Today-Slide_fbcybergirlz_071515

CyberGirlz Find Friends at Facebook

Photo: David Schmitz

SJSU CyberGirlz program participants at Facebook (photos by David Schmitz).

Thirty-eight middle school girls from San Jose State University’s CyberGirlz program took part in a unique experience this summer that may ultimately be a life changing experience for them. They went to cybersecurity camp at Facebook. For months, students from SJSU’s Jay Pinson STEM Education program taught the girls basic coding and cybersecurity skills in after-school programs made possible through funding from Symantec, Intel, AT&T and Facebook.

At Facebook, the girls advanced those skills and learned more about malware, firewalls and cyber-ethics. They also heard from Facebook’s chief security officer, and a panel of female employees who shared their personal career stories and advice on getting into the cybersecurity field.

Schmitz

Facebook gave each girl a new laptop computer to make sure they continue to hone their cyber sleuthing skills.

Facebook, along with the Jay Pinson STEM Education program and several non-profit groups  are working together to get young girls interested in STEM fields, especially computer science.

They hope to pique their interest early on since some researchers believe girls loose interest in STEM subjects around 12 or 13 years of age. Facebook hopes to keep the interest going. They gave each girl a new laptop computer to make sure they continue to hone their cyber sleuthing skills.

The Jay Pinson STEM Education program is also gearing up for a new year of providing classroom instruction to elementary and middle school students in the San Jose area.

“We feel there’s a need to provide a safe space for girls to explore their curiosity and skills in cybersecurity, so in ten years we see a workforce that resembles our community with at least 50 percent men and 50 percent women participating,” said Virginia Lehmkuhl-Dakhwe, director of the Jay Pinson STEM Education program.

Cyber Camp

Cybersecurity Program Earns National Recognition

Cyber camp

SJSU collaborates with academic, industry and government organizations such as the U.S. Cyber Challenge (Robert C. Bain photo).

Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748

San Jose, CA – San Jose State University, home to the Silicon Valley Big Data and Cybersecurity Center, has been designated a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cybersecurity Education for the academic years 2014 to 2019.  SJSU is the first Bay Area institution to receive this designation from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency’s U.S. Cyber Command.

This designation reflects the important role San Jose State University plays in increasing the number of professionals in Silicon Valley with information assurance and cybersecurity expertise, ultimately contributing to the protection of the national information infrastructure,” President Mohammad Qayoumi said.

The designation builds on more than a decade of research and education at SJSU in information assurance and related fields. SJSU also has a history of collaborating with academic, industry and government organizations such as the NSF-funded National Science and Technology Center TRUST, the Symposium on Curriculum Development in Security and Information Assurance, and the U.S. Cyber Challenge.

Interdisciplinary investment

Several units on campus have participated in the development of curriculum components and specializations in areas related to information assurance. SJSU recently made a major interdisciplinary investment in cybersecurity and related areas, hiring a cohort of nine faculty members across five colleges, forming the core of the SJSU Silicon Valley Big Data and Cybersecurity Center.

“Our aim is to address the critical shortages of information security professionals by creating career pathways into this field for students with a variety of backgrounds,” said Michael Parrish, dean of the College of Science and executive lead of this interdisciplinary endeavor.

President Qayoumi spearheaded the establishment of a big data and cybersecurity initiative at SJSU in 2011. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Andrew Hale Feinstein recently approved the elevation of the initiative into an Organizational Research and Teaching Unit given the need to integrate and coordinate the work of the recent cluster hires.

Competitive advantage

“The federal recognition of San Jose State University and its Silicon Valley Big Data and Cybersecurity Center makes the university more competitive when seeking funding supporting cybersecurity education and workforce development,” said Sigurd Meldal, the center’s director. “In addition, the recognition affirms SJSU’s reputation in the area of cybersecurity, attracting faculty candidates and students.”

Four faculty members played key roles in the application to earn the federal designation: Department of Computer Engineering Chair Xiao Su; Associate Professor of Management Information Systems Leslie Albert; Professor of Computer Science Melody Moh; and Department of Computer Engineering Associate Professor Magdalini Eirinaki.

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,740 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Cyber Camp 2014

The 2014 U.S. Cyber Challenge Western Regional Cyber Camp took place Aug. 11-15 at San Jose State. The camp included a cybersecurity roundtable discussion featuring national experts from technology, government and academia and a virtual “Capture the Flag” competition and awards ceremony. In addition, the week-long camp program offered in-depth workshops on a range of topics such as reverse engineering malware, writing exploits, tactical attacks and penetration testing, all taught by academics, SANS Institute senior instructors and other cybersecurity experts. More than 70 camp participants attended the invitation-only camp, based in part on their scores from Cyber Quests, an online competition offered through the USCC in April that drew more than 1,600 participants from almost 700 schools nationwide.

400 cyber 4

SJSU Hosts Cyber Camp

cybersecurity camp

More than 70 camp participants will attend the Western Regional camp and the executive roundtable (Robert Bain photo).

Media Contact: Rudy Pamintuan, USCC media relations, 312-961-4710

U.S. Cyber Challenge (USCC) and San Jose State University (SJSU) will host a cybersecurity roundtable discussion featuring national experts from technology, government and academia beginning at 11:15 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 12, at San Jose State University in the New Student Union Ballroom. The event will be held in conjunction with the 2014 U.S. Cyber Challenge Western Regional Cyber Camp, taking place Aug. 11-15 at SJSU.

The 2014 Western Regional Cyber Security Executive Roundtable Discussion will allow camp participants to hear firsthand from employers, including Silicon Valley companies, about how to prepare for a career in this critical field, as well as what specific roles these organizations hope to fill in their workforce.

“We look forward to the dialogue between industry experts and the elite talent at our cyber camp,” said SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi. “This is a unique opportunity for camp participants to not only learn hands-on in the classroom, but also interact with executives in the industry and understand the workforce needs of this exponentially expanding sector.”

Hands-on experience

Executive participants include Dr. Ernest McDuffie, lead for the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE); Darren Ash, Deputy Executive Director for Corporate Management and Chief Information Officer, Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Stuart Solomon, Vice President, Technical Services and Client Operations, iSight Partners; and Chris Bjornson, Chief Information Officer, Accenture Federal Services. Other participants will also include representatives from Facebook and (ISC)2. The roundtable will be moderated by Karen S. Evans, National Director of U.S. Cyber Challenge.

Throughout the week-long camp program, curriculum includes in-depth workshops on a range of topics such as reverse engineering malware, writing exploits, tactical attacks and penetration testing, all taught by academics, SANS Institute senior instructors and other cybersecurity experts.

The week will finish with a virtual “Capture the Flag” competition and awards ceremony Friday, Aug. 15, inside the New Student Union Ballroom. The ceremony will include remarks by President Qayoumi; Admiral Patrick Walsh, US Navy (Ret.), Senior VP, iSight Partners; and Karen S. Evans, National Director of U.S. Cyber Challenge.

Industry connections

The camp is supported in part through sponsorships by (ISC)2 Foundation, SE Solutions, iSight Partners, Threat Space, NIC, CyberAces, the Association for Federal Information Resources Management (AFFIRM), Avue Technologies, SANS Institute, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, Department of Homeland Security, the Federal CIO Council, Cyber Ninjas, Kearney & Company, Deep Water Point, The Coleman Group, VMD, Valente & Associations, AMBIT, REI Systems, VISA and Accenture. Local sponsors for the western regional camp include Facebook, Kaiser Permanente, PG&E and the STC-TRUST.

More than 70 camp participants are attending the Western Regional camp and the executive roundtable. Attendees to the invitation-only camps were selected based in part on their scores from Cyber Quests, an online competition offered through the USCC in April that drew more than 1,600 participants from almost 700 schools nationwide.

The 2014 Cyber Summer Camp Series features two national weeklong camps and two statewide camps. The camps are part of several initiatives underway through USCC, a national campaign focused on identifying and developing cybersecurity talent to meet the country’s critical cybersecurity workforce needs.

For more information about the Cyber Camp program and each of the specific camps, visit USCC online at www.uscyberchallenge.org

About U.S. Cyber Challenge

U.S. Cyber Challenge (USCC) is a program of the Council on CyberSecurity, a 501(c)3 organization, and has the mission to significantly reduce the shortage in the cyber workforce by serving as the premier program to identify, attract, recruit and place the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. USCC’s goal is to find 10,000 of America’s best and brightest to fill the ranks of cybersecurity professionals where their skills can be of the greatest value to the nation. www.uscyberchallenge.org

About San Jose State University

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,740 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Symantec Gives $250,000 to Cybersecurity Program

Symantec Gives $250,000 to Cybersecurity Program

GSN

Members of San Jose State’s Information Security Club work with Girls STEM Network participants (photo courtesy of Virginia Lehmkuhl Dakhwe).

Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU media relations, 408-924-1748

San Jose, CA—Symantec Corp. has made a $250,000 gift to San Jose State University in support of Girls STEM Network (GSN): Cybersecurity, which provides girls and young women with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of computer science and cybersecurity, enabling their entire community to learn about STEM topics and careers.

San Jose State University would like to thank Symantec for supporting our vision for the creation of a more diverse science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce through the development of innovative programs reaching under-served communities,” President Mohammad Qayoumi said.

GSN

Looking over the shoulder of a Girls STEM Network participant (photo courtesy of Virginia Lehmkuhl Dakhwe).

This is Symantec’s second gift to GSN, following up on a $25,000 grant made in 2013 to support a pilot program. San Jose State is seeking to significantly expand the STEM workforce, with a specific focus on the recruitment of girls and young women into the computer science and cybersecurity fields, where they remain drastically underrepresented.

In collaboration with community-based organizations, San Jose State’s Jay Pinson STEM Education program facilitates the Girls STEM Network as an extracurricular activity. Instructors with content expertise lead the program, supported by SJSU students enrolled in the university’s Communication Studies 157 service learning course. Over 100 girls and young women have participated in GSN to date.

GSN enables girls and young women to learn skills and communicate about these complex topics while developing strong relationships with mentors. The program also provides opportunities for SJSU students to gain experience in STEM-centered teaching and mentoring, potentially contributing to the pipeline of well-prepared STEM teachers.

Instructional sessions culminate in community events where participants showcase presentations and digital artifacts created within the program. Family members and teachers attend these events, further expanding the reach of the Girls STEM Network.

San Jose State University — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

 

 

 

students on computers

SJSU Appoints Director of the Cybersecurity and Big Data Initiative

Professor Sigurd Meldal (photo by Robert Bain)

Professor Sigurd Meldal (photo by Robert Bain)

Professor of Computer Engineering Sigurd Meldal has been appointed director of the San Jose State University Cybersecurity and Big Data Initiative.

SJSU’s goal is to develop a premiere, interdisciplinary institute in the heart of Silicon Valley focusing on the challenges of cybersecurity and big data.

Meldal is the first full-time director of this two-year-old effort, composed of academic and pre-professional work for students, teaching and research by SJSU faculty members, and outreach to industry leaders.

In alignment with all of these efforts, SJSU has hosted and organized events, symposia and summer schools such as the annual Symposium on Curriculum Development in Security and Information Assurance (CDSIA) for the past six years and the U.S. Cyber Challenge for the past two years.

Interdisciplinary programs

Meldal’s work will include coordinating the efforts of five SJSU colleges and over 30 faculty members contributing to this endeavor. This will involve nurturing the development of new courses and certificates for SJSU students, academic enrichment opportunities for K-12 students and educators, and government and corporate partnerships including an advisory council.

Meldal received a doctorate from the University of Oslo, and taught at the University of Bergen, Stanford University and California Polytechnic State University before joining San Jose State in 2002 to serve as chair of the then new Department of Computer Engineering. Meldal also serves as a co-director at the National Science and Technology Center for Ubiquitous Secure Technology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Security, privacy, and public policy

He describes his research interests to include “the many aspects of concurrent processing, with an emphasis on its formalization by means of programming, prototyping and specification formalisms with supporting tools such as language frameworks for prototyping of distributed architectures and the abstraction mechanisms necessary for large-scale conformance checking.”

Professor Meldal has long been interested in the interplay of security and computing, contributing to the design of support systems for the surveillance of nuclear arms treaty compliance. In particular, he is interested in the security aspects of ubiquitous computing and mobile devices, as well as the interplay of security with privacy and public policy.

STEM-check-presentation

AT&T Gives $25,000 to Cybersecurity Program

AT&T Gives $25,000 to Cybersecurity Program

SJSU, AT&T and YWCA officials gather for a check presentation (AT&T photo).

AT&T issued the following release on Nov. 8:

San Jose, Calif. — Today, AT&T presents a $25,000 contribution to San Jose State to support the Girls STEM Network: Leadership, a program for 120 middle school students to prepare them for careers in cybersecurity. In coordination with the TechGYRLs program of the YWCA of Silicon Valley, this 30-week program matches female students with SJSU mentors to coordinate computer science and cybersecurity projects with local schools.

Girls STEM Network: Leadership introduces girls to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) early on so that they know careers in these fields are interesting, fun and accessible,” said SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi. “With the help of AT&T, we are able to deliver this influential program, empowering girls in San Jose to explore futures as STEM professionals.”

A lead instructor and SJSU undergraduates enrolled in STEM-focused service learning co-teach the course. This arrangement allows the middle school girls to develop relationships with mentors from similar backgrounds. Participants conduct research and deliver presentations to peers and younger students on STEM subjects, including computer science and cybersecurity. The girls also use their research to address community issues.

“Fewer girls than boys aspire to STEM careers, often times affected by negative stereotypes,” said Shiyama Clunie, AT&T California. “This program expands the horizon for these girls early on, encouraging them not to leave STEM work to the boys. By bringing real world issues such as cyber-security into the classroom, we hope to show the relevance of this type of learning and resist forces that drive girls out of the field.”

AT&T and the AT&T Foundation have given more than $97 million to support STEM initiatives since 1987. Projects supported by AT&T contributions range from STEM scholarship programs to science and math focused summer camps for at-risk youth to hands-on technology labs and elite robotics competitions at the nation’s leading universities. In addition to its overall funding of innovative STEM programs, AT&T remains focused on improving opportunities for STEM learning in K-12 education while helping at-risk youth prepare for work in the 21st century.

About Philanthropy at AT&T

AT&T Inc. is committed to advancing education, strengthening communities and improving lives. Through its philanthropic initiatives, AT&T has a long history of supporting projects that create learning opportunities; promote academic and economic achievement; and address community needs. In 2012, more than $131 million was contributed through corporate-, employee- and AT&T Foundation-giving programs.

About AT&T

AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) is a premier communications holding company and one of the most honored companies in the world in the world. Its subsidiaries and affiliates – AT&T operating companies – are the providers of AT&T services in the United States and around the world. With a powerful array of network resources that includes the nation’s largest 4G network, AT&T is a leading provider of wireless, Wi-Fi, high speed Internet, voice and cloud-based services. A leader in mobile Internet, AT&T also offers the best wireless coverage worldwide of any U.S. carrier, offering the most wireless phones that work in the most countries. It also offers advanced TV services under the AT&T U-verse® and AT&T | DIRECTV brands.

Read more about AT&T Inc. and the products and services provided by AT&T subsidiaries and affiliates.

KTVU: NSA Accused of Breaking into Yahoo, Google Data Centers

KTVU: NSA Accused of Breaking into Yahoo, Google Data Centers

KTVU: NSA Accused of Breaking into Yahoo, Google Data Centers

KTVU interviews Professor Meldal about reports that the NSA has broken into Yahoo and Google data centers.

Posted by KTVU Oct. 30, 2013.

KTVU interviewed SJSU Department of Computer Engineering Chair Sigurd Meldal in response to reports that the National Security Agency has secretly broken into the main communications links that connect Yahoo and Google data centers around the world. Meldal is interim director of the SJSU Cybersecurity Cluster and co-director of the National Science Foundation-funded Team for Research in Ubiquitous Secure Technology (TRUST). 

View the full story. 

CS Classroom

Hackers Beware!

CS Classroom

Students in class with Assistant Professor Tom Austin, one of nine recently hired faculty members focusing on cybersecurity and big data (Christina Olivas photo).

The cybersecurity workforce of the future is taking shape at SJSU.

In the Student Union this summer, more than 75 students spent a week building skills, networking with tech leaders, and battling to win a capture-the-flag competition at the 2013 Western Regional Cyber Security Boot Camp.

And in classrooms across campus this fall, nine new faculty members are joining 20 veteran instructors to teach more than 40 courses in cybersecurity and the related field of big data.

The camp and cluster hires are major components of SJSU’s initiative to strengthen the nation’s defense against hackers, like those who made headlines last week by taking down The New York Times.

“As the largest public university serving Silicon Valley, San Jose State must take the lead in providing students with opportunities to become immersed in cybersecurity,” President Mohammad Qayoumi said.

Multidisciplinary Approach

CS Classroom

Assistant Professor of Computer Science Tom Austin, an SJSU graduate, returned to join a campuswide cybersecurity initiative (Christina Olivas photo).

The entire academic team — with expertise in a wide range of fields from computer science to psychology — is working together on research and new certificate and degree programs.

Professors are also connecting with industry, federal agencies and national laboratories on internships, research and a road map for addressing emerging issues in security and data science.

All of this work is positioning SJSU for future certification as a National Center of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance.

For now, the nine new hires, like the vets they join, are focusing on training SJSU students to attack the problem from every conceivable angle.

Here’s a quick introduction.

Cybersecurity

Tonia San Nicolas-Rocca of the School of Library and Information Science is teaching a new cybersecurity course offered to SLIS graduate students enrolled in the school’s fully online master’s program.

David Schuster, of the Department of Psychology has conducted research focusing on the cognitive aspects of cybersecurity, situation awareness in human-automation teams, and perceptual training for real-world pattern recognition.

Jeremiah Still of the Department of Psychology has conducted research revealing implicit cognitive processes that can be used to help designers develop intuitive interfaces.

Younghee Park of the Department of Computer Engineering conducts research focusing on network, software and system security, with an emphases on malicious code detection, botnet analysis, insider threat, and traceback to determine attack origin.

Meikang Qiu of the Department of Computer Engineering focuses on embedded systems, cybersecurity and trust computing, and high performance and cloud computing.

Tom Austin of the Department of Computer Science is an SJSU graduate whose interests include security and programming languages, web security and malware analysis.

Big Data

Michelle Chen of the School of Library and Information Science is teaching information visualization and developing curriculum on big data analysis for SLIS students.

Thanh Tran of the Department of Computer Science holds a master’s in entrepreneurship and management, a master’s in business information systems and a doctorate’s in computer science.

Scott Jensen of the Department of Management Information Systems focuses on the management, integration, discovery and strategic use of data within enterprises and across organizational boundaries.

Read more about SJSU’s cybersecurity initiative.

cyber

SJSU Hosts U.S. Cyber Challenge

Experts Will Convene to Focus on Solutions to Cyber Workforce Shortage  

Media Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6999, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

San Jose, CA, July 31, 2013 – U.S. Cyber Challenge (USCC) and San Jose State University (SJSU) are hosting a roundtable discussion featuring national experts from technology, government and academia beginning 11:15 a.m. August 6 at San Jose State University in the Student Union Barrett Ballroom.

The 2013 Western Regional Cyber Security Boot Camp Executive Roundtable Discussion will allow camp participants to hear firsthand from employers, including many Silicon Valley companies, about how best to prepare for work in this critical field, charged with protecting the nation’s cyber assets.

Keynote speakers will include Ashar Aziz, chief technology officer and chief strategy officer for noted cyber startup FireEye, and Ernest McDuffie, lead for the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE). The roundtable will be moderated by Karen S. Evans, national director of U.S. Cyber Challenge.

Panelists will include Bay Area tech executives from firms with a major stake in the cybersecurity workforce including Facebook, FireEye, Visa, McAfee, Veracode, IBM, PG&E, Deloitte, Kaiser Permanente and RSA. The event will be held in conjunction with the 2013 U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Camp, taking place Aug. 5-9 at SJSU.

Firms represented on the panel sponsored the camp, designed to provide participants with intensive training and pre-professional cybersecurity opportunities. Less than 10 percent of the estimated necessary 30,000 skilled security professionals are in the workplace.

Camp curriculum includes in-depth workshops on a range of topics such as reverse engineering malware, writing exploits, tactical attacks and forensics, all taught by academics, SANS Institute senior instructors and other cybersecurity experts.

The week will be capped with a virtual capture the flag competition and awards ceremony Friday, August 9, inside the SJSU Student Union Barrett Ballroom. The ceremony will include remarks by San Jose State President Mohammad Qayoumi.

The camp is supported in part through sponsorships by San Jose State University, Bay Area Council, the Federal CIO Council, SANS Institute, Avue Technologies Corporation, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, Department of Homeland Security, Heartland Technology Group, JMA, CyberAces, Association for Federal Information Resources Management, Federal Bureau of Investigation, SafeGov, Engility, Cigital, NIC, Threat Space, (ISC)2 Foundation, SE Solutions and VISA.

More than 75 camp participants are attending the Western Regional camp and the executive roundtable. Attendees to the invitation-only camps were selected based in part on their scores from Cyber Quests, an online competition offered through the USCC in April that drew more than 1,400 participants from almost 800 schools nationwide.

Camp participants will gain an understanding of the dimensions of the workforce shortage and see how critical their technical skills are to the solution. They will also learn about opportunities available to them through USCC and its partners.

The 2013 Cyber Summer Camp Series features two national week-long camps and two statewide camps. The camps are part of several initiatives underway through USCC, a national campaign focused on identifying and developing cybersecurity talent to meet the country’s critical cybersecurity workforce needs.

For more information about the Cyber Camp program and each of the specific camps, visit USCC online.

###

About U.S. Cyber Challenge

U.S. Cyber Challenge (USCC) is a program of the National Board of Information Security Examiners (NBISE), a 501(c)3 organization, and has the mission to significantly reduce the shortage in the cyber workforce by serving as the premier program to identify, attract, recruit and place the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. USCC’s goal is to find 10,000 of America’s best and brightest to fill the ranks of cybersecurity professionals where their skills can be of the greatest value to the nation.

About San Jose State University

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,500 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Prepping for U.S. Cyber Challenge

By Virginia Lehmkuhl-Dakhwe, Director, Jay Pinson STEM Education project

SJSU is expanding programming aimed at increasing and enhancing the pipeline of highly skilled cybersecurity professionals in the United States. On April 6, SJSU hosted the first U.S. Cyber Challenge CyberQuests preparatory day camp. U.S. Cyber Challenge CyberQuests are online competitions that test competitors’ abilities to identify vulnerabilities in a virtual network and answer questions related to their findings. Results from CyberQuests competitions are used to select candidates for admittance into the U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Camp. The day camp was aimed at preparing participants to compete in CyberQuests, potentially enhancing their chances of qualifying for a position in the summer camp to be held August 4-9 at SJSU. Sponsors for the day camp include Visa, Facebook, McAfee, nCircle, Symantec, Veracode and the Bay Area Council.

The camp content was led by Alex Levinson, CyberQuests top scorer, technology lead for U.S. Cyber Challenge and head of operations at Bluebox and Daniel Manson, executive director of the Center for Information Assurance at Cal Poly Pomona. Camp instructors included security professionals Duane Blanchard (Boeing), Daniel Blander (owns and runs two companies focused on security consulting and security awareness), Joshua Chin (one of the founders of Net Force) and Kyle Osborne (Tesla).

Speakers included the SJSU College of Science Dean Michael Parrish and President Mohammad Qayoumi. Nearly 70 students and professionals participated in the day’s activities and discussions. All are encouraged to compete for a position in the U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Camp, where participants will work with leading SANS instructors to learn how to evaluate network security and gain firsthand experience detecting intrusions through simulated attacks. Participants will also have the opportunity to engage with major technology companies and government agencies at a job fair.

 

 

 

Intel Makes $25,000 Gift to Girls STEM Network

Intel Makes $25,000 Gift to Girls STEM Network

Intel Makes $25,000 Gift to Girls STEM Network

Virginia Lehmkuhi-Dakhwe, director of the Jay Pinson STEM Education project, speaks at a cybersecurity event (Robert Bain photo).

Intel Corp. has made a $25,000 lead gift to a new SJSU initiative aimed at introducing middle-school girls to cybersecurity.

“We are extremely grateful for Intel’s partnership and willingness to support this program,” said Virginia Lehmkuhi-Dakhwe, director of the Jay Pinson STEM Education project within the College of Science.

The initiative, “Girls STEM Network: Cybersecurity,” or GSN:Cyber, will help middle-school girls learn how to protect the online environments of their families and communities.

At the same time, the program will enhance the girls’  knowledge of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects.

San Jose State will provide training and support for SJSU students and community organization leaders, who will in turn help participating girls develop a deeper understanding of the risks of cyberspace. The experience will also encourage girls to consider careers in computer science and cybersecurity.

GSN: Cyber will leverage the expertise of SJSU faculty and staff members, campus infrastructure and strategic partnerships with industry and community organizations serving girls and women. The program will operate at SJSU and in after-school programs, reaching 180 girls and 18 SJSU student instructors in its first year of operation.

50-mo-thumb

Homeland Security Appointment for President Qayoumi

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, pat.harris@sjsu.edu, 408-656-6999

Washington, D.C.
– U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano today announced the appointment of Mohammad H. Qayoumi, president of San Jose State University, to the Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council (HSAAC). The HSAAC, comprised of prominent university presidents and academic leaders, is charged with advising the secretary and senior leadership at the department on several key issues.

“Dr. Qayoumi’s extensive experience and expertise will make him a valuable asset to the council,” said Secretary Napolitano. “I look forward to working with him on these critical issues.”

In this noteworthy role, Qayoumi will provide advice and recommendations on issues related to student and recent graduate recruitment; international students; academic research and faculty exchange; campus resilience; and homeland security academic programs. Qayoumi will also serve as chair of the HSAAC’s new subcommittee on cybersecurity, which will advise on the department’s cybersecurity recruitment and workforce education efforts.

“The mission of the Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council reflects San Jose State’s role as the leading public university powering Silicon Valley,” Qayoumi said. “Among our priorities are attracting the brightest minds to our campus, where we provide academic and pre-professional opportunities to the tech industry workforce of the future.”

Qayoumi is spearheading plans for one of the nation’s first university-based cybersecurity center, which will take a cross-disciplinary approach to workforce development. By fall 2013, San Jose State will hire a cluster of tenure-track faculty members to focus on this endeavor. SJSU will host the U.S. Cyber Challenge Western Regional Summer Cyber Camp for the second consecutive year.

About Qayoumi

Qayoumi holds a bachelor’s in electrical engineering from the American University of Beirut and four degrees from the University of Cincinnati: a master’s in nuclear engineering, a master’s in electrical and computer engineering, an MBA and a doctorate in electrical engineering.

He has more than 32 years of engineering and administrative experience in several universities.  He served as president of California State University East Bay from 2006 to 2011. He came to Cal State East Bay from California State University Northridge, where he served as vice president for administration and finance and chief financial officer from 2000 to 2006, and was also a tenured professor of engineering management.

Qayoumi has served his native country in various financial capacities. He was the senior advisor to the minister of finance of Afghanistan from 2002 to 2005 and served on the board of directors for the Central Bank of Afghanistan from 2003 to 2006.

San Jose State University — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

SJSU Hosts 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp

SJSU Hosts Cyber Quests Day Camp

SJSU Hosts 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp

Participants of the day camp will learn key skills required to score well in the April 2013 Cyber Quests Qualification Competition (Robert Bain photo).

Contacts for reporters:
Rudy Pamintuan, USCC Media Relations, 312-961-4710
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, 408-656-6999

The U.S. Cyber Challenge has announced the date and details of the 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp. The day camp will take place on Saturday, April 6 at San Jose State University beginning at 9 a.m. and concluding at 5 p.m. To learn more information and register for the 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp, visit www.sjsu.edu/cybersecurity.

“As the largest public university serving Silicon Valley, San Jose State must take the lead in providing students with opportunities to become immersed in cyber security, a top international issue,” said SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi. “San Jose State is pleased to collaborate with the U.S. Cyber Challenge to develop programs attracting the brightest minds to one of the most critical emerging fields of our time.”

Participants of the day camp will learn key skills required to score well in the April 2013 Cyber Quests Qualification Competition. Presentations may include introductions to Wireshark and web application and database security, securing network services, network discovery methods and a host of other topics. Sponsors of the 2013 Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp include Visa and the Bay Area Council.

“We are very proud to host our first Cyber Quests Preparatory Day Camp,” stated Karen S. Evans, National Director of U.S. Cyber Challenge. “We believe that equipping students with the knowledge and skills to do well in the Cyber Quests online competition will lead to more students being invited to our Summer Cyber Camps and ultimately exponential growth in the capacity of our professional workforce in cyber security.”

Participants are required to be 18 years or older. There are no specific credentials or skills required to attend the day camp, although camp content will be quite technical and will require some background in computer science. Admission is free, but spots are limited. Therefore, it is suggested to register as soon as possible before the camp is filled to capacity.

Cyber Quests is an online cybersecurity competition operated by Cyber Aces. Top scorers earn an invitation to the U.S. Cyber Challenge Western Regional Summer Cyber Camp to be held at SJSU in August 2013. The Cyber Quests competition will open on April 16 and end on April 30. Registration begins on March 29. To register, visit USCC.CyberQuests.org.

About San Jose State University

San Jose State – Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,500 students and 3,850 employees – is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

About U.S. Cyber Challenge

The mission of the U.S. Cyber Challenge (USCC) is to significantly reduce the shortage in the cyber workforce by serving as the premier program to identify, attract, recruit and place the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. USCC’s goal is to find 10,000 of America’s best and brightest to fill the ranks of cybersecurity professionals where their skills can be of the greatest value to the nation.

About the National Board of Information Security Examiners

The mission of the National Board of Information Security Examiners (NBISE) is to increase the security of information networks, computing systems, and industrial and military technology by improving the potential and performance of the cyber security workforce.

About CyberAces

The mission of CyberAces is to identify, enable and encourage young Americans with high aptitude for technical achievement in information security to discover their talents, develop their passion, and determine where their talent can be nurtured so they can make a major contribution to the physical and economic security of the US and its enterprises.The CyberAces foundation achieves its mission by offering challenging and realistic cybersecurity competitions, training camps and educational initiatives through which high school, college students and young professionals develop the practical skills needed to excel as cybersecurity practitioners and to become highly valued citizen-technologists.

ed-oates-slideshow

Security in the Cyber Age

A discussion panel of industry professionals are sitting in chairs at a table on a stage

Speakers in the The Employment Landscape (left to right): Mark Iwanowski, Vice President Cognizant Technology; John Serafini, Director of National Labs at Allied Minds; Tami Gallupe, Director, Global Privacy & North America Information Security at Oracle, Nathan Nayman, Head of State & Local Relations at VISA, and Stephanie Sparks, Business & Intellectual Property Litigation Lawyer for Hoge Fenton Jones & Appel Law (Robert Bain photo).

By: Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

Are you interested in entering a field that has zero unemployment and endless opportunity? In a new effort to highlight a huge shortage of skilled workers in IT security, SJSU hosted the Edward Oates Symposium on Security in the Cyber Age Sept. 14 at the Student Union.

The one-day forum, sponsored by the College of Science and Ed Oates, alumnus and co-founder of Oracle, was intended to bring to light how SJSU can play a significant role in workforce development and educational training for cybersecurity.

“With this symposium, we hoped to achieve an increased awareness and sense of urgency in how important our role at SJSU is in preparing students in this critical STEM and interdisciplinary curricula and program,” said Director of Development Carol Beattie, who helped organize the event.

The event’s 300 participants included SJSU students, faculty, staff, and administrators, in addition to representatives from the private sector, government and higher education.

Panel discussions focused on the threats and roles of cybersecurity, as well as higher education’s contributions and employment opportunities in this emerging field.

Employment Landscape Panel Discussion

The symposium concluded with an employment landscape panel discussion probing insightful questions from the audience including: Who benefits from policy risks? What kinds of expertise and training are needed?  What are the first steps in setting curriculum for a discipline in cyber security?

President Mohammad Qayoumi provided closing comments, focusing on SJSU efforts to develop a program for cybersecurity training and certification in Silicon Valley. Qayoumi listed the corporate environment, the law, psychology, education and licensing as just a few aspects of an interdisciplinary approach to workforce development.

“We have to be a part of providing basic knowledge to kids down to the K-6 grade levels,” Qayoumi said. “Cybersecurity hygiene will become one of those survival skills that each and everyone of us needs to have.”

Qayoumi is working with the Bay Area Council on implementing infrastructure for SJSU’s planned Center for Security in the Cyber Age. Programs would include high school camps and community colleges programs, as well as graduate degrees and partnerships with corporations in Silicon Valley.

SJSU Hosts Edward Oates Symposium on Security in the Cyber Age

SJSU Hosts Edward Oates Symposium on Security in the Cyber Age

A discussion panel of industry professionals are sitting in chairs at a table on a stage

Speakers in the The Employment Landscape (left to right): Mark Iwanowski, Vice President Cognizant Technology; John Serafini, Director of National Labs at Allied Minds; Tami Gallupe, Director, Global Privacy & North America Information Security at Oracle, Nathan Nayman, Head of State & Local Relations at VISA, and Stephanie Sparks, Business & Intellectual Property Litigation Lawyer for Hoge Fenton Jones & Appel Law (Robert Bain photo).

By: Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

Are you interested in entering a field that has zero unemployment and endless opportunity? In a new effort to highlight a huge shortage of skilled workers in IT security, SJSU hosted the Edward Oates Symposium on Security in the Cyber Age Sept. 14 at the Student Union.

The one-day forum, sponsored by the College of Science and Ed Oates, alumnus and co-founder of Oracle, was intended to bring to light how SJSU can play a significant role in workforce development and educational training for cybersecurity.

“With this symposium, we hoped to achieve an increased awareness and sense of urgency in how important our role at SJSU is in preparing students in this critical STEM and interdisciplinary curricula and program,” said Director of Development Carol Beattie, who helped organize the event.

The event’s 300 participants included SJSU students, faculty, staff, and administrators, in addition to representatives from the private sector, government and higher education.

Panel discussions focused on the threats and roles of cybersecurity, as well as higher education’s contributions and employment opportunities in this emerging field.

Employment Landscape Panel Discussion

The symposium concluded with an employment landscape panel discussion probing insightful questions from the audience including: Who benefits from policy risks? What kinds of expertise and training are needed?  What are the first steps in setting curriculum for a discipline in cyber security?

President Mohammad Qayoumi provided closing comments, focusing on SJSU efforts to develop a program for cybersecurity training and certification in Silicon Valley. Qayoumi listed the corporate environment, the law, psychology, education and licensing as just a few aspects of an interdisciplinary approach to workforce development.

“We have to be a part of providing basic knowledge to kids down to the K-6 grade levels,” Qayoumi said. “Cybersecurity hygiene will become one of those survival skills that each and everyone of us needs to have.”

Qayoumi is working with the Bay Area Council on implementing infrastructure for SJSU’s planned Center for Security in the Cyber Age. Programs would include high school camps and community colleges programs, as well as graduate degrees and partnerships with corporations in Silicon Valley.

7833993274_8c5f4391fa-2g90shx-198x300

President Delivers Fall Welcome Address

President Delivers Fall Welcome Address

President Qayoumi discussed the budget, including the governor’s tax initiative on the November ballot, and the transformative changes needed to balance the books given the avalanche of reductions San Jose State experienced in the recent past (Robert Bain photo).

Media contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6999

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University President Mohammad Qayoumi delivered the Fall Welcome Address Aug. 20 in Morris Dailey Auditorium. The speech was streamed live, and a video recording and transcript are available.

An annual tradition, the Fall Welcome Address provides the opportunity for us to come together and reflect on recent accomplishments, identify emerging issues and challenges, and review priorities and opportunities for the coming year.

Associated Students of SJSU President Calvin Worsnup opened the event, noting SJSU will begin the year with 400 student organizations, reflecting the vibrancy and diversity of our student body.

Academic Senate Chair Beth Von Till encouraged faculty, staff and students to transform the unanticipated challenges facing SJSU into new opportunities to teach and mentor our students.

President Qayoumi discussed the budget, including the governor’s tax initiative on the November ballot, and the transformative changes needed to balance the books given the avalanche of reductions San Jose State experienced in the recent past.

Unlimited Opportunities

The president also explored the many ways SJSU has made progress in this challenging environment, including the development of strategic and academic plans reflecting the unlimited opportunities for partnering and fostering innovation given our location in Silicon Valley.

For example, Qayoumi reported Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn is preparing for SJSU’s first cluster hire, which means hiring a cross disciplinary group of faculty members with expertise in a specific field. In this case, that field is cyber security.

“This is a time of great challenge, but it is also a time of great opportunity,” the president concluded. “There is still much more work to be done and as budget cuts deepen, there will be difficult consequences. I believe that if we take advantage of the opportunities to transform now, we will be a stronger, better university.”

San José State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

 

"Capture The Flag" Wraps Up 2012 U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Boot Camp

"Capture The Flag" Wraps Up 2012 U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Boot Camp

"Capture The Flag" Competition Wraps Up 2012 U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Boot Camp

A three-and-a-half hour time crunch and heart-pumping trance music playing in the background was not enough to thwart members from the winning team, 1stworldproblems (Robert Bain photo).

By Amanda Holst, Pubic Affairs Assistant

Forty-six campers, ages 18 to 40, competed Aug. 10 in the “Capture the Flag” competition, wrapping up the U.S. Cyber Challenge Northern California Cyber Security Summer Boot Camp.

Contestants, working in teams of threes and fours, raced to hack into nine servers, using individual skill sets and what they learned at camp to capture files, passwords or any other flags containing secure information.

A three-and-a-half hour time crunch and heart-pumping trance music playing in the background was not enough to thwart members from the winning team, 1stworldproblems.

“There were a number of instances where we went a while without accomplishing anything,” said Cal State San Bernardino computer science senior Paul Cummings. “Our approach was to try not to stress out and try to look at things in a different way.”

The camp was supported in part through sponsorships with Juniper, Avue Technologies, Safegov.org and partnerships with SANS Institute, Booz Allen Hamilton, and San Jose State University.  Local sponsors include Facebook, McAfee, nCircle, Symantec, Veracode and Visa.

The objective of the penetration exercise, arranged and monitored by the U.S. Cyber Challenge, was more than taking over target machines.

“It’s a test to assimilate and test the vulnerabilities of a system,” Teaching Assistant Alex Levinson said.

“Shake In Your Pants Factor”

According to Levinson, the purpose of the competition was to get rid of the “shake in your pants factor” in order to offer preparedness for real-life work experiences.

Top SANS Institute instructors and other cyber-security experts in the field taught classes for the week. Topics included forensics, security testing and vulnerability assessment.

Jordan Jennings, ’12 Computer Science’, was one of two students representing SJSU in the competition.

“It was nice to be exposed to the competition and have an idea of what it might be like in the future if I wanted to” pursue cyber security work, Jennings said.

Cyber security consortium ISC2 awarded each of the capture-the-flag winners $1,000 scholarships.

 

Two young men wearing ties and collared shirtschat during the Cyber Challenge job fair.

SJSU Represents the West, Hosts 2012 U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Boot Camp

By Amanda Holst, Public Affairs Assistant

Two young men wearing ties and collared shirtschat during the Cyber Challenge job fair.

U.S. Cyber Challenge Summer Cyber Security Boot Camp participants attend a job fair during the week-long camp (Christina Olivas photo).

As a part of a larger effort to supply Silicon Valley and the nation with much-needed cybersecurity professionals, SJSU is hosting the 2012 U.S. Cyber Challenge Northern California Cyber Security Summer Boot Camp August 6-10.

“It’s a great opportunity to get involved in this early exposure in an industry that is going to have explosive growth,” said Rudy Pamintuan, a spokesperson for the U.S. Cyber Challenge (USCC).

The camp was supported in part through sponsorships with Juniper, Avue Technologies, Safegov.org and partnerships with SANS Institute, Booz Allen Hamilton, and San Jose State University.  Local sponsors include Facebook, McAfee, nCircle, Symantec, Veracode and Visa.

Events are focused on the goal of finding the next generation of the “best and brightest” cybersecurity experts throughout the U.S. This week, campers receiving the highest scores from April’s online Cyber Quest Cyber Challenge competition, hosted by (USCC), and various other Cyber Challenge competitions held throughout the U.S., have been invited to experience hands-on information security training through in-depth workshops taught by top security instructors at SANS Institute and other experts in the field.

To address the gap of the shortage of skilled security professionals in the workplace, an Executive Roundtable was held August 7 at the Student Union in the Umunhum Room in conjunction with the camp.

Speakers included Ernest McDuffie, lead for the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE), Keith Tresh, California director and chief information security officer, and various national cybersecurity industry professionals.

The Executive Round Table

On August 7, President Qayoumi welcomed the 2012 California Regional Cyber Security Boot Camp Round Table Discussion, which featured national experts from government, technology and academia.

“The future of our country will be up to individuals like you,” Qayoumi told campers, addressing the current need for security professionals in the workplace.

McDuffie spoke on current national cybersecurity efforts and initiatives, including the standards for training and forming the framework for emerging skill sets and job titles. In addition, he stressed the importance of forming public partnerships with academia and industry.

“The cybersecurity issue is so big that it’s well beyond the ability of one federal government agency,” McDuffie said.

Visa Chief Information Security Officer Gary Warzala said that passion and commitment are the two qualities his company looks for when hiring employees.

“Imagine spending your career doing something you love,” Warzala said. “We need skilled people to come into the workforce immediately to hit the ground running.”

The remainder of the discussion was dedicated to moderated discussions between camp participants and national cybersecurity experts. Discussions ranged from the challenges each sector faces outside of human capital to obtaining offensive and top secret security clearances. Campers also inquired about what to teach at the college level and how to break away from entry-level jobs.

The most wide-ranging views received, however, were on the topic of certification.

“We have to provide a way to map our skills,” argued Sean Catlett, COO, iSight Partners.

Facebook Chief Security Officer Joe Sullivan had a different view on certification qualifications for contributors to Facebook’s Bug Bounty Program, a program that encourages its users to seek security weaknesses.

“We look at different factors,” Sullivan said. “Our objective is to measure if a person can solve problems.”

A job fair to connect campers with big name companies took place at 7 p.m. August 8 in the Barrett Ballroom at the Student Union.

The week will end with a virtual “capture the flag” competition and an awards ceremony at 1 p.m. August 10 in the Barrett Ballroom.