SJSU Budget Update

Contact: Pat Harris, 408-924-1748

SAN JOSE, CA–San Jose State University will present a detailed overview of its projected 2015-16 operating budget at an open forum 1:30 to 3 p.m. April 20 in King Library, Room 255. This will include enrollment projections established by the CSU and projections of expected revenues and expenses. The presentation will be available online after the forum.

“Our budget plan reflects a sustained commitment to our people and our mission while living within financial realities,” President Mohammad Qayoumi said. “I encourage you to attend the April 20 budget forum to learn more.”

The 2015-16 operating budget will include several new investments in student, faculty and staff success:

  • President Qayoumi has approved $800,000 for salary equity adjustments for tenure-track and tenured faculty members over a two-year period beginning July 1, 2015.
  • SJSU will provide a salary equity adjustment for some university staff. Those plans are still in the works but we have set aside $500,000 for a two-year program beginning in July 2015; we will share more information as plans round into shape.
  • For the first time, the CSU is empowering campuses to develop their own funding models and plans for financing renovations and new capital construction. SJSU will set aside $300,000 in base funding and $2 million in one-time funds as our first investment in a “capital reserve” fund. Details on this will be shared at the April 20 budget forum.
  • President Qayoumi set aside $1 million in base funding to establish an Office of Diversity and Inclusive Excellence. Led by a chief diversity officer, this office will also have an assessment specialist, Title IX coordinator, administrative support and operating funds for diversity programming. This office will help us leverage all of the efforts already underway to make SJSU a more welcoming community for everyone.
  • Consistent with all schools in the Mountain West Conference and the other NCAA Division I Bowl Subdivision conferences, $1.6 million will be dedicated to funding scholarships for our student-athletes to reflect the “full cost of attendance.”

SJSU develops a budget plan based on reasonable assumptions about funding from the state and other sources. The university does this knowing that actual revenues always vary slightly from projections. This is because the state budget is rarely enacted until close to the official July 1 start of the new fiscal year.

San Jose State—Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,740 employees—is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Student Success Fee

Student Success Fee Update

Student Success Fee

The university will sustain its commitment to all existing student support programs while implementing a fee reduction for the 2014-15 academic year (Bruce F. Cramer photo).

Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748

San Jose, CASan Jose State University, in consultation with elected student leaders, announced today fundamental changes to the Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee. With these changes, the university will sustain its commitment to all existing student support programs while implementing a fee reduction for the 2014-15 academic year.

“This semester was a good time to re-consider this fee, which we introduced two years ago,” said President Mohammad Qayoumi. “We had very productive discussions with student leaders and we will continue to welcome input from the university community.”

Here are the changes students should expect this fall:

  • The Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee will be “unbundled.” This means it will be split into three components: the Instructionally Related Activities Fee ($147), Course Support Fee ($30), and Student Success Fee ($118).
  • When combined, the total of the three fees will be $295 for fall 2014, equivalent to the fall 2013 rate and well below the $375 rate originally set for fall 2014.
  • This change will clarify the purpose of each fee and facilitate comparisons with other CSU campuses.

Here is how the changes will impact programming and oversight:

  • Revenue from these fees will allow San Jose State to support all existing programs and several new proposals for 2014-15.
  • Athletics will continue to receive support through the Instructionally Related Activities Fee. This was the case previous to the introduction of the SSETF, which incorporated the IRA.
  • Associated Students, the Academic Senate and the divisions of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs will share oversight of these fees.

A few weeks ago, elected student leaders proposed holding a student poll to obtain feedback on the appropriate amounts for these fees. The administration voiced support for this approach. However, student leaders felt garnering sufficient student feedback was unrealistic at this point in the semester due to competing priorities such as final exams, graduation, employment, and housing.

“Students have the right to know what their fees are paying for and unbundling the Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee will improve this needed transparency,” said Nicholas Ayala, Associated Students of SJSU president. “Our interest in the future of this fee is what is in the best interest of all San Jose State students. In order to make an informed recommendation, there must be adequate time for students to be educated and weigh in on this decision.”

San Jose State University—Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees—is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee.

President’s Update: Success Fee

a protest on Tuesday focused on SJSU’s Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee

Administrators address students April 29 at Tower Hall (Christiana Cobb photo).

On April 29, President Qayoumi emailed the following message to all students, faculty, staff and administrators.

Dear SJSU Community,

As many of you know, a protest on Tuesday focused on SJSU’s Student Success, Excellence and Technology Fee. There have been discussions here and on many other California State University campuses about success fees, which fund essential student services that would otherwise be unavailable because state budget appropriations remain below pre-Recession levels.

At San Jose State, my administration has been meeting with student leaders on this topic for several months. While the success fee funds programs and services that benefit many students, we understand that the fee is a substantial addition to the total cost of attendance.

We have been developing plans to address this concern, and we will act on two fronts:

  • This fall, we will unbundle the success fee into three components. This should make it easier to follow the allocation of these fees to courses, to other instructional activities such as library materials, and to student support services such as academic advising and technology.
  • Student leaders have suggested surveying students to research an acceptable dollar ceiling for the success fee. I agree that polling students is a good idea and we will work together to make this happen, ideally by the end of this term. Our plan is to take the poll into consideration when setting the success fee for fall 2014. Students should expect a fee reduction.

We welcome the opportunity for further discussion with the campus community, and will update you on our progress.

Cordially,

Mohammad Qayoumi
President

Budget Update

The following can be attributed to San Jose State President Mohammad Qayoumi:

I want to update you on our current-year academic budget and recent reports of possible cuts to spring 2014 course sections.

First, let me be clear: we will restore course sections originally planned for spring 2014.

Although academic programs across the university were on a path to exceed their total budget by the end of the spring 2014 semester, I am fully committed to ensuring that our students have access to the classes they need.

Accordingly, we are taking one-time funds allocated to campus infrastructure and other projects, and redirecting them to academic units. This will allow those units to restore class sections they may otherwise have intended to eliminate.

I am taking this action to help our students continue progressing toward their degrees.

Some of you will remember that SJSU began the 2012-13 fiscal year with a $32 million structural deficit. We elected to eliminate that deficit incrementally over a two-year period. Half of the deficit was eliminated through cuts prior to this fiscal year. The rest was eliminated when voters approved Proposition 30 last November.

The bottom line is, San Jose State began the 2013-14 fiscal year with a balanced budget. Contrary to what you may have heard or read, our budget remains balanced today.  

As a community, we worked diligently to restore financial stability. It wasn’t easy, and I appreciate your stellar efforts.

Units impacted by the redirection of one-time funds will be informed by their vice presidents. Thank you for your patience as we continue working to deliver the services and support our students need and deserve.

NBC Bay Area: Congressman Visits SJSU to See Impact of Sequestration Cuts

NBC Bay Area: Congressman Visits SJSU to See Impact of Sequestration Cuts

NBC Bay Area: Congressman Visits SJSU to See Impact of Sequestration Cuts

NBC Bay Area interviews SJSU student Vanessa Jimenez.

Posted by NBC Bay Area Sept. 5, 2013.

South Bay Congressman Mike Honda toured the science labs at San Jose State University to get a better understanding of how students are being affected by federal cuts. Damian Trujillo reports. Read more about the event and the Minority Access to Research Careers program.

$208,863,349 raised during the Acceleration Campaign

Exceeding Our Goal, Powering Our Future

$208,863,349 raised during the Acceleration Campaign

Strong support helped “Acceleration: The Campaign for San Jose State” exceed its goal and conclude one year earlier than anticipated.

Media contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6999

SAN JOSE, CA – President Mohammad Qayoumi announced today that San Jose State University has raised more than $208 million in private giving during its first-ever, multi-year comprehensive fundraising campaign. Strong support helped “Acceleration: The Campaign for San Jose State” exceed its goal and conclude one year earlier than anticipated. President Qayoumi made the announcement during his Fall Welcome Address, an annual tradition marking the advent of the academic year. (View prepared remarks.)

“Let me take this opportunity to thank all involved for their hard work and strong commitment,” President Qayoumi said. “We owe a debt of gratitude to all of our donors for believing and investing in San Jose State. Together, we have laid a solid foundation for the next campaign.”

San Jose State President Mohammad Qayoumi delivered the Fall Welcome Address on Aug. 19 in Morris Dailey Auditorium.

President Mohammad Qayoumi delivered the Fall Welcome Address on Aug. 19 in Morris Dailey Auditorium.

Acceleration began in 2006 with the goal of raising $200 million in eight years from individuals, corporations and foundations. SJSU received more than 30,000 individual gifts, with half of the donors hailing from the Bay Area. The funds raised will support all seven colleges, the University Library, Student Affairs and Intercollegiate Athletics. Planning for the next campaign is underway.

SJSU’s Strategic Plan

Using San Jose State’s strategic plan as a framework for his Fall Welcome Address to faculty and staff members and students, Qayoumi focused on the university’s five long-term goals, including “Unbounded Learning,” which encompasses all efforts to enhance student success through continuous learning innovations.

The president highlighted enhancements across the disciplines, including engineering, business, education, math and computer science. Qayoumi also affirmed his commitment to San Jose State’s most controversial efforts, which have involved instructors experimenting with massive open online course platforms offered by edX and Udacity.

“I hope our collective curiosity and passion for student success motivates us to continually explore new approaches to teaching and learning,” President Qayoumi said. “I am encouraged that our faculty members are considered innovators and pioneers. Change is hard. Yet it is essential that we improve student access, enhance academic performance, shorten time to degree and increase graduation rates.”

Planning for the Future

President Qayoumi continued by describing progress with nearly a dozen ongoing or planned campus construction projects, reflecting SJSU’s strategic goal of developing “21st Century Spaces.” The president also declared the university budget structurally balanced for the first time in recent memory, applauding officials for passing the state budget on time and restoring support for the California State University system.

“We have accomplished much in the past year, and there is much more to be done,” President Qayoumi said. “A spirit of collaboration and shared mission will be more important than ever.  All of our efforts will involve discussion.  A few may even provoke disagreement. Let us commit ourselves to respectful, civil, collegial and healthy dialogue.  I am confident that together we can continue to transform San Jose State in its continuing journey for excellence.“

San Jose State University — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

 

Fall Welcome Address

President to Deliver Fall Welcome Address

Fall Welcome Address

President Mohammad Qayoumi

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6999

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State President Mohammad Qayoumi will deliver the Fall Welcome Address at noon Aug. 19 in Morris Dailey Auditorium. The event is open to the campus community and media. Afterward, a video and transcript will be accessible from the SJSU homepage.

An annual tradition, the gathering for faculty, staff and students marks the beginning of a new academic year. President Qayoumi will reflect on the successes of the previous year, and frame future challenges and opportunities.

The president’s speech will include a significant announcement about Acceleration: The Campaign for San Jose State University, the first comprehensive fundraising campaign in SJSU history.

In addition, he will provide updates on the budget, Strategic Plan: Vision 2017 and campus capital improvements.

SJSU map, directions.

San Jose State University — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

CSU Logo

Budget News: Holding the Line on Tuition Increases

Governor Vows to Hold the Line on Tuition Hikes

It’s too early to tell exactly how this will impact SJSU but “the funding proposed…is a critical investment in the future of California,” said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

Governor Jerry Brown’s latest budget proposal calls for more state government spending on the CSU each year through 2016-2017. Brown also calls for a four-year tuition freeze (view current SJSU tuition and fees).

The governor’s “May Revision” (an updated version of the 2013-2014 state budget presented back in January) proposes $125 million more in funding for the California State University system compared to last year plus the reinstatement of $125 million in cuts.

It’s too early to tell exactly how this will impact SJSU but “the funding proposed for public higher education…is a critical investment in the future of California,” said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

The proposal also states that the governor will work with the UCs, CSUs, community colleges and legislature on a framework that would link state spending to performance, such as improving graduation rates.

Overall, the proposed budget would bring CSU state funding to $2.3 billion, approximately the same as 1999-2000, although the system now serves 75,000 more students.

Next up, the CSU Board of Trustees meeting will meet May 21 and 22 to discuss the revised budget proposal. Meanwhile, the state legislature will take up the overall state package, with the expectation it will pass in June. The fiscal year begins July 1. View the SJSU Budget Central website.

01-mo

President Hosts Budget Forum

President Hosts Budget Forum

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

At April 22’s budget forum, President Qayoumi began with good news about exactly how Proposition 30 impacts SJSU. View the event video and slides here.

Prop. 30 provided SJSU with $5.5 million that will be used this year for more course sections, classroom improvements, tech upgrades and Spartan Complex renovations.

SJSU could receive an additional $13.2 million next year if the legislature approves the $250 million increase the California State University budget proposed by Governor Brown.

There is no word yet on tuition increases for students and pay increases for faculty and staff, matters addressed by the system overall rather than each campus.

We’ll know more after the “May Revise,” an update of the budget proposal released in January. The legislature expects to pass the budget package in June. The new fiscal year begins July 1.

Auxiliaries

But the hundreds of students who packed the front rows of Morris Dailey Auditorium focused on the planned merger of four of SJSU’s five auxiliaries.

Students demanded a greater voice in the process, which would combine the Student Union, Spartan Shops, the Tower Foundation and the Research Foundation.

Qayoumi explained the merger is still very much in the planning process, with the goal of gaining efficiencies through unifying common functions such as financial services, IT and HR.

A taskforce of business managers for each auxiliary has issued a report that the president will share with each organization’s board of directors.

Qayoumi assured the students that fees collected for Student Union, Aquatics Center and Fitness Center renovations will be used for no other purpose.

Online Initiatives

The question and answer session then turned to other topics, including funding for SJSU’s online initiatives.

Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn explained students pay for the Udacity courses through the College of International and Extended Studies.

San Jose State has paid nothing for edX materials blended into campus-based courses. But as the collaboration expands, SJSU will pay a licensing fee.

To cover the cost, the provost has applied for a grant to be funded through $10 million Governor Brown set aside for CSU online efforts.

Governor Vows to Hold the Line on Tuition Hikes

CSU Prioritizes Student Access and Success in Balanced Budget Plan

CSU Prioritizes Student Access and Success in Balanced Budget Plan

The passage of Proposition 30 will translate to relative stability for the next four years, with the governor budgeting an additional $125 million for the system in the coming fiscal year.

The California State University Board of Trustees met March 19 in Long Beach to discuss the 2013-2014 budget. “After struggling through one of the toughest times in CSU history, the system is now in a position to address some of its critical needs,” said Robert Turnage, assistant vice chancellor for budget. “Putting students first, the CSU’s budget plan strikes a balance among the many legitimate claims for available resources.” So the passage of Proposition 30 will translate to relative stability for the next four years, with the governor budgeting an additional $125 million for the system in the coming fiscal year. The board discussed using the increase to grow enrollment, develop online strategies for bottleneck classes (SJSU is well on it way with its Udacity and edX pilot programs), adjust faculty and staff wages for the first time since the recession began, and cover mandatory cost increases for employee health benefits and energy. We’re still waiting to learn exactly how this will affect SJSU. But meanwhile we do know this very good news for students: The Board of Trustees is committed to holding the line on tuition increases in 2013-2014. View current SJSU tuition and fees. Up next? The governor issues his annual “May Revise,” which is an updated version of the budget proposal released in January, taking into consideration the latest state revenue figures. Then the legislature is expected to approve the budget by June 15. The new fiscal year begins July 1. We’ve got a ways to go, so tay tuned! Read a related CSU news release.

Governor Vows to Hold the Line on Tuition Hikes

Governor Proposes $125.1 Million Budget Investment for CSU

Governor Proposes $125.1 Million Budget Investment for CSU

Consistent with the governor’s plan to make higher education more affordable, the budget assumes that the university will not increase tuition and fees in 2013-14.

Governor Brown has released a 2013-2014 state budget proposal that signals a renewed investment in higher education with the addition of $125.1 million in state funding for the California State University. The Governor’s budget also reinstates $125 million that was cut from last year’s budget and was due to be reimbursed in this year’s budget following the successful passage of Proposition 30.

“We appreciate the Governor’s recognition that California will benefit from the investment of state funds into higher education,” said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “The proposed budget heads us in the right direction,” continued White. “It will allow the CSU to address the unprecedented demand for high quality education at our institutions, as well as areas of critical need. We still face many fiscal challenges and will continue efforts to operate efficiently and effectively, and seek out additional innovative ways to control costs.”

Overall, the increase in state support for the CSU brings state funding levels to $2.2 billion for the support of university programs and operations. As part of its 2013-2014 budget ask of the governor and legislature, CSU had requested a total of $371.9 million over its current baseline budget that includes state funds, tuition and systemwide fees. Consistent with the governor’s plan to make higher education more affordable, the budget assumes that the university will not increase tuition and fees in 2013-14.

View current SJSU tuition and fees.

Read more about the governor’s proposal for the CSU.

Read more about the CSU’s request.

 

towerhall_towerlawn_web-300x199

Budget Forum Focuses on Proposition 30

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

Dr. Mohammad Qayoumi

President Mohammad Qayoumi thanked students who took an active role in the 2012 elections and explained how the passage of Proposition 30 will benefit SJSU at a campuswide budget forum Nov. 27.

“Kudos to students who took the election to heart,” Qayoumi said. “This is tremendously important. Leadership is something that needs to be recognized.”

Qayoumi opened the event, which you can view on the SJSU Budget Central website, by providing a quick overview of the California State University 2013-14 budget request.

The CSU will ask the governor and legislature for $371.9 million over its current baseline budget to fund enrollment growth, compensation increases and facilities maintenance.

Yet Qayoumi remains cautious. The passage of Proposition 30 stabilizes the state budget and means the CSU will avoid a $250 million trigger cut while rolling tuition to 2011-12 levels. View current SJSU tuition and fees.

Taking these two factors into consideration, SJSU will net $5.5 million. This will alleviate SJSU’s structural deficit, but SJSU continues to face a $27 million gap.

Cautious Optimism

So while SJSU expects to hire 22 tenure track faculty members this year and honor the expected minimum wage increase in San Jose, the campus will continue to look for ways to reduce expenses, increase revenue and improve efficiencies.

In a question and answer session following the presentation, a faculty member sought to compare the percentage of the budget spent on faculty affairs and student affairs.

SJSU’s 2012-13 budget report (page 9) shows faculty affairs receives 53 percent of the budget, while Student Affairs receives 5.7 percent of the budget. Another big slice–nearly 25 percent–covers university-wide expenses, with the majority going to student financial aid and utilities.

A student raised concerns about buildings that are too hot during the summer, and too cold during the winter.

SJSU must compete with the 22 other CSU campuses for facilities funding, and is at a disadvantage given 75 percent of San Jose State’s structures are more than 40 years old.

However, the president explained, SJSU is developing a facilities master plan in preparation for the state’s next general obligation bond, which is expected in the next few years as the economy recovers.

Next Forum

President Qayoumi plans to host the another budget forum in late February, after the CSU reviews Governor Brown’s proposed 2013-14 state budget, which will be released in early January.

The governor will revise his proposal in May, taking into consideration updated tax revenue projections. The legislature is expected to act on the proposal before the start of the next fiscal year July 1, 2013.

49-carlos-slide

Spartans Impact 2012 Elections

SJSU's Impact on the 2012 Elections

Olympian John Carlos appeared with Measure D supporters at Legacy Week (photo courtesy of Scott Myers-Lipton).

San Jose State had a profound effect on the 2012 Elections, and vice versa.

An SJSU student started the movement that became Measure D, which will raise the minimum wage in San Jose to $10 per hour.

Marisela Castro won the support of her sociology professor, her classmates and voters, raising the potential of spawning a national movement.

Assistant Professor Melinda Jackson and Professor Larry Gerston took to the airwaves election night, serving as political commentators on KGO and NBC, respectively.

But it was the eight-year-old son of two other faculty members who stole the show. Ethan Percival correctly predicted the electoral college breakdown, winning a politics department contest.

Talk about starting young. Among the professors he beat were his parents, Assistant Professor Garrick Percival and Lecturer Mary Currin-Percival.

Jim Beall, Paul Fong, Barbara Spector, Larry Carr, Debbie Giordano and Rod Diridon, Jr. were among the many Spartans who won local elections. Know of more? Please contact us!

Proposition 30

Voters clearly voiced their support for public higher education by passing Proposition 30, which will stabilize state funding for SJSU in the short term.

President Mohammad Qayoumi will host a post-election budget forum 9 a.m. Nov. 27 in the Student Union Loma Prieta room.  The event will be streamed live online on the SJSU Budget Central website.

Students were of course thrilled to learn tuition would be rolled back to 2011-2012 levels, effective fall of this year. View current SJSU tuition and fees.

Some but not all students will receive refunds. If you’re a student, MySJSU is your first and best source of information.

New Fees?

One week after the elections, CSU Board of Trustees backed off plans to discuss fee increases for three specific groups of students: those who have earned more than 150 credits, those taking 18 or more credits, and those repeating courses.

Administrators want existing students to graduate, opening seats for new students. But trustees need time to “gather additional information and input from stakeholders,” according to a CSU news release.

Around 385 SJSU students with more than 150 credits and 150 students enrolled in 18 or more credits would have been affected if the fees had been implemented this term. Academic advising is available to all.

Governor Vows to Hold the Line on Tuition Hikes

Cal State Trustees Adopt Budget Contingency Plans

CSU logo

Governor’s May Revision Avoids Direct Cuts to CSU

System Prepares Scenarios Dependent on Governor’s Tax Measure

Contacts: Claudia Keith or Mike Uhlenkamp, (562) 951-4800

The California State University Board of Trustees  adopted on Sept. 19 budget contingency measures based on the outcome of Proposition 30 on the November 6 ballot.  The board voted 11 to 3 to raise tuition fees by $150 a semester or 5 percent if the Governor’s tax initiative fails and a $250 million “trigger” budget cut to the CSU goes into effect. Alternatively, the board also voted to roll back the 9.1 percent tuition fee increase already in effect for fall if voters approve the tax measure. Faculty trustee Bernadette Cheyne, student trustee Jillian Ruddell and Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson voted against the resolutions.

“It is clear that we cannot simply cut our way out of another $250 million hit to our budget,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed.  “We need to take a balanced approach in terms of cost reductions and revenue enhancements. That is reflected in the contingency plans approved by the board.”

View the CSU Budget Central website, the SJSU Budget Central website, or current SJSU tuition and campus fees.

Read the full news release.

towerhall_towerlawn_web-300x199

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

SJSU decided to focus on closing low enrollment electives in favor of high enrollment graduation requirements. It turns out that approximately 1,700 sections of the 5,000 sections offered annually had enrollments of less than 15 students.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

For the first two weeks of each term, many SJSU students invest quite a bit of time in trying to drop and add classes in order to build a schedule that works. This is a difficult process, made even harder this year by budget cuts. Because state government support has dropped dramatically, resulting in an over $30 million budget deficit on our campus, SJSU is in the process of cutting a total of 500 sections this academic year, which equates to approximately 4.6 percent of the total. The process began during spring term, when the provost and deans started looking for ways to reduce the number of sections SJSU offers while minimizing the impact on the amount of time it takes for students to graduate.

SJSU decided to focus on closing low enrollment courses. It turns out that approximately 1,700 sections of the 5,000 sections offered during the fall had enrollments of less than 15 students. The provost, deans and department chairs made the cuts in a strategic manner, so that although SJSU is offering fewer sections this fall, the grand total for the number of seats offered in all sections has increased. In the future, SJSU will look for ways to continue to offer some of the cut courses, perhaps every other term, every other year, or by combining similar courses, with an emphasis on graduation requirements over electives.

Over the past week or so, the provost, deans and department chairs have been adding seats and sections as needed to “bottleneck” courses, which are classes required by many majors such as basic biology. You can get the latest numbers by going to the Office of Institutional Research website, and clicking on “Enrollment Planning.”

Provost Ellen Junn explained much of this at a forum held Sept. 5 in Morris Dailey Auditorium. Her presentation was taped, and you can watch it here.

How This Impacts Faculty

SJSU’s faculty is comprised of tenured and tenure-track professors, supplemented by part-time temporary lecturers on one- to three-year contracts. Many lecturers have taught at SJSU throughout their careers. Quite a few are working professionals who bring first-hand knowledge of their industries into the classroom, which is vital given the emphasis we place on applied learning. The value we place on lecturers for their contributions in the classroom and beyond is exemplified by our current Academic Senate Chair Beth Von Till, a lecturer in communications studies.

Reducing the number of sections means shifting the teaching workload from lecturers to professors. This results in less release time for professors pursuing special projects, and fewer opportunities for part-time temporary lecturers. How many faculty members do we have this fall compared to last fall? As of Aug. 30, we had 129 fewer lecturers this fall compared to one year ago. But because some lecturers work full time, while others work part time, it is also important to look at the numbers in terms of full time equivalents (FTEs). As of Aug. 30, SJSU had 60 fewer lecturer FTEs this fall compared to last fall.

Why Not Cut Other Divisions?

This is an important point, and one that bears further explanation and discussion. In particular, members of the university community and the media are focusing on the Office of the President, University Advancement and Athletics, which did not sustain cuts this year. President Mohammad Qayoumi addressed this at the Budget Forum held Sept. 10. You can watch it here.

More options to get info include attending provost’s forums and Academic Senate meetings, both of which are held monthly; discussing your concerns with members of Budget Advisory Task Force, listed on the SJSU Budget Central web site; and submitting suggestions by email. Please consider getting involved. It’s the best way to have a say and to understand the thinking behind the decisions intended to move our campus forward.

7833993274_8c5f4391fa-2g90shx-198x300

President Delivers Fall Welcome Address

President Delivers Fall Welcome Address

President Qayoumi discussed the budget, including the governor’s tax initiative on the November ballot, and the transformative changes needed to balance the books given the avalanche of reductions San Jose State experienced in the recent past (Robert Bain photo).

Media contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6999

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University President Mohammad Qayoumi delivered the Fall Welcome Address Aug. 20 in Morris Dailey Auditorium. The speech was streamed live, and a video recording and transcript are available.

An annual tradition, the Fall Welcome Address provides the opportunity for us to come together and reflect on recent accomplishments, identify emerging issues and challenges, and review priorities and opportunities for the coming year.

Associated Students of SJSU President Calvin Worsnup opened the event, noting SJSU will begin the year with 400 student organizations, reflecting the vibrancy and diversity of our student body.

Academic Senate Chair Beth Von Till encouraged faculty, staff and students to transform the unanticipated challenges facing SJSU into new opportunities to teach and mentor our students.

President Qayoumi discussed the budget, including the governor’s tax initiative on the November ballot, and the transformative changes needed to balance the books given the avalanche of reductions San Jose State experienced in the recent past.

Unlimited Opportunities

The president also explored the many ways SJSU has made progress in this challenging environment, including the development of strategic and academic plans reflecting the unlimited opportunities for partnering and fostering innovation given our location in Silicon Valley.

For example, Qayoumi reported Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Junn is preparing for SJSU’s first cluster hire, which means hiring a cross disciplinary group of faculty members with expertise in a specific field. In this case, that field is cyber security.

“This is a time of great challenge, but it is also a time of great opportunity,” the president concluded. “There is still much more work to be done and as budget cuts deepen, there will be difficult consequences. I believe that if we take advantage of the opportunities to transform now, we will be a stronger, better university.”

San José State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

 

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

In the past, this time of year was when SJSU accepted applications for spring admissions, mostly from community college transfer students, but also from graduate students entering programs accepting newcomers in the middle of the academic year. Beginning in 2009, when SJSU was hit by severe budget cuts, spring admissions varied depending on the budget situation and the number of enrolled students. This fall, SJSU has already filled every spot available to California residents for the entire academic year, meaning California residents are filling all seats supported by a combination of state and tuition dollars. So SJSU opened spring admissions to only non-resident graduate students from elsewhere in the United States or abroad who cover the full cost of their education in higher tuition without state support. This touched off a series of stories in the major media, including the San Jose Mercury News and KQED news radio. Is this fair? Who is to blame? On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend. Listen to the show.

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

SJSU Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

In the past, this time of year was when SJSU accepted applications for spring admissions, mostly from community college transfer students, but also from graduate students entering programs accepting newcomers in the middle of the academic year. Beginning in 2009, when SJSU was hit by severe budget cuts, spring admissions varied depending on the budget situation and the number of enrolled students. This fall, SJSU has already filled every spot available to California residents for the entire academic year, meaning California residents are filling all seats supported by a combination of state and tuition dollars. So SJSU opened spring admissions to only non-resident graduate students from elsewhere in the United States or abroad who cover the full cost of their education in higher tuition without state support. This touched off a series of stories in the major media, including the San Jose Mercury News and KQED news radio. Is this fair? Who is to blame? On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend. Listen to the show.

CSU logo

Ten CSU Campuses to Accept Limited Applications for Admission in Spring 2013

CSU logo

Due to severe budget cuts, SJSU is unable to accept applications for admission from California residents for state funded programs for spring 2013. Alternatives include San Francisco State, CSU East Bay and Sonoma State.

Budget cuts force the reduction of enrollment to match available funding

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

(July 30, 2012) – Severe budget cuts over the past several years and the prospect of an additional $250 million trigger cut will limit new student applications to only 10 California State University campuses for the spring 2013 application period. Applications to those campuses will be limited primarily to students who have earned an Associate Degree for Transfer from a California Community College. For the spring 2013 application period, only Channel Islands, Chico, Fullerton, East Bay, Humboldt, Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Francisco and Sonoma will be accepting applications from prospective new students. Due to California budget restrictions, SJSU will meet our enrollment capacity prior to the Spring 2013 application term. Consequently, SJSU will not be accepting any applications for admission from California residents for state funded programs for spring 2013. Graduate and undergraduate international applicants with an F1 or J1 visa type can submit an application for spring 2013 using the international application. U.S. residents who are not California residents can submit an application from August 1 through September 30, 2012. CSU Mentor, Cal State’s admissions website, is always an applicant’s first and best source of information. Read a related news release. View the CSU Budget Central website, the SJSU Budget Central website, or current SJSU tuition and campus fees.

CSU logo

California State University Considers Budget Alternatives

CSU logo

Governor's May Revision Avoids Direct Cuts to CSU

System outlines options dependent on Governor’s tax measure

Media Contacts: Claudia Keith or Mike Uhlenkamp, (562) 951-4800

(July 16, 2012) – With the state budget for 2012-13 now signed, the California State University Board of Trustees will discuss budget options for the system at its regularly scheduled board meeting tomorrow. The final budget relies on the successful passage of the Governor’s tax measure in November. University officials will lay out the difficult budget choices if voters don’t approve the measure and the CSU faces an additional $250 million mid-year “trigger” cut. Options include strategies to reduce payroll costs, a “triggered” mid-year tuition fee increase, enrollment reductions, and other ideas will all be part of the contingencies considered. View the CSU Budget Central website, the SJSU Budget Central website, or current SJSU tuition and campus fees.

“These are all difficult challenges and choices that the CSU must consider to address our severe budget situation,” said Robert Turnage, assistant vice chancellor for budget.

Facing a nearly $16 billion deficit, the state budget adopted by the legislature and the Governor keeps the CSU’s budget essentially flat. However, should the Governor’s tax measure fail, the CSU will face an additional $250 million mid-year “trigger” cut. In that event, the system will have lost almost $1.2 billion or 39% of its state support since 2007-08.

Over the past several months, the CSU has been meeting and holding consultative discussions with its stakeholders to gather input and feedback on budget options. While the board will consider strategies to address the budget problem at its July meeting, it isn’t expected to make final decisions on a contingency budget plan until it meets in September.

Ongoing Budget Deficit
As a result of drastic state budget cuts and increases in mandatory costs such as employee health care premiums, the CSU has a funding gap of approximately $510 million. This is despite increases in tuition fee revenue of $593 million that have only partially filled the hole created by more than $1 billion in state funding reductions.

In addition, the budget just approved has an option for a delayed tuition buy out that appropriates $125 million in next year’s budget, but only if the Governor’s tax measure passes and if the CSU board rolls back the tuition increase already in effect for fall 2012. The CSU had expected to receive $132 million of net revenue from the tuition increase for this fiscal year, and the 23 campuses have already built their budgets and planned course schedules based on this revenue. The system is working to identify a solution to replace the lost revenue for the current fiscal year.

Although the campuses and the Chancellor’s Office have implemented numerous cost reduction actions – including furloughs and a workforce reduction of more than 3,000 employees – a large portion of the funding gap has been covered by one-time resources and deferrals.

“We are at the point where the use of one-time funds to address ongoing budget cuts is not sustainable,” said CSU Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer Benjamin Quillian. “It is not possible to continue to patch over budget holes. We need to take actions that reduce our costs going forward. That is the only way we will be able to serve students with the classes and support services that they need.”

Staff will present two alternative strategies to address a potential $250 million mid-year “trigger” cut with both options sharing components including reducing salaries or increasing employees’ share of benefit costs; reducing faculty assigned time and sabbaticals; charging for excess units, and the use of continuing education funds and other one-time resources. One option preserves access by not cutting enrollment while the other relies on larger payroll reductions by maintaining tuition fee levels.

“Trigger on trigger”
Under this option, the board would authorize at its September meeting a contingency mid-year tuition fee increase of $150 per semester or about 5% that would be “triggered” if the CSU faces a $250 million cut if the tax initiative fails. There would be no incremental set aside for financial aid since that would require a larger increase to generate the same net revenue, and would result in a larger burden for students without significant financial aid. The CSU already provides almost $700 million in tuition subsidies for students with the greatest financial need. There would also be no further enrollment reductions under this approach.

Employee pay/benefit reductions
Since 85% of CSU’s budget is personnel related, reductions in employee pay or increases in the amount employees pay for benefits will need to be considered. Options include systemwide reductions in personnel costs that could be achieved through negotiated reductions in employee salaries, or alternatively, through greater cost-sharing of health benefit premiums.

Reduce enrollment/reduce faculty and staff positions
If the CSU’s budget is cut an additional $250 million and no new tuition fee increase is implemented, the CSU would need to reduce 2013-14 enrollment by 6,000 students, and eliminate the associated 750 faculty/staff positions.

Faculty Assigned Time and Sabbaticals
Campuses have reduced assigned time, but further prioritization of non-teaching activities could result in savings of up to $25 million.

Third Level Pricing Structure
All of the new pricing strategies would provide more room for incoming students, help students progress to degree, and ensure that diminishing state resources are used to effectively serve as many students as possible.

Specifics include:

  • Charging for the full cost of any units over 16 per semester
  • Charging a “course repeat” fee for any single class taken by a student more than once
  • Implementing a graduation incentive fee for “super seniors” who have already taken five years worth of academic credit funded by the state
  • Increase tuition supplement for nonresident students by $1,000

One Time Transfer of Continuing Education Reserves
Both approaches include a transfer of approximately $75 million from CSU’s Continuing Education Revenue Fund. This would provide significant relief to the “state side” of the university for 2012-13 but would be one-time and restricted to that fiscal year.

The board will also take action on a resolution to endorse the Governor’s tax measure.

###

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 427,000 students and 44,000 faculty and staff. The CSU awards about 99,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million. The CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces. The mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever changing needs of the people of California. With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California. Connect with and learn more about the CSU at CSU Social Media. Show how the CSU matters to you and take action.