 2 p.m. July 19 at the Los Altos United Methodist Church, followed immediately by a reception on the church grounds.  The family is requesting that in lieu of flowers donations be made to the SJSU International House or the SJSU Marching Band. Gifts may be made online (http://www.sjsu.edu/giving/) or by sending a check to the SJSU Tower Foundation, One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192 -0256.

Picture of a Food and Culture book that has bowls of spices and people of different cultures

CASA Reception Celebrates College’s Authors

Picture of a Food and Culture book that has bowls of spices and people of different cultures

Professor Kathryn Sucher is co-author of this textbook, designed to help health professionals, chefs, and others in the food service industry learn to work effectively with members of different ethnic and religious groups in a culturally sensitive manner (betterworldbooks.com image).

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

Kathryn Sucher, professor of Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging, is one of 15 authors who will be speaking at the College of Applied Sciences and Arts Book Authors Reception.

The reception, 3 – 5 p.m. March 15 in King 225/229, will be the first of its kind and will acknowledge a total of 20 CASA book authors who have been published in the last two years.

Sucher is the co-author of two second-edition textbooks. Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology teaches students about common disorders that need nutrition therapy.

Food and Culture provides current information on the health, culture, food, and nutrition habits of the most common ethnic and racial groups living in the United States.

Both textbooks are intended for nutrition students and comply with the requirements of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, formerly the American Dietetic Association.

Sucher says the most rewarding part of publishing her second edition books has been cleaning up errors and establishing consistency throughout each book.

Her advice to aspiring authors is to start off with a good idea and be willing to learn about the process of publishing. According to Sucher, both her books fill a niche in dietetics and in the textbook world.

With that in mind, Sucher is making plans for her next project. She would like to co-author a case study book clarifying questions in Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology.

Picture of a Food and Culture book that has bowls of spices and people of different cultures

CASA Reception Celebrates College's Authors

Picture of a Food and Culture book that has bowls of spices and people of different cultures

Professor Kathryn Sucher is co-author of this textbook, designed to help health professionals, chefs, and others in the food service industry learn to work effectively with members of different ethnic and religious groups in a culturally sensitive manner (betterworldbooks.com image).

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

Kathryn Sucher, professor of Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging, is one of 15 authors who will be speaking at the College of Applied Sciences and Arts Book Authors Reception.

The reception, 3 – 5 p.m. March 15 in King 225/229, will be the first of its kind and will acknowledge a total of 20 CASA book authors who have been published in the last two years.

Sucher is the co-author of two second-edition textbooks. Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology teaches students about common disorders that need nutrition therapy.

Food and Culture provides current information on the health, culture, food, and nutrition habits of the most common ethnic and racial groups living in the United States.

Both textbooks are intended for nutrition students and comply with the requirements of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, formerly the American Dietetic Association.

Sucher says the most rewarding part of publishing her second edition books has been cleaning up errors and establishing consistency throughout each book.

Her advice to aspiring authors is to start off with a good idea and be willing to learn about the process of publishing. According to Sucher, both her books fill a niche in dietetics and in the textbook world.

With that in mind, Sucher is making plans for her next project. She would like to co-author a case study book clarifying questions in Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology.

Four people with big checks from the milk board.

Nutrition Professor Nominates Winning “Maestra Positiva”

Four people with big checks from the milk board.

Steve James of the California Milk Processor Board awards ceremonial checks to Christina Rodriguez and Father Eddie Samaniego, accompanied by Associate Professor Marjorie Freedman (GOT MILK photo).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

When the California Milk Processor Board, creator of GOT MILK? and its Spanish-language counterpart TOMA LECHE, launched a statewide contest in search of three “Maestros Positivos,” they found just who they were looking for right here in San Jose, with help from an SJSU faculty member. Associate Professor Marjorie Freedman of the Department of Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging nominated Christina Rodriguez, who serves on a steering committee for an SJSU food justice program Freedman oversees. A registered nurse, Rodriguez provides basic health care and nutrition services through Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church’s Health & Nutrition Ministries. She hosts monthly health fairs at her church to test blood sugar and pressure, donating her time and money to purchase testing equipment. The California Milk Processor Board awarded each of three “Maestros Positivos” $5,000 ($2,500 for each winner and $2,500 for each winner’s charity of choice) for exemplifying positivity in the area of health and nutrition in their respective communities. Freedman joined Rodriguez at a celebratory event Jan. 25 at the church.

Students Gain Biotech Insights at Annual Symposium

Students and Faculty Members Present Research, Meet Colleagues at CSU Biotech Symposium

Students Gain Biotech Insights at Annual Symposium

Johann Zaroli and Minh Pham, student researchers in Dr. Miri VanHoven's laboratory, collaborated on research presented at the 24th Annual CSU Biotechnology Symposium (CSU Public Affairs photo).

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

Faculty members and students interested in biotech converged on the Santa Clara Marriott Jan. 5-7 for the 24th Annual CSU Biotechnology Symposium, presented by the CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology (CSUPERB).

“Due to the proximity of the meeting, it’s not surprising that SJSU had the largest number of participants among all CSU campuses, about 56 out of 600 attendees,” Associate Professor of Chemistry Daryl Eggers said.

“Another item worth noting is that SJSU has received more research funding from CSUPERB over the past three-year period than any other campus!” Eggers added.

Eight finalists for the Don Eden Graduate Student Research Award were selected from among the 23 CSU campuses, including Johann Zaroli, Biological Sciences ’13. He presented “Understanding the molecular mechanisms that mediate axon outgrowth termination in C. elegans,” which looked at factors that control neuron length, work that could help advance spinal cord repair.

Nine finalists for the Glenn Nagel Undergraduate Student Research Award were selected from among the 23 CSU campuses, including Ngoc-Han Tran, Biological Sciences ’13, who presented “Optimization of hybrid P450 enzymes activity for the light-initiated selective hydroxylation of substrate C-H bond.”

Ngoc standing in front of her poster.

Ngoc-Han Tran, a student researcher in Dr. Cheruzel's laboratory, also presented at CSUPERB (Ishraq Alsadhan photo).

Next year’s conference will feature finalists for a new competition, the Early-Stage Biotechnology Commercialization Challenge, which will help students pickup entrepreneurial skills as they develop a life sciences idea into a commercial product.

The symposium — designed to broaden exposure to cutting-edge biotechnologies, product-focused innovation and the spectrum of career paths available in the life sciences — also offered students and faculty members opportunities to meet colleagues and mentors.

Eggers, the CSUPERB Biofuels Taskforce chair, moderated a panel discussion on “Biodiesel Fuels from Local Agricultural Waste Products” and “Chemical Education and Green Materials.”

Assistant Professor of Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging Kasuen Mauldin and Assistant Professor of Chemistry Lionel Cheruzel moderated roundtable discussions on work-life balance and “Where Will a Graduate Degree Take Me?”

Eggers, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Miri VanHoven, and Professor of Chemical and Materials Engineering Guna Selvaduray lead SJSU’s CSUPERB team.

Treatbot the Karaoke Ice Cream Truck serves an ice cream cone to a student.

SJSU Summer Food: Follow That Truck!

Treatbot the Karaoke Ice Cream Truck serves an ice cream cone to a student.

Treatbot the Karaoke Ice Cream Truck offers karaoke as part of their food truck experience, where costumers can sing karaoke off a LCD TV while waiting in line (Photo by Michelle Terris).

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

Food trucks are all the rage these days. With the support of social media and the growing popularity of finding an affordable way to have a unique dining experience, it’s no wonder they have made their way to San Jose.

These meals on wheels have evolved from serving their usual run-of-the-mill hot dogs and tacos to an infusion of different dishes: Filipino silogs, fried bananas, samosas and a multiplicity of other tastes that you won’t find in sit-down restaurants.

If SJSU students, faculty and staff want to branch out from the Unique Dogs hot dog stand stationed outside the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Library, a quick Internet search can help them locate their favorite food trucks. Many gourmet food trucks are now using Twitter to disclose their daily locations, unscheduled events, and latest dish specials.

Some of the food trucks to chase around lunch time include MoGo BBQ (Korean-style BBQ), Kara’s Cupcakes, Roli Roti (rotisserie), Curry Up Now (Indian street food), Little Green Cyclo (Vietnamese street food), Louisiana Territory (Cajun), MoBowl (Chinese rice bowls), and Babaloo (organic Cuban), just to name a few.

Are food trucks healthy?

Professor Marjorie Freedman of the Department of Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging says the challenge for food trucks is finding ways to use quality ingredients while appealing to people’s tastes and pocketbooks, which doesn’t always add up to healthy dishes.

“The only way they will sell healthy food is if people demand it,” Freedman said. “They can provide fresh fruits and vegetables, but in order for the food to be healthy, one really has to know how to cook healthfully.”

So although the Santa Clara County Department of Environmental Health ensures food trucks follow health and safety guidelines, determining whether a food truck’s offerings are nutritious is up to you.

Dr. Freedman runs the Spartan Smart Cart, a cart which sells healthy snacks, fresh fruits, and organic items to SJSU students, faculty and staff during fall and spring terms.

Downtown San Jose Farmers’ Market

An alternative to dining at food trucks is the Downtown San Jose Farmers’ Market. The outdoor market takes place every Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. along San Pedro Street between West Santa Clara and St. John streets.

SJSU students and faculty who show their ID at the info table receive free Carrot Cash coupons, which can be used like cash at the vendor booths.

Looking for Summer Eats On Campus?

Read a related story about Spartan Shops’ eateries, including hours of operation.