Nursing Student Rallies SJSU to Erect Peace Pole

Photo: Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group

Photo: Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group

Inspired by her belief in world peace, a nursing student rallied the SJSU community to install and unveil its very own Peace Pole.

Navpreet Kaur, ’17 Nursing, delivered the keynote address at the unveiling of SJSU’s newest monument Oct. 12.

A crowd of students, faculty and staff gathered along a busy walkway between Tower Hall and a grove of trees and roses near Clark Hall to hear from her.

“I believe we do have the potential to reach peace. It’s just a very difficult process,” she said.

One message, 12 languages

The Peace Pole is much smaller than SJSU’s Smith/Carlos sculpture and the Cesar E. Chavez monument, but it packs a punch.

“May Peace Prevail on Earth” is inscribed on the pole in the 12 languages most common in Santa Clara County.

Kaur was inspired to pursue the project after taking a semester off from San Jose State, and enrolling in classes at San Jose City College.

She knew nothing about Peace Poles when she stumbled upon one there. The inscription, in so many languages, intrigued her.

So she did what everyone does nowadays to record the moment: She took a photo of the pole, Instagrammed it, and then Googled it.

An international movement

Photo By Leo Reynolds

Peacemarker by Leo Reynolds / Three photos, combined.

She learned that the Peace Pole movement was born in post World War II Japan. Today, there are more than 200,000 poles worldwide.

“I remember just feeling an instant connection, and I thought I wanted to see this on my home campus,” Kaur said.

Back at SJSU, Kaur spent a day contacting everyone she could, from the president on down, until she got a reply.

The response came from Aditya Mairal, ’17 Mechanical Engineering. At the time, he was the Associated Students director of intercultural affairs.

“I gave her that push and told her that ‘yes, you can do this,’” Mairal said to Spartan Daily.

Kaur took that to heart, and her dream came true, with a good dose of mentoring from The Valley Foundation School of Nursing Director Katherine Abriam-Yago.

A faculty mentor

“She was just a constant support system,” Kaur said. “She would tell me, ‘This is your idea and if you’re envisioning it in a certain way, then you need to fight for that vision.’”

Raised in East San Jose’s cultural melting pot, Kaur was particularly concerned about the languages.

“My number one goal was to make sure there was no bias with the language selection,” she said, so she turned to U.S. Census data to keep the peace.

Interestingly, one reason she is drawn to nursing is, in her eyes, it’s also all about mediation.

“A lot of the time, patients don’t express what their true concerns are in fear of being judged by their healthcare professionals,” she said. “As a nurse, I am an advocate for my patient. I’m an advocate for their concerns. Standing up for those who are afraid to raise their voice is a beautiful thing.”


VTA light rail

Stand Up for Transportation Rally


The visual centerpiece of the event will be a 60-foot wrapped Valley Transportation Authority bus (VTA image).

Media contact: Brandi Childress, VTA Public Information Officer, 408-464-7810

San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, Santa Clara County Supervisor Dave Cortese and Valley Transportation Authority General Manager and CEO Nuria Fernandez will “Stand Up for Transportation” at 10 a.m. April 9 outside the SJSU Event Center near South Seventh and East San Salvador streets.

On national Stand Up for Transportation Day, officials across the country will call on Congress to renew funding for the federal transportation program called Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act, also known as MAP-21.

The Bus

The visual centerpiece of the event will be a 60-foot wrapped VTA bus. Federal funding allowed VTA to purchase new, hybrid diesel-electric buses to replace aging, less energy-efficient diesel buses.

VTA’s BART Silicon Valley Project broke ground in 2012 largely due to $900 million in federal New Starts funding. Now in its third year of construction, BART to San Jose is expected to serve 23,000 riders when completed in 2017.


San Jose State faculty, staff and students with ID ride VTA buses and light rail at no cost thanks to an agreement between VTA and the Associated Students of SJSU.

Approximately 12,470 riders took part in the program in 2013. Students driving alone to campus decreased from 60 percent in 2001 to 33 percent in 2013, according to the SJSU Annual Sustainability Report.

Read more on the event.

vote button

SJSU and the 2014 Elections

"vote" button

A professor and student will serve as panelists at the Honda-Khanna debate, and SJSU will be the venue for a San Jose mayoral debate.

Media Contact: Pat Harris, 408-924-1748
Logistics Contact: Fernanda P. Karp, 408-924-1162

San Jose, CA—San Jose State will play important roles in debates between candidates in two pivotal races in the run-up to the November elections.

An SJSU professor and student will serve as panelists when the 17th Congressional District candidates – Mike Honda and Ro Khanna –discuss a wide range of topics relevant to Silicon Valley and the South Bay beginning at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 6.  The event will be closed to the public but broadcasted live from the NBC Bay Area newsroom.

Associate Professor of Political Science Melinda Jackson and Associated Students Director of External Affairs LooLoo Amante will pose questions to the candidates, along with representatives from the Huffington Post and KQED.

Retired SJSU Professor of Political Science Larry Gerston and NBC Bay Area Anchor Raj Mathai will conclude the broadcast with a post-debate analysis.

Candidates for Congress

“This race is one of the hottest in the nation for a couple of reasons,” Jackson said. “First of all, it pits two Democrats against each othera popular seven-term incumbent backed by the party establishment and a young challenger with the endorsement of many Silicon Valley tech firms. So it is both a generational contest, and an old-guard versus new-guard battle.

“Second, this is the first majority-Asian-American congressional district in the nation, outside of Hawaii, and the race features a Japanese-American candidate versus an Indian-American. If Khanna were to unseat Honda, it would also signal the growing political influence of the Indian-American community in California. Whatever happens on November 4th, this will be an exciting race to watch!”

To Amante, having a college student leader on the panel presents an excellent opportunity to share the concerns and needs of people her age.

“As a young voter, I want to know they are taking into consideration and addressing the issues college students are dealing with during their campaigns and, if elected, in office,” she said. “It’s great to add a student because it adds diversity in age to the group of panelists.”

Candidates for Mayor

The San Jose mayoral candidates – Dave Cortese and Sam Liccardo – will present their visions for the city that is home to this university at 6 p.m. Oct. 9 in Morris Daily Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public but registration is required.

The moderator will be Gabriel Metcalf, executive director of SPUR, a nonprofit focusing on urban issues. Founded in San Francisco, the organization opened a San Jose office two years ago, citing this city as “an important location for forward-thinking urban policy.”

“San Jose, the nation’s 10th largest city, is on the cusp of explosive growth, projecting to add nearly half a million people in the next 30 years,” SPUR said. “What happens in the next decade will affect current and future citizens for decades to come.”

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,740 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

spartan logo

Associated Students Launches Campus-to-the-City Initiative

Have you seen the Spartan at South Ninth and East San Fernando?

Measuring 15 feet across, the large symbol was installed Sept. 15. It’s the product of the Associated Students of SJSU’s Campus-to-the-City initiative.

“The goal is to bring Spartan pride into downtown and surrounding sections of the city so that SJSU is recognizable not just on campus but in the entire area,” said Mykel Jeffrey, ’15 Political Science and A.S. director of internal affairs.

spartan logo

The Spartan logo near the Student Services Center is part of an effort to build a sense of community (photo courtesy of A.S.).

The initiative began with last year’s A.S. board, headed by then-President Nicholas Ayala, ’14 Management Information Systems, who was inspired by a similar effort at other campuses.

Cultivating community

“Cultivating Spartan pride beyond SJSU’s walls will help students feel more at home while they’re in school and help foster the everlasting memories they’ll want to come back to and revisit as alumni,” Ayala said.

More than 40 street banners will be installed this fall. The buffer zone around bike lanes will take on a gold-and-blue hue this spring. With both projects, A.S. seeks to connect the main and south campuses to foster a sense of community and safety.

Next year may bring three more Spartan symbols to intersections around campus. But first, officials would like to see how the initial Spartan stands up to wear and tear over the next six months.

Practical experience

The initiative has been a lesson in how to get things done in a complex city. The A.S. board has been working with the San Jose Department of Transportation and Office of Cultural Affairs. The group has also met with the Office of the Mayor and Councilmember and mayor candidate Sam Liccardo.

“This doesn’t feel like a college town (and) we’re trying to change that,” Liccardo told the Spartan Daily. “I know this is something folks have been trying to do in various ways…this is needed.”

Cesar Chavez Day: Spartans Embrace Activism

Cesar Chavez Day: Spartans Embrace Activism

Cesar Chavez Day: Spartans Embrace Activism

The César E. Chávez Monument: Arch of Dignity, Equality and Justice on the grounds of San Jose State (Bruce Cramer photo).

In a world with more than eight billion people, just one can make a difference when a life is used to better someone else’s. “I have a button that says ‘one person can do so much’,” said Leila McCabe ’12 Sociology . “I feel like it’s my duty to help improve people’s lives, but I love doing that.” McCabe, and others such as Elisha St. Laurent, ’13 Behavioral Science and Sociology, were among some of the students who campaigned to raise the minimum wage in San Jose starting in 2011. Though the campaign recently celebrated its one-year anniversary, they have not stopped fighting for the rights of others.

Workers rights and activism flowing throughout the nation

Workers rights has been a debated topic for decades with advocates such as Cesar Chavez, in the 1950s and 1960s, marching and working to see employees given proper wages and working conditions. Chavez is honored with a holiday that falls during SJSU’s Spring Break, and Maribel Martinez, department manager of the Cesar Chavez Community Action Center, said Cesar Chavez Day is an opportunity for people to honor his legacy and serve. “We host a service day,” she said. “We encourage people to come out and volunteer.”

Maribel said the CCCAC and volunteers will work with Veggielution to reconnect with the land and harvest as a way to celebrate the impact that Cesar Chavez made in the San Jose community.

McCabe said as an SJSU alumna, its part of her “lineage” to be inspired by those such as Chavez, who sacrificed time and strength for workers rights. She, as an activist, does not sit down when she sees a moment to serve. Now part of the Raise the Wage East Bay campaign, McCabe said “the fact that I’m still able to do this work is kind of amazing. It’s probably best thing I’ve done in my life.” McCabe explained that some doubted that she and her peers could make a difference in a complicated issue such as workers rights and the raising of minimum wage but looking back, they were in some ways pioneers for a now national discussion. “People literally told us we were crazy that it was not the right time to do it.”

Serving: A way of life

McCabe said though generation X can be a generation that works for self interest, she has begun to see a shift in her group of friends, as people look to be part of  social justice issues and campaigns.

St. Laurent, who also worked on the Measure D campaign, said though people such as Chavez are highlighted when talking about people who make a difference in social justice issues, there are others who selflessly serve. “We’re all tired … The idea of actually getting up and wanting to empower [your] community or wanting to be a part of [your] community  just on [Cesar Chavez day] or one week is great, but you should wake up every day like that, wanting to help people because every day people wake up homeless,” St. Laurent said. She said time is precious and she has often sacrificed time for herself for others because any day can be a chance to change someone’s life. “I make time because God made time for me … It took me realizing that my life should be of servitude to others,” she said.

McCabe said it’s her passion to help others, and she feels empowered to see change in her community. “I can’t not try to make a difference when I know that we have the power to make change,” she said.

SJSU queen

SJSU Homecoming Goes Viral

SJSU Homecoming Goes Viral

Homecoming king and queen Daniel Harris-Lucas and Diana Busaka were selected based on their achievements and contributions to the campus community (Brandon Chew photo).

By the Associated Students of San Jose State University

San Jose, Calif. – San Jose State made national headlines last weekend for crowning the first African-American homecoming king and queen. However, Associated Students, the host behind the tradition, is not surprised by the selection.

Just one week prior to Homecoming, Dr. Harry Edwards — advocate for human and civil rights — spoke at the SJSU Legacy Week rally, and quoted Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech, highlighting the importance of judging people based on the content of their character, and not the color of their skin.

Daniel Harris-Lucas and Diana Busaka were selected because of their relentless work ethic, academic success and devotion to helping students and community. They serve as role-models to SJSU students of all socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.

Merit-based honor

NBC Bay Area, The Huffington Post and other major news outlets picked up story, but left out that homecoming king and queen is more than a crown, title, or contest that you win based off of popularity or race.

“We started seeking applications in September,” said Brea Watts, assistant marketing coordinator at A.S. “Our marketing department, with help from the Dwight Bentel & Hall student-run public relations/advertising agency on campus, used special props and social media to increase awareness about homecoming, and encourage students to apply to be recognized for their achievements.

Candidates go through a rigorous selection process of applications and interviews, and win their title based on merit. The SJSU community and national news outlets across the nation should focus on the contributions that Harris and Busaka have made, just as they did with Latino, Asian, and other diverse groups that have won in the past.”

Although Harris, a 22-year-old public relations major from Oakland, California ran because of lack of African-American male representation on the court previous years, his ultimate goal was to prove “that all the struggling and adversity that I had gone through did not determine my life.”

Busaka, on the other hand was encouraged to apply through the support of her close friends, and felt a need to step out of her comfort zone.  While completing the application, she became aware of how dedicated she has been to students and the campus community.

Dedication to the campus community

“I was truly amazed and proud to see the long list of accomplishments I have made at SJSU,” she said.

Their skin color was a milestone for the diverse population at San Jose State, but their resumes, achievements, cover letters, and charisma are the real heroes at work.

“The media may have been surprised, but A.S. is committed to supporting students of all racial, ethnic, and economic backgrounds,” Watts said. “We are excited our students received mass media attention, and hope that this inspires fellow Spartans.”




The Huffington Post: San Jose State University Crowns First Black Homecoming King And Queen

Posted by The Huffington Post Oct. 30, 2013.

By Lydia O’Connor

California’s oldest university just named its first black homecoming king and queen.

Seniors Daniel Harris-Lucas and Diana Busaka were crowned Thursday night at San Jose State University, beating out 22 other applicants who all submitted a nomination, two letters of recommendation, a personal statement, a resumé and newsclips about them.

“It’s a great accomplishment,” Harris-Lucas told NBC Bay Area. “But it’s probably overdue. I’m glad to be part of history. But this probably should have happened years ago.”

Legacy Week Features Sports Justice Legend

Sporting Legend to Headline Legacy Week

Legacy Week Features Sports Justice Legend

Dr. Harry Edwards, pictured here at the 2012 EOP Graduation, will return to campus for Legacy Week, Oct. 15-18 (Christina Olivas photo).

Dr. Harry Edwards, ’64 Sociology, will be the keynote speaker at the Legacy Week Noontime Rally Oct. 16 at the Smith Carlos Sculpture.

Edwards was a mentor to Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who were San Jose State students when they took a stand for human rights at the 1968 Olympics, a moment immortalized by the sculpture.

Much is said about SJSU’s engineering and business colleges powering Silicon Valley. However, SJSU also prepares students to take a critical look at the world around them, engage in meaningful dialogue, and work toward finding solutions to complex issues.

Legacy Week Features Sports Justice Legend

Legacy Week activities include a Legacy Wall comprised of original student artwork (Christina Olivas photo).

Beginning Oct. 15, Legacy Week shines a spotlight on the leading role Spartans play in social justice.

Other activities include: a Legacy Wall comprised of original student artwork; the premiere of  a new film series, “Celebrity Legacy Tour: Walking the Campus with Distinguished Alums”; a Legacy Tour, with stops at campus landmarks that symbolize SJSU’s social justice history; and a Legacy Brunch with alumni leaders.

Legacy Week is organized by the Cesar E. Chavez Community Action Center, part of the Associated Students of SJSU. Learn more about Legacy Week.

SJSU Campus

10 Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

SJSU Campus

Soon to be at your service: a new student health center, an expanded Student Union and an updated SPX (Christina Olivas photo).

1. You’re in good company. This fall, we’re expecting 31,300 enrolled students, including 3,700 first-time freshmen, 3,700 new transfers, 2,000 new graduate students and 2,000 new and returning international students.

2. Our faculty members are the finest, including 26 new tenure-track instructors across the disciplines, from design to psychology to cybersecurity.

3. We’re building 21st century spaces. Phase 1 of the Student Union is near completion. Mojo Burger anyone? Coming soon: A new Student Health and Counseling Center and an updated Spartan Complex.

4. We power Silicon Valley. Check out these Spartans at Work and visit the SJSU Career Center to start your job search.

5. We are making it easier to get classes when you need them, offering online courses for credit from other CSU campuses.

6. We’re helping and caring. Need a hand? Just ask students, faculty and staff wearing an “Ask Me” button.

7. With more than 400 clubs, we offer something for everyone. Learn more at Fall Welcome Days, including the Student Organization Fair Aug. 28 on Tower Lawn.

8. We’re going green. Check out the EcoPass, bike share and car share programs.

9. We can dance!

10. We’re connected on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest, plus we offer safety updates via text messages through Alert SJSU.

Spartan Squad Students

Spartan Squad Kicks Off 2013-14 Season

Spartan Squad Students

The Spartan Squad Kick-Off, free t-shirts FTW!

Get ready for the first home game of the 2013 football season with free shirts and activities at the eighth annual Spartan Squad Kick-Off 6 p.m. Aug. 28 in the Campus Village Quad. Along with free t-shirts, students with ID can enjoy games, prizes, ice cream and Spartan Spirit. Spartan Squad Kick-Off is an annual tradition aimed at getting students excited for the upcoming football season and other athletic events throughout the year. Spartan Squad was created in 2005 by a group of students to increase pride and school spirit on campus. For more information about Spartan Squad Kick-Off, joining Spartan Squad and other events, contact Associated Students Event Coordinator Bradyn Blower at 408-924-6269.


Sammy Spartan in class

Cramming? We’re Here to Help!

Sammy Spartan in class

It’s time to take those exams! Go Sammy go!

Check out all the exam week specials offered by Parking Services, King Library, Spartan Shops, Spartan Bookstore, Associated Students and Housing Services:

“Any holders of park-and-ride permits or one-day-a-week or two-day-a-week parking permits can park on campus May 15 through May 22. So even if you don’t have a full-price permit, you can park in campus garages during exam week. The park-and-ride shuttles will operate Wed., May 15, through Tues., May 21.” — Denny Yau, Parking Services assistant manager

“King Library will be open all night during much of exam week. Get the details here. On Fourth Cafe will be open until midnight on May 14, 15, 16, 19 and 20. Before cafe workers leave for the night, they will set up a free coffee stand for students hitting the books through the night. On May 17, the cafe closes at 5 p.m., so coffee will be available beginning around 5:30 p.m.” — Bridget Kowalczyk, King Library senior assistant librarian

“Spartan Shops is ready to help you prepare for finals! Our eateries will have special, extended hours during finals week, including On Fourth Cafe which will close at midnight for everyone studying late at King Library. To start the first day of finals, find our Nesquik team in front of the Village Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wed., May 15, and get a free bottle of Nesquik chocolate milk! Plus, find pencils, scantrons, green books, and drinks at our various dining locations.” — Stephanie Fabian, Spartan Shops marketing manager

“The Spartan Bookstore is here for all of your exam and graduation needs!! We have blue books, scantrons, pencils and smiling employees ready to wish you the best on your final exams! For your convenience, we will be open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sat., May 18 and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sat., May 25. Good Luck Spartans!!” — Ryland Metzinger, Spartan Bookstore director

“Students can usually find a quiet space in the A.S. House Fireside Room during business hours. The A.S. Student Programming Board hands out snacks and other giveaways across campus during exam week. The Computer Services Center will open early at 7:30 a.m., and the Print Shop will be open extended hours 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fri., May 24.” — Kelli Williams, Associated Students associate executive director

“In order to better meet the study needs of all housing residents, the Living Learning Center (LLC) located on the first floor of Campus Village Building B has expanded its hours during finals. The LLC will now be open from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. daily through Tues., May 21. This space is designed for group and individual study, with quiet study after 8 p.m.” — Stephanie G. Hubbard, Residential Life associate director

Commencement is right around the corner! Check out what Sammy’s been up to as he prepares to graduate.

Join Bike to Work Day 2012!

Bike to Work (or School) Day May 9

Bike to Work (or School!) Day May 9

When you get here, stop by the energizer station outside King Library for free bicycle helmets, snacks and more (Transportation Solutions photo).

Transportation Solutions, brought to you by the Associated Students of SJSU, wants you to leave your car behind and hit the road on two wheels May 9. When you get here, stop by the energizer station sponsored by the city of San Jose and SJSU outside King Library at East San Fernando and South Fourth streets. They’ll be offering free bicycle helmets, snacks and more, so get some exercise and bike to campus! The weather will be great! Learn more about Bike to Work Day. 

Trashion Fashion

Associated Students hosted a Trashion Fashion Show the evening of April 23 in the Campus Village quad. The event raises awareness by inviting students to create and model their own garments made from at least 80 percent post-consumer materials. Students modeled trendy spring styles provided by a local recycled clothing store. And Carlos Escobar picked up the Greenest Greek Award on behalf of Delta Sigma Phi, which clocked the lowest carbon footprint per capita among all fraternities and sororities.


Associated Students Elections: Don’t Let Three Percent Decide

Associated Students Elections: Don’t Let Three Percent Decide

Associated Students Elections: Don’t Let Three Percent Decide

Get out and VOTE!! Students can learn about the candidates, the smoking initiative and the fee referenda on the ballot this year at the open forums, debates and events scheduled April 2-4.

Contact: Brea Watts, 408-924-6264

San Jose, Calif.— In 2012, only three percent of the entire student body participated in student elections, or a meager 983 students.  If this rate continues in 2013, only three percent of all San Jose State students will be deciding much more than who will take a seat on the next Associated Students’ Board of Directors.

What makes 2013 more critical than previous years is students will decide whether SJSU will become a smoke-free campus. Additionally, students will decide whether to approve three proposed fee increases totaling $11, a decision the current Associated Students board wants to leave up to the entire student body.  It has been 12 years since student government has proposed an increase to its fellow students.

The board’s message is simple: Don’t let three percent decide. Get out and VOTE!!  Students can learn about the candidates, the smoking initiative and the fee referenda on the ballot this year at the open forums, debates and events scheduled April 2-4.  Voting begins April 8 and ends the morning of April 10.  The final voting results will be announced that afternoon.

Check out the Voter Information Guide, available at Student Involvement in Clark Hall, at the Associated Students House, and online on the Student Elections Commission website.


Taking the First Step

Contact: Brea Watts, Associated Students Marketing Associate, 408-924-6264

Associated Students of SJSU is taking a new approach to its annual elections by grabbing attention with chalk outlines, print posters and digital messaging urging students to take the first step toward running for the board.

It is worth noting these are paid positions.  Successful candidates will earn $500 monthly for director positions and $1,000 monthly for executive officers. The deadline to apply is March 1 and voting will be held April 8-10.

The campaign was launched this month via webpage, newsletter, social media, posters and chalking in high traffic areas, along with targeted ads in each college matching positions to their corresponding majors.

The surge in marketing stems from hours of brainstorming and innovation from the graphics and marketing department at A.S. and the Student Elections Commission to increase the awareness of the board positions and get students to run.

A.S. Board of Directors are students leaders who make decisions regarding policies, procedures and funding in the interest of the general student body.

Elections are held each spring, and students are encouraged to run for positions to gain valuable business experience while advocating the rights and concerns of their peers.

Applications for the board and the Executive Committee are available at the A.S. House, Student Involvement office, on the Student Elections Commission homepage and A.S. website.

Students Learn #ItCanWait

Did you know…

  • taking your eyes off the interstate to read a text is like driving blind for the length of a football field?
  • driving while texting is like piloting a 3,000-pound metal missile with your eyes closed?
  • more than 100,000 crashes annually involve drivers who are texting?
  • drivers who text are almost 25 times more likely to crash?

Speakers shared these facts and more at a “Txtng & Drivng… It Can Wait” news conference Jan. 25 in the SJSU Event Center. Vice President for Student Affairs William Nance opened the event by recalling his response when AT&T offered to help: “I said, ‘Absolutely, we’ll figure out how and when to do it.’” AT&T Regional Vice President for External Affairs Marc Blakeman announced an Apple version of DriveMode is in the works. This Android and Blackberry app sends auto-replies to people who text, email and call while you’re on the road so you can keep your hands on the wheel. University Police Department Chief of Police Peter Decena, San Jose Police Department Commander of Traffic Enforcement Jason Ta and SJPD Officer Jim Hagen (all SJSU alumni!) noted police will hold 23 texting and driving enforcement events this year.  Associated Students of SJSU President Calvin Worsnup was the first of many to take a spin on AT&T’s texting and driving simulator, which looks alot like an arcade driving game equipped with a cell phone for texting. Some students were super cautious, both most crashed within minutes. KGO Bay Area News, the San Jose Mercury News, Spartan Daily and Update News covered the event to help spread the word. To learn more, check out the “Txtng & Drivng… It Can Wait” website, where you can watch videos and take the pledge “to never txt and drive.”

Olympian Headlines Legacy Week Celebration

Olympian Headlines Legacy Week Celebration

Olympian John Carlos Headlines Legacy Week Celebration

The campus ignites Wednesday, when 1968 Olympic Games bronze medalist John Carlos will deliver the keynote address for Legacy Week at the sculpture commemorating his stand for human rights.

Media Contact: Maribel Martinez, 408-924-4143

SAN JOSE, Calif. – The Associated Students Cesar Chavez Community Action Center (CCCAC) presents the Seventh Annual Legacy Week at San Jose State starting Monday, Oct. 15. The campus ignites on Wednesday during the annual Legacy Rally, where 1968 Olympic Games bronze medalist Dr. John Carlos is set to deliver the keynote speech at noon. After the rally, students and the community are invited take a group photo with Carlos at the Smith/Carlos sculpture, which was unveiled in 2005 to commemorate their legacies.

Over four decades ago, John Carlos and gold medalist Tommie Smith, both Spartans, raised their fists and bowed their heads in front of the world on the Olympic stage in Mexico City as the National Anthem played, representing their fight for freedom, equal rights, and unity. It was one of the most controversial and powerful moments in history, creating an image that will forever symbolize the American civil rights movement.

Monday kicks off Legacy Week at the Legacy Wall in front of Clark Hall, where students can make and hang posters representing their passion for various human rights issues, and the week continues with a series of film screenings, community debates, and teach-ins. The week wraps up with the annual Poverty Under the Stars event, where students are invited to sleep out at the statue in solidarity with those less fortunate.

Due to the high demand of Legacy t-shirts in 2011, this year the CCCAC is launching a new Legacy Line of clothing and merchandise with a new look at the well-known image of Smith and Carlos in blue and gold. Legacy shirts will be available in the SJSU bookstore throughout October, and a percentage of the proceeds directly supporting the CCCAC and future programs.

Associated Students, whose mission is to represent the students of SJSU and continually improve the quality of their educational opportunities and experiences, is bringing Carlos to campus to honor the work of all student activists and community leaders and to give students the unique opportunity to meet one of the most well-known alumni of San Jose State. For more information about Associated Students, Legacy Week, or other programs of the CCCAC, please visit the A.S. website.

Legacy Week Public Calendar of Events

Monday, October 15

  • Legacy Wall Poster Making/Hanging, noon – 5 p.m. at the sculpture: Students can make a Legacy poster (8 1/2” by 11” up to 4′ by 4′) that addresses one of the sculpture themes, such as racism, sexism, oppression, poverty, human rights, equality or peace and nonviolence.
  • Film Screening, “Fists of Freedom: The Story of the ’68 Summer Games”, noon to 3 p.m. at MOSAIC in the Student Union. Documentary film leading up to, during and after the 1968 Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City. Features interviews with athletes, including John Carlos, Tommie Smith and George Foreman, activist Dr. Harry Edwards, journalists and archival footage of the games and the fallout after Carlos and Smith took a stand for human rights. Running time one hour.

Tuesday, October 16

  • Elections 2012 Teach-in and community debate, ENG 189
  • Measure D and Prop. 30 Teach-in, 9 – 10:15 a.m.
  • Propositions 34, 35, and 36 Teach-in, 1:30 – 2:45 p.m.
  • Measure D & Prop. 30 Community Debate, 7 – 9 p.m.

Wednesday, Oct. 17

  • Legacy Rally/John Carlos Keynote, noon – 1:15 p.m., Smith/Carlos Sculpture
  • Photo with John Carlos, 1:15 p.m., Smith/Carlos Sculpture
  • Book signing (The John Carlos Story), 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Smith/Carlos Sculpture

Thursday, Oct. 18

  • Poverty Under the Stars, 6 p.m. – 9 a.m. at the Smith/Carlos Sculpture. Tent set-up Noon. A seventh annual event where students sleep out in solidarity with people who are in poverty. This year, the event will focus on minimum wage workers. Contact Elisha St. Laurent at if students want to sleep out. Students can also just attend the 6 – 8 p.m. event that will feature guest speakers, an improv play, spoken word, and a movie.

More information about John Carlos



Associated Students Launches Voter Registration Campaign

Why Vote? You Fill in the Blank, and Then Register Today!

Why vote? You fill in the blank! Starting next week, Associated Students will be setting up voter registration tables all over campus. Pick up your button, fill out the paperwork or get it done right now with Turbovote (Christina Olivas photo).

By Larry Carr, Associate Vice President of Public Affairs

How easy is it to register to vote in this November’s election? So easy you can do just about everything right now on your smartphone!

TurboVote makes the whole process as easy as renting a DVD from Netflix, plus the service will send text and email reminders so that you don’t miss elections.

You fill out a form online, and then TurboVote mails you a completed vote-by-mail application or registration form along with a pre-addressed, stamped envelope.

This comes at no cost to Spartans, thanks to support from the Associated Students of SJSU and the SJSU Office of Public Affairs.

Register Online or in Person

Or look for the Associated Student tables across campus where you can register, get your button expressing “Why I Vote,” and sign banners with the issues that are important to you.

Volunteers will be available to help from the beginning of the semester until Oct. 22, the last day to register for November’s general election.

Whether you simply think it’s the right thing to do or you want to put an end to the tuition increases that come with SJSU budget cuts, now is the time to take that first step. Register today.

Update: Associated Students Server Security Breach

Update: Associated Students Server Security Breach

Update: Associated Students Server Security Breach

Although the risk of identity theft is low, phishing scams are possible. This means you should read incoming email carefully, and avoid clicking on links asking you to update your username and password. Emails that ask for your login information are scams.

Media Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, 408-656-6998

On June 26, SJSU learned a hacker breached an Associated Students of SJSU server. Please note the breach affected Associated Students only. SJSU employee data and MySJSU are completely separate and were not affected. Therefore, the breach will not impact fall 2012 registration and did not result in the release of thousands of student Social Security numbers or student ID passwords as suggested by the media.

However, we must warn you that hackers may have accessed names, home addresses, email addresses, telephone numbers and student ID numbers, but absolutely no corresponding passwords, for students from 2003 to present. Also, hackers may have accessed approximately 200 student driver’s license numbers. We will do our best to notify every impacted individual.

Although the risk of identity theft is low, phishing scams are possible. This means you should read incoming email carefully, and avoid clicking on links asking you to update your username and password. Emails that ask for your login information are scams.

The SJSU information security officer is working with Associated Students to implement improvements to the A.S. server. We apologize for the delay in contacting you. We have been reviewing every aspect of the A.S. server with the goal of providing you with accurate information.

Please report any suspicious activity to the University Police Department at 408-924-2222. UPD has opened an investigation, and will report this case to federal authorities.

We know you may have questions or concerns. Please feel free to contact the SJSU Public Affairs office at 408-924-1166 or