National Engineers Week: Fuel of the Future

National Engineers Week is February 17-23, with more than 70 engineering, education and cultural societies and more than 50 corporations and government agencies involved in events and activities to celebrate the profession and promote STEM education around the nation. Ranked #3 in the nation among public engineering programs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, according to U.S. News & World Report 2019, and a top contributor of talent to Silicon Valley, San Jose State University will be celebrating the faculty, students and programs that make up our Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering in a series of stories on our Newsroom and social media channels. The College of Engineering offers 13 engineering disciplines with 7,400 students enrolled and works closely with its Engineering Industry Advisory Council to ensure the curriculum and learning experiences offered to its students align with workforce needs.

Mohamed Badawy

Mohamed Badawy

San Jose State University Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Mohamed Badawy is the director of the Center of Power Electronic Converters (CPEC), where students learn about and research how to better power electronics from cars electric vehicles to cell phones to solar cells.

He was recently interviewed in a California State University news story on “The Fuels of the Future.” In the article, Badawy shares his thoughts about the viability of electric vehicles and future improvements that will make charging them accesible. Read the full article online.

His research interest extends beyond electric vehicles. Working with undergraduate and graduate students in the CPEC lab, he is also interested in developing novel photovoltaic (PV) power processing technologies that could improve energy capture in solar technology. He is also engaged in research that supports the adoption of highly efficient electrical loads that could improve cell phone charges, laptop chargers, power supplies and LED drives.

 

 

National Engineer Weeks: Inspiring Women Innovators

National Engineers Week is February 17-23, with more than 70 engineering, education and cultural societies and more than 50 corporations and government agencies involved in events and activities to celebrate the profession and promote STEM education around the nation. Ranked #3 in the nation among public engineering programs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, according to U.S. News & World Report 2019, and a top contributor of talent to Silicon Valley, San Jose State University will be celebrating the faculty, students and programs that make up our Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering in a series of stories on our Newsroom and social media channels. The College of Engineering offers 13 engineering disciplines with 7,400 students enrolled and works closely with its Engineering Industry Advisory Council to ensure the curriculum and learning experiences offered to its students align with workforce needs.

University and community college students listen to women leaders from top technology firms during the Silicon Valley Women in Engineering Conference in 2018. Photo by David Schmitz

University and community college students listen to women leaders from top technology firms during the Silicon Valley Women in Engineering Conference in 2018. Photo by David Schmitz

 

Each year the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering draws a powerhouse lineup of technology leaders to inspire an up and coming generation of innovators at its Silicon Valley Women in Engineering Conference. This year, the sold-out event will be on March 16 with a full day of speakers, workshops and networking.

Erika Lockheimer, then a senior director of engineering at LinkedIn/Microsoft, talks to students at the 2018 conference. Photo by David Schmitz

Erica Lockheimer, then a senior director of engineering at LinkedIn/Microsoft, talks to students at the 2018 conference. Now head of engineering for LinkedIn Learning, she will attend the 2019 conference. Photo by David Schmitz

Keynote speakers include Michelle Bockman, the global head of 3D Printing at HP, and Sandra L. Rivera, the senior vice president and general manager of the Network Platforms Group at the Intel Corporation. Representatives from Panasonic Ventures, Guardant Health, Inc., Workday, Stanford Health Care, Apple Inc., Google, NASA Ames, Salesforce and more will be speaking throughout the day at panels and workshops. The conference this year includes tracks for professional development as well as emerging technologies.

Started in 2013 with support from the Mark and Carolyn Guidry Women in Engineering Program Fund, the conference now has a dozen industry sponsors.

Last year’s event was sold out as well, with 450 community college and university students attending.

“We need you to stick with it,” Maggie Johnson, vice president of Education and University Programs at Google Inc., told the audience during her 2018 keynote address, encouraging women to stay in STEM fields. “We cannot make products for everyone or overcome bias without a balanced workplace. The future is female. Lead like a girl.”

Student volunteers don t-shirts from the 2018 conference. Photo by David Schmitz

Student volunteers don t-shirts from the 2018 conference. Photo by David Schmitz

SJSU students Shivani Parmer, then a second-year student in biomedical engineering; Lalitha Donga, then a second-year student in software engineering; and Cindy Carrillo, then a first-year software engineering major, attended the 2018 conference and were impressed.

“It’s powerful to have all of these women from the industry come together,” Carrillo said. “It’s inspiring to see such support for women in the workplace.”

Both Donga and Parmer said they felt better about their academic and career paths.

“There was awesome energy here today,” Parmer said. “It’s empowering and makes me feel confident of my career choice.”

Read the full article on the 2018 conference.

National Engineers Week: Engineers in Action

National Engineers Week is February 17-23, with more than 70 engineering, education and cultural societies and more than 50 corporations and government agencies involved in events and activities to celebrate the profession and promote STEM education around the nation. Ranked #3 in the nation among public engineering programs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, according to U.S. News & World Report 2019, and a top contributor of talent to Silicon Valley, San Jose State University will be celebrating the faculty, students and programs that make up our Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering in a series of stories on our Newsroom and social media channels. The College of Engineering offers 13 engineering disciplines with 7,400 students enrolled and works closely with its Engineering Industry Advisory Council to ensure the curriculum and learning experiences offered to its students align with workforce needs.

SJSU Aviation majors teach a prepared lesson on aviation navigation to a student in San José High School’s robotics club.

SJSU Aviation majors teach a prepared lesson on aviation navigation to a student in San José High School’s robotics club.

CommUniverCity’s Engineering in Action program is looking to increase the number of traditionally underrepresented students pursuing STEM degrees. Through the program, K-12 students participate in hands-on workshops to learn fundamental engineering concepts ranging from propulsion to product design. SJSU engineering students design and deliver lessons with an emphasis on presenting material that is fun and accessible. Last year workshops were coordinated at more than a dozen elementary and after school centers in central San Jose and at San Jose High School.

Read more about the program on CommUniverCity’s website.

 

National Engineers Week: A short course in Hanoi

National Engineers Week is February 17-23, with more than 70 engineering, education and cultural societies and more than 50 corporations and government agencies involved in events and activities to celebrate the profession and promote STEM education around the nation. Ranked #3 in the nation among public engineering programs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, according to U.S. News & World Report 2019, and a top contributor of talent to Silicon Valley, San Jose State University will be celebrating the faculty, students and programs that make up our Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering in a series of stories on our Newsroom and social media channels. The College of Engineering offers 13 engineering disciplines with 7,400 students enrolled and works closely with its Engineering Industry Advisory Council to ensure the curriculum and learning experiences offered to its students align with workforce needs.

Assistant Professor Matthew Leineweber had a busy winter break. He taught a course on biomedical engineering. In Hanoi. And took the time to blog about his adventures for his SJSU students, colleagues, friends and family in the United States.

“This was my first trip to Vietnam (and Asia in general) so everything was new, and I loved that,” he said weeks after returning to SJSU. “The people stand out the most of all — everybody was incredibly friendly and welcoming.”

Leineweber traveled to Vietnam to teach at what he referred to as the oldest technical university in the country, the Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST). It is known locally as Bach Khoa which translates to 100 faculty. SJSU has long had a partnership with the Hanoi institution — Chair of Electrical Engineering Thuy Le has served as a guest professor there many times. Faculty from Bach Khoa visited SJSU last year and met with chair of SJSU’s Biomedical Engineering (BME) program, Dr. Guna Selvaduray, as they worked on developing a new Advance Program in BME that is taught in English.

“They like to bring ‘Western’ faculty to teach short courses a couple times per year,” Leineweber said. “They extended the invitation to our department during the visit and I jumped at the opportunity.”

A second-year faculty member in the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering and an expert in biomechanics, Leineweber jumped at the opportunity to travel and teach in Vietnam. His research involves evaluating how able-bodied individuals and people with physical impairments move, using the information gathered to design more effective assistive devices.

Prof Leineweber, far right, enjoys a meal in Nha Trang, Vietnam with SJSU student Hoang Nguyen and Nguyen's family.

Prof Leineweber, far right, enjoys a meal in Nha Trang, Vietnam with SJSU student Hoang Nguyen and Nguyen’s family.

He arrived on December 29 for his first meal of pho and for a few days of sightseeing before he met his students for the first time on January 2. Leineweber found similarities between the Vietnamese campus and SJSU–both are set in the middle of their cities and serve 30,000+ students. But Bach khoa’s square footage is half that of San Jose’s campus. Leineweber’s course assistant Dr. Hung Viet, who is a lecturer at Bach Khoa, showed him around the university and helped with logistics.

“I am bringing back an appreciation for how students are the same worldwide,” Leineweber said, adding that he hopes to travel back to Vietnam frequently to see more of how teaching is done there, what research they are conducting and get ideas to bring back.

For more on his experience, including a trip to a village known for pottery, a cooking class and a visit to Ho Chi Minh City where he met up with two SJSU master’s students Hoang Nguyen and Shawn Bhinder, and more on his class visit his site: https://sites.google.com/sjsu.edu/profleinewebergoestohanoi.

National Engineers Week: SJSU Teaches Top Tech Trends

National Engineers Week is February 17-23, with more than 70 engineering, education and cultural societies and more than 50 corporations and government agencies involved in events and activities to celebrate the profession and promote STEM education around the nation. Ranked #3 in the nation among public engineering programs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, according to U.S. News & World Report 2019, and a top contributor of talent to Silicon Valley, San Jose State University will be celebrating the faculty, students and programs that make up our Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering in a series of stories on our Newsroom and social media channels. The College of Engineering offers 13 engineering disciplines with 7,400 students enrolled and works closely with its Engineering Industry Advisory Council to ensure the curriculum and learning experiences offered to its students align with workforce needs.

Ahmed Banafa Photo by David Schmitz

Ahmed Banafa
Photo by David Schmitz

Teaching the Top Trends in Technology

Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering Professor Ahmed Banafa, who was recently ranked by LinkedIn as the number one voice to follow in technology, has identified four hot tech trends for 2019. For anyone who uses a fitness tracker, smart phone, email or other applications, asks Alexa or Google Home what the weather will be like today, or accesses public records, these hot trends have potential to impact all these devices and technologies.

An image depicts the hot tech trends of 2019: Internet of Things, Blockchain, AI, and Cybersecurity. Infographic courtesy of Ahmed Banafa.

An image depicts the hot tech trends of 2019: Internet of Things, Blockchain, AI, and Cybersecurity. Infographic courtesy of Ahmed Banafa.

The trends include the Internet of Things, Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence and Cybersecurity, or as Banafa has dubbed them “IBAC.” SJSU students are learning about these cutting edge technologies in their classrooms, with students and faculty engaged in research in each area.

“SJSU is at the leading edge in all these trends,” Banafa said. “We have classes covering all of them. We teach IoT and we have an excellent lab for that class. I teach the Blockchain class and I show the students how to tap into and use the blockchain network as well as how to create their own cryptocurrency.”

Banafa shares why each area is a boon.

“IoT is what you see now in Alexa, Siri and Google Assistant,” he said. “They are the hubs of IoT future devices and there is a war between the mentioned companies to dominate this market of $1.7 trillion.”

In December, he shared his top predictions for IoT in the coming year. Banafa noted that the number of devices using IoT technology is likely to increase to 3.6 billion that are actively connected to the Internet and used for daily tasks, with their ability to collect data expanding as 5G technology is introduced. He noted as well that digital transformations in industries such as manufacturing and healthcare have tremendous  impact to improve either production performance and patient care, respectively.

In a similar post last September, Banafa shared his predictions for emerging blockchain technology, one of the newer topics covered at SJSU, as providing security a new perspective where human logic is involved at the top of encryption.

“I am really proud of SJSU for covering all the areas mentioned in IBAC with the last piece of the puzzle, Blockchain,” Banafa said. “Few universities in the world teach it. We are in good company with Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Stanford and Berkeley.”

AI continues to gain traction, he said, with the development of “smart devices” including speakers, homes and now cities.

Cybersecurity remains a critical issue, one that is being tackled on multiple fronts through SJSU’s interdisciplinary Silicon Valley Big Data and Cybersecurity Center.

“Just read the news and you will see that we have daily breaches,” he said, noting a recent Marriott Hotels breach that impacted up to 500 million guests along with a Facebook breach that exposed 50 million accounts.

The college has more than 400 faculty members who teach in its 13 departments, many who are engaged in research or work in industries that keep them up to date on the latest trends in engineering, and the program offers interdisciplinary service learning experiences for students.

“Our engineering students at SJSU are positioned better, perhaps, than any other public university in the country to quickly adapt to the newest needs of a rapidly evolving technology market,” said Sheryl Ehrman, dean of the College of Engineering. “Our hands-on curriculum focuses on strong fundamentals to enable development of critical thinking skills that will serve students throughout their career. They can choose elective courses in emerging areas such as Blockchain and AI/machine-learning. Student projects often involve other emerging areas such as IoT, alternative transportation, nanomedicine, micro-robotics and cybersecurity.”