SJSU to Host Virtual Adobe Creative Jam Oct. 11-12

Donna Caldwell, a senior solutions consultant, leads the Adobe XD bootcamp for students who competed in the Adobe Creative Jam April 18, 2019. Photo by Robert C. Bain

Donna Caldwell, a senior solutions consultant, leads the Adobe XD bootcamp for students who competed in the Adobe Creative Jam April 18, 2019. Photo by Robert C. Bain

San Jose State University will host a unique virtual Adobe Creative Jam this month with participants from seven additional California State Universities. The event will kick off on Oct. 11 at 1 p.m. in Dwight Bentel Hall 117, and will end on Oct. 12. 

This two-day event builds on the success of a spring Digital Detox event in which SJSU students learned how to use Adobe XD, received portfolio and resume reviews, and created their own prototype app.

Spartans have many reasons to join the jam. John Delacruz, Associate Professor, Advertising and an Adobe Education Leader, sees this as a valuable learning opportunity for SJSU students who will eventually step into fast-paced industries. 

“The Adobe association adds value and weight to the student experience,” he said. “The digital badge they carry on their LinkedIn profiles and resumes that the company may provide them as participatory evidence is something that they don’t just get from the most progressive classroom. The value from collaborations like these give students a step up once they are looking for jobs.”

The jam is designed to be a fun event for students coming from diverse backgrounds and disciplines as they connect virtually. In true Spartan spirit, the goal is to rise above challenges, learning to work in a team, and developing creative skills and their applications in a time-sensitive environment. And the icing on the cake is that students can win cash prizes, will receive free food, and revel in the camaraderie on the team. 

How the Adobe Creative Jam will work: 

Students who sign up will be grouped into teams of three to five to work on a creative brief that’s topical and relevant. Speakers from Adobe and other design professionals will join the students via Crowdcast to share tips and advice on the field. There will also be a tutorial, a deep dive into Adobe XD—a design software required to accomplish the project.

Teams will then have two hours to brainstorm ideas, think of solutions, and come up with a prototype design, following which each team will get two to three minutes to present their ideas. 

A set of finalists from each campus will improve their ideas overnight and present them again to the judges virtually on Saturday. A fresh set of judges will select overall winners. The winning teams will receive $250 each, giveaways from Adobe along with plenty of other goodies. 

Delacruz is an advocate of engaging students in experiential learning and pedagogy, peer mentoring, and other exciting activities that happen in the creative field. He stresses that industries work on quick turnaround of projects, and students need to be aware of certain tools to get the work done effectively, and

“This is where Adobe chips in with the tools that creative industries are built on,” he said.

 

CSU Plan Offers Free Immigration Legal Services at All Campuses

Ana Navarrete Avina, the program coordinator of the UndocuSpartan Resource Center, speaks at an opening celebration for the center that was established in 2018. (Photo: James Tensuan, '15 Journalism)

Ana Navarrete Avina, the program coordinator of the UndocuSpartan Student Resource Center, speaks at an opening celebration for the center that was established in 2018. (Photo: James Tensuan, ’15 Journalism)

The California State University (CSU) announced Aug. 28 a systemwide plan for the provision of free immigration legal services for CSU students and employees that includes SJSU.

“This is an important service for SJSU, for our community and the CSU system,” said Patrick Day, vice president for the Division of Student Affairs.  “We are committed to providing support, resources and opportunities for all students regardless of their citizenship status.”

Immigrant Legal Defense (ILD) will provide services for San Jose State University as well as other Bay Area and Central California campuses. ILD’s attorneys and accredited representatives will visit SJSU beginning in September with availability throughout the year. ILD has expertise in covering the full scope of immigration law and procedure. The office has represented thousands of unaccompanied minors and families seeking asylum, and individuals involved in detained and non-detained immigration proceedings throughout California. In addition to providing legal consultations, the attorneys are also available to consult with departments that deal with immigration policies on questions they may have.

Approximately 9,500 CSU students are undocumented and receive AB 540 waivers across the system’s 23 campuses. Undocumented students will receive priority in scheduling of appointments and receiving legal assistance, followed by students and employees who have questions about legal immigration and rights.

The UndocuSpartan Student Resource Center will support the new services by scheduling appointments and providing meeting space. Ana Navarrete Avina, the UndocuSpartan Student Resource Center program coordinator shared an email to student, faculty and staff groups on Aug. 29 about the new services, inviting interested parties to sign up for appointments on one of the dates ILD will be on campus. Students and employees may also request a consultation with an immigration attorney outside of the scheduled dates by contacting the UndocuSpartan Student Resource Center. More information about signing up for appointments can be found on the Center’s website.

All representatives of ILD and SJSU staff will practice strict confidentiality and any information provided while receiving services will remain protected, as has always been the case for students with AB 540 or undocumented statuses

The legal services are an expansion of SJSU’s existing support provided through the UndocuSpartan Student Resource Center, established in 2018. The center provides a number of program services including personal and academic support, UndocuAlly Training, information for prospective students on paying for college, and connects enrolled students with community resources, among other services.

“I am delighted that we will be able to increase the availability of immigration legal services to the California State University community,” said CSU Chancellor Timothy White. “We remain committed to ensuring that all CSU students have the opportunity to pursue their higher education goals regardless of their country of origin. This inclusive foundation extends to our employees, who demonstrate their dedication to student achievement and success on a daily basis. These thousands of Californians are pursuing their dreams for a better future every day on CSU campuses. The expanded services and resources that will soon be available will bring support, legal guidance and some peace of mind to enable our students and employees to focus on academic and professional pursuits.”

Funding for the services initially was provided by a one-time allocation of $7 million from the 2018 Budget Act to the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) to implement direct immigration legal services programs on CSU campuses. California’s 2019-20 budget converted the same amount to recurring funding to maintain the services. Staff from CSU’s Office of the Chancellor have been working with the CDSS to design a systemwide delivery model for implementation.

To learn more about the rollout of services or for information about support services currently available for students and employees, please visit the CSU’s Resources for Undocumented Students website.

SJSU’s Tina Korani receives 2019 CSU Faculty Innovation and Leadership Award

Tina Korani, second from left, poses with School of Journalism and Mass Communications students during a graduate student showcase.

Tina Korani, second from left, poses with School of Journalism and Mass Communications students during a graduate student showcase.

Assistant Professor of Media Design Tina Korani joined San Jose State University in fall 2017. In just two short years, she has made a lasting impression on her students and how media design is taught at SJSU. She has been named by the California State University Chancellor’s Office as a 2019 Faculty Innovation and Leadership Award recipient for her dedication to experiential learning.

Korani is passionate about using new technologies to improve the learning experience. She believes that developing students’ digital skills and literacy should be a key focus of higher education. She said, “technology is moving our world forward at a rapid pace and we as educators should prepare our students for the workforce of tomorrow by incorporating digital literacy into our teaching to help students become successful in their careers.”

“I seek to provide my students with the necessary tools to move well beyond foundational skills and forward in their design thinking and creativity,” she said. “I provide relevant, real life application and foster collaboration, as I help them become stronger thinkers, collaborators, explorers, communicators, and designers.”

Tina Korani

Tina Korani

Her teaching philosophy is to empower students to be: confident, creative thinkers with exceptional presentation skills, compassionate, curious collaborators who seek opportunities to contribute to various projects, mindful explorers who look to expand their knowledge in solving problems with persistence and know-how to communicate their ideas and document this process effectively.

“I believe that undergraduate design education should connect to the real world and as a course of action I actively plan and devise practical experiences in and outside the classroom. These play a role in developing critical problem-solving skills, creativity, and communication skills and at the same time drive student engagement and retention,” she said.

Her students present their concepts and the process of their designs for each project to the entire class during weekly critique sessions, then they complete a mid-critique where students hear feedback before finalizing their designs. She said she believes critiques are a strong core to students’ learning that teaches them how to approach ideas critically while strengthening their communication and presentation skills. She also requires students to submit a process book that contains their sources of inspiration, research, sketches, and the steps on how they came up with their idea and final product.

“By documenting these steps for each project, my students learn value in this process and see personal growth,” she said.

Korani also engages students in research and conference presentations. She mentored a team of graduate students who developed “Bridge Brain: Engaging with the Next-Generation of Academic Scholars,” a web-based, peer-to-peer collaborative platform for university networking for research projects. The students were invited to present their work at the 2018 DECIPHER (Design Educators Research Conference). The students also won the 2018 Best Education Innovation Award in SJSU’s Silicon Valley Innovation Challenge.

Korani was selected for CSU’s Faculty Innovation and Leadership Award after being nominated by peers in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications as well as students, who created a video testimonial touting their professor.

“Her class provides students with unique experiential learning that is different than the typical lecture format of many other professors,” said Jihye Woo, a graduate student in Mass Communications. “The newly learned skills are more easily transferable outside the classroom and to our future careers.”

Professor Korani and students in MCOM 284: Advanced User experience class.

Professor Korani and students in MCOM 284: Advanced User experience class.

Woo noted that five of the graduate students in her program selected Korani as an advisor because of her “dedication, perseverance and compassion.”

“The School of Journalism and Mass Communications lives and dies on our ability to keep up with a rapidly advancing technological media landscape,” wrote Professor Scott Fosdick, graduate coordinator, in his nomination letter. “Assistant Professor Korani was hired to keep us on the cutting edge. She hasn’t let us down.”

Associate Professor Diane Guerrazzi shared in her nomination letter Korani’s interactions with journalists from the country of Georgia who visited SJSU as part of a Media Education Partnership through the U.S. State Department.

“In hands-on sessions, they designed infographics to visualize data, giving them valuable new tools of expression in their storytelling for their television, web and print media outlets,” Guerrazzi wrote. “I observed the way Professor Korani took care to explain the steps, in spite of a language barrier.  She patiently answered questions and encouraged participants to ask questions.”

Korani has presented her work and led workshops in the Adobe San Jose office during CSU/Adobe Digital Literacy Day and is honored to serve as an Adobe Education Leader (Adobe Education Leaders are dedicated to enhancing creativity and collaboration and improving the teaching and learning experience. They share their expertise through workshops and conferences and help develop standards-based curriculums that are used worldwide).

In service to her community, she has started teaching free mobile application design bootcamps for youth at Central Park Library in Santa Clara. She has also been helping to organize and served as a juror in many art contests, such as International Mother Language Day Art Contest and exhibition at the Children Discovery Museum in San Jose.

Korani holds an M.F.A. in graphic design from Louisiana State University and a bachelor’s in visual communication from Art University of Tehran. Her research centers on the use of interactive technologies to enhance learner engagement, education equity, and accessibility. She has introduced the use of emerging technologies into her teaching, and overall within the School of Journalism & Mass Communications. She is involved in multiple grants, and her projects range from training at-risk students on new media literacy in area high schools to creating a mobile app within her role as a co-investigator in a Breast Cancer Survivorship Project.

She is the recipient of multiple awards from the American Advertising Federation, including a National ADDY Award, and a Gold District 7 ADDY Award in 2017. As a speaker and educator, Korani has presented her work at numerous academic and professional conferences.

Governor Brown Proposes $500 Million Cut to CSU

The CSU and SJSU are reviewing the details of Governor Jerry Brown’s proposed $500 million budget reduction to the CSU for 2011-2012, part of a sweeping effort that would slash spending by $12.5 billion. While it is too early to identify a specific means to implement such a budget reduction, all options are on the table. In the past, SJSU has employed tuition increases, enrollment reductions, furloughs, layoffs and cuts to programs such as remedial education. Continue reading

Three finalists.

Presidential Search: Watch Finalist Open Forums

Three finalists.

Watch finalist open forums online.

The California State University recently named three finalists for the presidency of San José State University:

  • Mohammad H. Qayoumi, president, California State University, East Bay
  • Leroy M. Morishita, executive vice president and chief financial officer, at San Francisco State University
  • David Steele, dean, College of Business, San José State University

The finalist open forums are now available online for viewing.

More Information

Read more on the presidential search.#

General inquiries can be directed to the SJSU Office of Public Affairs, 408-924-1166, publicaffairs@sjsu.edu.

Reporters should call Pat Lopes Harris, media relations director, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu.

SJSU in the News: SJSU, CSU Campuses Urged to Give Local Students Priority

Originally published in the San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 15, 2011.

Students applying to jam-packed California State University don’t always get into their campus of choice, but they’ve always been able to count on priority admission to their local CSU.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/02/14/MN8V1HMTHI.DTL#ixzz1E9qPcRqq

Interim President Don Kassing speaking to the congregation at Maranatha Christian Center.

CSU Super Sunday: Kassing Supports Investing in Young People

Interim President Don Kassing speaking to the congregation at Maranatha Christian Center.

Interim President Don Kassing speaking to the congregation at Maranatha Christian Center.

By Keith Bryant, Digital Communications Assistant
Photo By Irving Perez, Public Affairs Volunteer

SJSU Interim President Don W. Kassing visited Maranatha Christian Center Feb. 13 for CSU Super Sunday, an outreach program seeking to connect the CSU with African American churches to open a dialogue about what it takes to get into college. Kassing was welcomed with open arms, and enjoyed a lively and energetic service. He also spoke to the congregation about the importance of investing in our youth.

“Our offer is to create opportunities for young people to go to college to work their way out of the recession, as it is going require education, and in this region, innovation,” Kassing said. “We want these young people to have a chance.”

Kassing also attended Emmanuel Baptist Church, while Vice President for Student Affairs Jason Laker visited Bible Way Christian Center. After the services, SJSU outreach staff members spoke one-on-one with church goers to answer questions and distribute materials.

While Cal State University raises tuition, over-60 students get in free

By: Lisa M Krieger/Mercury News

At a time when state budget cuts are increasing fees for young students at California State University, a little-known program allows senior citizens to enroll for free.

The “Over 60 Program” waives tuition for Californians 60 or older, regardless of income. Meanwhile, since its creation 30 years ago, annual tuition for younger students has climbed from $160 to $4,230. And last year, CSU cut back enrollment by thousands of students, while continuing to allow any interested elders to register for open classes.

It’s a small program — only 900 of 433,000 CSU students participated last year — but the education is worth an estimated $2 million to $3 million annually.

For students such as Timothy Fitzgerald, 64, it enables a lifelong path of education. While living on meager Social Security and disability benefits, he’s completing his fifth degree at San Jose State University and his third master’s.

“I see it as a benefit that the state can offer older citizens, helping us pursue a life of the mind,” said Fitzgerald, a conscientious student who has spent every recent afternoon at SJSU’s Martin Luther King Library preparing for a philosophy exam.

“I never would have had an opportunity to go to school unless there was support for tuition,” he said. “I do not want to sit on the sidelines.”

Another CSU student, 76-year-old Frances Gordon, made headlines in 2002 when she graduated summa cum laude from the San Marcos campus, arriving at graduation ceremonies on a red Honda motorcycle.

Space is scarce

The senior students don’t bump younger students; they register after regular students are enrolled and if there’s no space, they don’t get a seat.

But the entire system is under stress. Tuition has increased seven times in eight years. And CSU has taken other budget-cutting measures, such as reducing enrollment, implementing furloughs and cutting staff.

“Free education for folks over 60 is a nice thing for the public to support,” said Steve Boilard of the Legislative Analyst’s Office in Sacramento, who studies the state’s higher education spending patterns. “But the question isn’t ‘Is it good?’ but rather, ‘Is it the best way to spend our education dollars?’ ”

Further, Boilard noted, “Turning away recent high school graduates while providing slots to retirees isn’t the best way to allocate scarce enrollment slots.”

San Jose State parent Marie Ciano is 59, but said, “I do not believe it is fair for anyone to receive a waiver because of age.” Upon turning 60, she said she’d welcome paying a small fee. “I would like to attend some classes for the joy of the knowledge without placing a burden on the resources of the university.”

There are some tuition breaks offered to a few other groups of students, as well. For instance, children of dead or disabled veterans get a free education, regardless of family income. So do children of dead or injured firefighters, police officers or victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack — but they must prove financial need.

The Over 60 Program was established by CSU trustees in 1979, when California’s economy was strong and the state supported 90 percent of the cost of a CSU education — and the total cost of tuition was merely $160.

Faculty say they cherish the program and its older students.

“Such a program fits squarely with CSU’s mission and therefore should be celebrated, along with all other drives for equity and access in education,” said English professor Stefan Frazier.

“I was delighted to have them in my classes, said professor John Engell, chairman of the Department of English and Comparative Literature. “These older students exemplify the idea of education as a lifelong endeavor, and they bring to class a wealth of experiences and wisdom. They therefore serve as role models for younger students.”

“However, I wonder if SJSU might find a positive way to urge these over-60 students to become active financial contributors to the university during our current budget crisis,” Engell said.

Positive step

Some students also believe the program is a positive step.

“I fully support the Over 60 Program,” said Eric Acedo, a San Jose State junior majoring in environmental studies.

“Although relentless fee increases make staying in college more and more unattainable for regular students, that does not justify creating more difficulty in pursuing further education by revoking the benefits of the Over 60 Program. The less economic barriers there are to battling ignorance, the better.”

Boilard, of the Legislative Analyst’s Office, suggested “means testing,” so that wealthy retirees would be expected to pay. Several parents suggested a way for older students to “audit” courses, rather than taking them for academic credit.

Meanwhile, Fitzgerald is hitting the books. Fitzgerald has enrolled in the program since 2006, earning a 3.4 GPA in courses such as Political Sociology; Poverty, Power and Wealth; and a graduate seminar in financial inequality.

If he passes his exam, he’ll have graduate degrees in philosophy, history and sociology. He hopes it will help him publish his memoirs and a study of Later 20th Century Life in San Jose and the Far West.

“I am not likely to take more coursework from San Jose State,” he said, sadly. “What would they admit me to study, if they did?”