2020 State of the University Address

Media contacts:
Ken Mashinchi, Senior Director of Media Relations, 408-924-1167, ken.mashinchi@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, Media Relations Specialist, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

 
San Jose State will live stream President Mary Papazian’s second annual State of the University address from 2–3 p.m. Monday, March 9, 2020.

SJSU Welcomes Secretary of State Padilla, Other Elected Officials for Election Security Town Hall

President Papazian served as the moderator for the election security town hall panel discussion featuring Secretary of State Alex Padilla and U.S Congresswomen Zoe Lofgren and Anna G. Eshoo. Photo: Jim Gensheimer.

President Papazian led off the election security town hall with remarks about the importance of participation in the voting process. Photo: Jim Gensheimer.

San Jose State University will play a major role in the upcoming California primary, and with this month’s Iowa Caucus raising questions about election security, the university hosted a town hall on the topic.

President Mary A. Papazian moderated the election security town hall featuring Secretary of State Alex Padilla and Congresswomen Anna G. Eshoo (CA-18) and Zoe Lofgren (CA-19) Thursday at Hammer Theater. Before answering questions from the crowd, Padilla, Eshoo and Lofgren discussed legislation they are working on to stop voter suppression and why it is important for voters to feel like their vote matters.

“Voting may be, in fact, the most fundamental expression of our civic engagement. Educating our students on their civic responsibility and helping to equip them to be engaged in their communities is part of our public mission as educators,” Papazian said. “No matter the topic, San Jose State takes pride in its role as a regional convener of important issues, as a public square and venue where debate and discussion takes place.”

“We all remember what we were feeling on election day and election night in 2016. It was the first time we started hearing consistently words like ‘cyberthreats’ or ‘foreign interference.’ That single election year fundamentally changed, in my mind, the job of a secretary of state,” Padilla said. “I’m so proud of Californians because it would have been easy to give up hope, easy to say ‘well, if the election is going to be hacked, why should I vote anyway.’ How will we respond in 2020? Record registration yet again, and with your help, I am anticipating record turnout. That’s how we resist.”

President Papazian is assisted in cutting the ribbon by Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren. The first voting center in SJSU history will open Saturday, February 22. Photo: Robert Bain.

Before the town hall, Papazian, Padilla, Eshoo and Lofgren were joined by Assemblyman Ash Kalra and Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters Shannon Bushey in celebrating the opening of the voting center on campus with a ribbon cutting. This is the first time SJSU will serve as a voting center.

The center, located on the first floor of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, will be open from February 22 to March 3. Santa Clara County residents can cast their primary votes in the voting center. SJSU will serve as one of 21 11-day voting center locations in the county.

“This is an exciting year for voter engagement and an important chance to continue the momentum we have seen with increases in youth voter turnout, especially as we take part in a presidential election and transition into a Voter’s Choice Act county,” Kalra said. “It is imperative that we continue to empower and engage young people, which will in turn decrease the disproportional representation in voter turnout and move us toward a more active democracy.”

The voting center will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, February 22 to Monday, March 2. On Election Day, March 3, the voting center will be open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

San Jose State also has two 24-hour ballot drop boxes on campus, with one in front of Clark Hall and the other located at Campus Village.

Watch the Election Security Town Hall

 

SJSU Welcomes Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai and Apple CEO Tim Cook at Special Dialogue

Tim Cook, Malala Yousafzai and Mary Papazian

Apple CEO Tim Cook, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai and SJSU President Mary A. Papazian. Photo: Jim Gensheimer.

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University was delighted to welcome Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai and Apple CEO Tim Cook for a special discussion moderated by SJSU President Mary A. Papazian, 2 to 3 p.m. Monday, December 16, 2019, in the university’s Diaz Compean Student Union.

“We are pleased to welcome Tim Cook and Malala Yousafzai to campus,” said Papazian. “They have done extraordinary work to empower women around the world.”  

In front of a small audience of San Jose State students, faculty and staff members, Yousafzai and Cook discussed the impact of their partnership on expanding access in girls’ education around the world. 

In January 2018, Apple and Yousafzai announced a long-term partnership that aims to get more than 100,000 girls into education. The partnership is helping the Malala Fund scale its organization by assisting with technology, curriculum and research into policy changes needed to help girls everywhere attend school and complete their education. Cook also joined the Malala Fund leadership council. 

“In some areas, it is very difficult for girls to get to school because of lack of transport. Technology can act as a resource for girls to access schools,” Yousafzai said. “We are really glad to work with a company that can bring their ideas for approaching such a problem.” 

Papazian noted that the traditional approach to educational change is through government and NGOs, and asked Cook and Yousafzai how business makes a difference.

“When Steve Jobs founded Apple, he initially said education is a key market for us. The vision was to get a computer in every classroom. That vision expanded,” said Cook. “Education is a great equalizer for people, if you can fix that one, a lot of other issues fall by the wayside. I talked to Malala about the 130 million girls who were not able to go to secondary school, the injustice of it all. If you focused on girls and the family, the whole family benefits in a significant way. It’s exponential.”

Yousafazi said they are hoping to expand the number of champions and activists they are supporting over the next five years and to expand to new countries. The partnership will focus on countries where the number of girls not in school is the highest, where there is the greatest gender disparity.

“In 10 years, the partnership with Malala and Apple will still be thriving,” Cook said. “We will be touching more people and the 130 million will be a lot less.” 

Yousafzai asked the audience to imagine this room without the girls and women. “That’s the world you get without education. When you educate girls, it introduces equality, giving them a presence and voice in society,” she said.

This special opportunity came about on short notice. Given final exams, commencement and security needs, SJSU reached out to a diverse group of students about participating in this dialogue. The university will ensure that all students have access to this unique opportunity by making available photos and a recording of the event.

View and Download Photos.


About the Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai is co-founder and board member of Malala Fund. Yousafzai began her campaign for education at age 11 when she anonymously blogged for the BBC about life under the Taliban in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. Inspired by her father’s activism, Yousafzai soon began advocating publicly for girls’ education—attracting international media attention and awards.

At age 15, she was shot by the Taliban for speaking out. Yousafzai recovered in the United Kingdom and continued her fight for girls. In 2013 she founded Malala Fund with her father, Ziauddin. A year later, Yousafzai received the Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of her efforts to see every girl complete 12 years of free, safe, quality education.

Yousafzai is currently a student at Oxford University pursuing a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics. 

About Tim Cook

Tim Cook is the CEO of Apple and serves on its board of directors. Before being named CEO in August 2011, Tim was Apple’s chief operating officer and was responsible for all of the company’s worldwide sales and operations, including end-to-end management of Apple’s supply chain, sales activities, and service and support in all markets and countries. He also headed Apple’s Macintosh division and played a key role in the continued development of strategic reseller and supplier relationships, ensuring flexibility in response to an increasingly demanding marketplace.

Prior to joining Apple, Tim was vice president of Corporate Materials for Compaq and was responsible for procuring and managing all of Compaq’s product inventory. Previous to his work at Compaq, Tim was the chief operating officer of the Reseller Division at Intelligent Electronics. Tim also spent 12 years with IBM, most recently as director of North American Fulfillment where he led manufacturing and distribution functions for IBM’s Personal Computer Company in North and Latin America.

Tim earned an MBA from Duke University, where he was a Fuqua Scholar, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering from Auburn University.

About San Jose State University

As Silicon Valley’s public university, San Jose State is one of the most transformative universities in the nation. The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study—offered through its nine colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 270,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

President Papazian’s Message on Thousand Oaks

Dear Campus Community,

We learned this morning about another inexplicable mass shooting, this time in southern California. Though details continue to emerge, the news media has reported at least 12 deaths.

We also know that the shootings took place in Thousand Oaks, not far from a sister campus, CSU-Channel Islands. In fact, several other college campuses are in close proximity to where the incident took place and were likely impacted in some way by this latest act of indiscriminate violence.

There is a gut-wrenching feeling many of us experience when such events take place, particularly when we may have personal connections with the victims and those close to them. It seems like only yesterday that we mourned the loss of life in Pittsburgh and Kentucky after the recent shootings there.

The SJSU community grieves for those impacted by last night’s horrific events. We join our CSU-Channel Islands colleagues and peers, as well as others in the greater Thousand Oaks community, in solidarity, sadness, and mourning.

Again, I would remind everyone about the range of services we offer to students and employees who may feel weighed down by grief, fear, anxiety, anger, or isolation. Those services include counseling and psychological services, and support through our Employee Assistance Program.

Please continue to take care of yourselves and those close to you. Especially at times like this, it is important that we affirm our values for inclusion, equity, diversity, and basic safety for all of our campus communities.

Sincerely,

Dr. Mary A. Papazian

New Vice President of Student Affairs Announced

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on July 2, 2018.

Dear Members of the Campus Community,

I am pleased to announce that Patrick K. Day will be joining San Jose State as our next vice president of student affairs, effective August 16.  Patrick comes to us from the University of the Pacific, where he currently serves as vice president for student life. For those who were unable to attend Patrick’s open forum during his June visit to SJSU, I would like to share more about him.

For the past five years, Patrick has served as UOP’s chief student affairs officer, leading 120 staff members in 17 departments and administering a $30 million budget serving students in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree and training programs on three campuses. During his tenure, UOP created a strategic plan for student success to improve educational attainment for all students, constructed a $40 million residence hall, fundraised $2.6 million for student life, and secured a $400,000 grant for a career development initiative.

Previously, Patrick served in a series of student affairs roles at campuses large and small, public and private, including the University of Massachusetts, Boston, where he was the chief student affairs officer, Temple University, Johnson C. Smith University, and Texas Tech University. He began his career as a student admission associate at Northwestern University, where he received a bachelor’s in education and social policy. In addition, he holds a master’s in higher education administration from Texas Tech. Throughout his career, Patrick has been extensively involved in campus, community and professional organizations. I encourage you to review his CV  to learn more.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank our search committee, chaired by Associate Professor of Economics Colleen Haight. I would also like to thank Interim Vice President for Student Affairs Sharon Willey. Under her leadership, the division introduced many new services, including opening a series of student success centers and launching SJSU Cares, lending a hand to students in need of emergency financial, food, housing and medical assistance. Sharon will continue to serve in this capacity until Patrick’s arrival. Please join me in thanking Sharon and welcoming Patrick to campus.

Sincerely,

Dr. Mary A. Papazian, President