“Spartan East Side Promise” to Prepare East Side Students for SJSU Admissions

Media contacts:
Linda Ornelas, ESUHSD Marketing and Public Engagement Director, 408-347-5014, ornelasl@esuhsd.org
Connie Skipitares, SVEF Media Relations Manager, 408-790-9593, connie@svef.com
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations Director, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – An initiative that fosters a college-going culture in East San Jose schools and promises to help prepare students for admission to San Jose State University will be unveiled at a formal “promise signing” next week.

WHAT:  Spartan East Side Promise
WHEN:  9:30 – 10:15 a.m Friday, April 29
WHERE:  W.C. Overfelt High School, Room F5, 1835 Cunningham Ave., San Jose, CA 95122

Collaboration

Remarks will be offered by East Side students, SJSU Interim President Susan Martin, East Side Union High School District Superintendent Chris D. Funk and Silicon Valley Education Foundation CEO Muhammed Chaudhry.

The “Spartan East Side Promise” provides a pathway to admission to SJSU by clearly specifying admissions requirements and actively sharing this information with students and families at the 13 high schools in the East Side Union High School District.

The Spartan East Side Promise is a collaborative venture created by SJSU and ESUHSD, with support from the East Side Alliance, a network that includes ESUHSD, seven elementary feeder school districts (Alum Rock, Berryessa, Evergreen, Franklin-McKinley, Mt. Pleasant, Oak Grove, Orchard), and the Silicon Valley Education Foundation.  The East Side Alliance brings together these eight districts as an educational community to share ideas, leverage resources, and align practices to ensure every student’s success.

Admissions Pathway

In order to gain admission into SJSU, students must meet the California State University/University of California course requirements known as the “A-G” requirements — a set of 15 high school course requirements covering a range of subjects that establish a foundation for college-level work.

Students must achieve a “C” grade or better in these subjects. Students at ESUHSD this fall must also earn a 3300 eligibility Index (SAT) or 790 (ACT), and require no remediation as determined by math and English placement test scores. The eligibility index is based on grades and test scores.

By clearly articulating the specific criteria for SJSU admission as part of the Spartan East Side Promise, ESUHSD students will know what is expected early in their academic careers and can prepare to take the steps needed to ensure college admission at SJSU.

The key here is locking in the eligibility index. The EI when an East Side student enters high school will be the maximum EI when the East Side student applies for admission to SJSU. This is important because SJSU may need to make upward adjustments to the EI for other applicants, depending on the university’s capacity to admit new students.

Roles

“We want students and families to see how students can go to college and earn a degree. This program provides a clear roadmap for success,” SJSU Interim President Susan Martin said. “We are excited to collaborate with East Side Union High School District, the East Side Alliance and the Silicon Valley Education Foundation on this innovative program to serve our local students.”

SJSU will provide presentations on CSU and SJSU admission requirements to students and their families at ESUHSD schools and middle schools feeding into ESUHSD; participate in onsite college fairs; identify a specific admissions counselor and financial aid counselor for East Side students and families; offer opportunities for ESUHSD students to visit SJSU; and ensure East Side Union high schools have publications regarding SJSU admission requirements.

The ESUHSD will appoint a district sponsor to work with SJSU; provide opportunities and facilities for SJSU representatives to meet with East Side students, families, faculty and counselors; provide bus transportation for ESHUSD students to visit SJSU and tour campus; promote the Spartan East Side Promise in elementary, middle and high schools; and identify a specific contact for SJSU at each high school.

Quotes

“This is an exciting program that will provide a clear pathway into a university for students who might not otherwise gain this access,” said SVEF CEO Muhammed Chaudhry. “We are thrilled to be giving students this chance for a bright future and rewarding career opportunities ahead.”

“The Spartan East Side Promise will reinforce all our current efforts to create an environment that encourages our students to strive for college,” said Chris D. Funk, superintendent of the East Side Union High School District.

“We are excited to provide our East Side Alliance elementary students with a college pathway to a great California State University right here in their own back yard!” said Kathy Gomez, Evergreen School District superintendent,

“I want to acknowledge and thank both Interim President Sue Martin and former President Mo Qayoumi, who have been active partners with the East Side Alliance and have made the Spartan East Side Promise possible,” said Manny Barbara, SVEF coordinator of the East Side Alliance.

About the East Side Union High School District

East Side Union High School District, established in 1950, serves more than 23,000 students in grades 9-12 in San Jose, Santa Clara County (Silicon Valley). The district has approximately 2,021 employees. It has the seventh largest high school student enrollment in the state and the largest in northern California.

The district’s mission is to align decisions to create safe, dynamic and relevant learning environments that inspire critical thinking, problem solving and innovation.

 About Silicon Valley Education Foundation

Silicon Valley Education Foundation is a nonprofit resource and advocate for students and educators. We drive scholastic achievement in the critical areas of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) by combining resources and partnerships to provide innovative academic programs. We are a catalyst for policy solutions in public education. Our mission is to make Silicon Valley the leader in academically prepared students. To learn more, please visit: www.svef.com.

About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San José State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 145 areas of study with an additional 108 concentrations – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 32,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San José State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

SJSU Admits Incoming Spartans

admissions envelope

Congratulations to all our newly admitted Spartans! (image by Rachel Poage, ’14 Graphic Design).

Over the past few weeks, more than 25,000 high school and community college students across the country are ripping open envelopes arriving in the mail to find inside a “Certificate of Admission.”

It’s that time of year again, when San Jose State says yes to its incoming class of freshmen and transfers.

Excited admits

Follow the Enrollment Services’ Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts as these newly admitted students post pictures of themselves with their certificates to win the “Spartan Swag Photo Contest.”

student with admissions certificate

Congratulations, @jennwells_! (Courtesy of Jennifer Wells via Twitter)

Many excited admits have already taken to Twitter, tagging their posts with #SJSUSaidYes.

The new admits hail from all over California plus 37 more states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The largest number of admitted out-of-state students are from Washington, Hawaii and Texas.

Upcoming events

SJSU will continue to accept international applications through April 1. Admitted Spartan Day—one more chance to visit before the big decision—will be April 11.

The deadline to say yes to SJSU is May 1. Keep in mind these are provisional admissions. All candidates are subject to verification of California State University eligibility via final transcripts.

Everyone attends transfer orientation beginning in April or freshmen orientation beginning in June. Expect approximately 3,000 first-time freshmen and 3,500 undergraduate transfers on the first day of classes Aug. 20.

Admitted Spartan Day 2015

Admitted Spartan Day 2015 (image by Brandon Chew, ’14 Photojournalism)

SJSU Proposes Admissions Policy Changes

Contact:
Pat Harris, Media Relations, 408-924-1748

San Jose State University is considering changes to guidelines that would affect transfer students seeking admission to the university in fall 2016 and after. This change does not affect students who have already applied for admission to the university.

Transfers students are currently admitted based only on grade point average. SJSU is considering evaluating transfer students applying to specific programs based on their academic preparation. These students are expected to complete certain courses prior to entering SJSU at the junior level.

Our data show students are entering SJSU without fully completing the preparatory coursework, and subsequently taking longer to complete their degrees. Transfer students are enrolling in preparatory courses, limiting availability of these courses for freshman students. This change would allow more students to make timely progress to graduation.

Anyone may comment on these proposed changes. SJSU will hold three public meetings to discuss this proposed change:

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 3-5 p.m.

SJSU Student Union Theater

Monday, March 2, 2015, 3-5 p.m.

West Valley College Fox Technology Center, Room 120

Tuesday, March 3, 2015, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

SJSU Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering, Room 189

A website has been established to provide details. Comments may be submitted online.

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,740 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Helping Latino Families Plan for College

Helping Latinos Plan for College

Helping Latino Families Plan for College

Students and their families gather at the Event Center to hear from keynote speakers at a previous ALAS conference (photo courtesy of Fernanda Karp).

Organizers Seek to Boost College Attendance and Graduation Rates by Offering Latino Students and Families Information and Encouragement

Contacts:
Fernanda P. Karp, SJSU Student Affairs, (408) 924-1162
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, (408) 924-1748

SAN JOSE, Calif., — San Jose State University will collaborate with the Santa Clara County Superintendents Association, the Consulado General de Mexico en San José and the Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley to host the fourth biennial Advancing Latino/a Achievement and Success (ALAS) conference March 15 at SJSU. Almost 100 speakers and presenters will offer 1,500 Latino fifth through 10th graders and their families the information they need to prepare for college. Registration is closed, but the media is welcome to attend. (Please see schedule below.)

Helping Latino Families Plan for College

The Alum Rock Union Elementary School District Mariachi Tradicional welcomes attendees to a previous ALAS conference (photo courtesy of Fernanda Karp).

“San Jose State University is pleased to host the fourth biennial Advancing Latino/a Achievement and Success conference,” said President Mohammad Qayoumi. “SJSU is committed to accessibility and places high value in reaching out to all families as they prepare for higher education. We want to demonstrate to students and their parents that a college education is indeed attainable, especially when you start planning early for the college application process.”

Rich in Culture, Tradition, Values and Faith

The keynote speaker this year is Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch, who became the highest ranked Latina in the Combat Support Field of the U.S. Army. Kickbusch is a renowned, charismatic, passionate and influential speaker with a mission to empower the next generation of leaders. Born and raised along the border in a small barrio in Laredo, Texas, Kickbusch is all too familiar with the challenges of poverty, discrimination and illiteracy. Although she grew up without material wealth, Kickbusch was taught by her immigrant parents that she was rich in culture, tradition, values and faith.

We all are partners in the shared mission to improve college opportunities for our local K-12 students, and this conference is one example of that,” said SJSU Director of Campus and Community Relations Fernanda P. Karp. “The success of our region’s Latino and Latina students is integral to the future success of our state’s economy, and that success starts with making sure that students are aware of and prepared for getting into college.”

Prioritizing Opportunity

The idea for this conference springs from a need to increase the number of college-bound Latino students in Silicon Valley. According to the Silicon Valley Latino Report Card 2011, 14 percent of Latinos have a bachelor’s degree or higher, as compared to 52% of non-Latinos. This event also reflects the California State University External Relations mission, which includes ensuring the needs of students with the least opportunity are recognized as a high priority.

Helping Latino Families Plan for College

Students and their families attend workshops on academic skills, parental involvement, college-student life, and the long-term benefits of higher education (photo courtesy of Fernanda Karp).

“It’s never too early to start setting the course for college!” said Evergreen School District Superintendent Kathy Gomez. “Helping students and their families realize that college is not only possible — but it’s also accessible right here in San Jose — is what ALAS is all about. The Santa Clara County Superintendents Association is very happy to work with San Jose State University and our partners to help spread this message!”

The conference will begin with a formal welcome by President Qayoumi and Mexican Consul General to San Jose Carlos Ponce followed by a keynote address by Lt. Col. Ret. Castillo Kickbusch. Then, students and their families will attend workshops on campus. Topics will include academic skills, parental involvement, college-student life, and the long-term benefits of higher education.

All Santa Clara County school districts were given the opportunity to invite top Latino students. The conference title, “Advancing Latino/a Achievement and Success,” was carefully selected because its abbreviation (“ALAS”) means wings in Spanish.

***

Advancing Latina/o Achievement and Success Conference
SJSU Event Center 
March 15, 2014

8 a.m.
Welcome – President Mohammad Qayoumi, San Jose State University
Welcome – Kathy Gomez, Santa Clara County Superintendent Association and Fernanda P. Karp, San Jose State University
Welcome –Consul General Carlos Ponce, Mexican Consulate in San José
Keynote – Lt. Col. Ret. Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch
Entertainment – Alum Rock Union Elementary School District Mariachi Tradicional

10:15 a.m.
Break-Out Session #1

11:30 a.m.
Break-Out Session #2

12:30 a.m.
End of Program

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,000 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

SJSU Admits 29,000 Prospective Spartans

SJSU Admits 28,000 Prospective Spartans

SJSU Admits 29,000 Prospective Spartans

Congratulations @hip_dalys! It’s great to see SJSU is your first choice. (Image by Rachel Poage, ’14 Graphic Design)

This week, more than 28,000 high school and community college students across the country are ripping open envelopes arriving in the mail to find inside a “Certificate of Admission.”

It’s that time of year again, when San Jose State says yes to its incoming class of freshmen and transfers.

Follow the Enrollment Services’ Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts as these newly admitted students post pictures of themselves with their certificates to win the “Spartan Swag Photo Contest.”

Past participants have used their creativity to take photos with others in classrooms, while flying a plane and at a daycare center.

SJSU Admits 29,000 Prospective Spartans

Good job, Elaina Mattingly! Elaina received a consolation prize in last year’s “Spartan Swag Photo Contest.”

The new admits hail from all over California plus 39 more states, Guam and Puerto Rico. The largest number of admitted out-of-state students are from Hawaii, Washington and Texas.

SJSU will continue to accept international applications through April 1. Admitted Spartan Day–one more chance to visit before the big decision–will be April 12.

The deadline to say yes to SJSU is May 1. Keep in mind these are provisional admissions. All candidates are subject to verification of California State University eligibility via final transcripts.

Everyone attends transfer orientation beginning in April or freshmen orientation beginning in June. If last fall is any indication, expect more than 3,600 new freshmen and 3,700 new transfers on the first day of classes August 25.

More than 90 percent will be Californians, with the remaining 10 percent coming here from other states and countries.

Of course, there is a long road ahead for these new Spartans but it’s worth it. Also in the mail this week? Diplomas to fall 2013 graduates.

SJSU Admits 29,000 Prospective Spartans

Congratulations Denny! Well deserved!

 

 

Spring 2014 Begins

Ask me anything sign

Have a question? Look for “Ask Me” stations on campus where volunteer faculty, staff and students will help you (Christina Olivas photo).

Blue skies and “Ask Me” volunteers greeted the thousands of Spartans who returned to San Jose State today for the start of spring term 2014. A special welcome goes out to more than 540 new transfer students and 640 new graduate students, joining approximately 30,000 existing students. More new Spartans are on the way. SJSU received 28,900 first-time frosh and 15,000 transfer applications for fall 2014. Don’t panic about the traffic! The admissions process typically yields around 7,000 new students each fall, replacing those who will graduate. Still, now is a great time to check out Transportation Solutions. Get your EcoPass and sign up for Bay Area Bike Share. On campus, you’ll see tons of construction underway. The good news is the Student Union west wing is nearly done. You’ll find the Spartan Bookstore there in temporary digs soon and, before long, all kinds of new eats at Union Square.

(Christina Olivas photo)

Students search for textbooks in the bookstore (Christina Olivas photo).

Speaking of books, it’s time to get to work. A huge shout out goes to the more than 12,000 students who have devoted 197,000 service learning hours over the past eight years to CommUniverCity San Jose. Recently honored as San Jose’s greatest civic gift, CommUniverCity helps students gain real-life experience addressing neighborhood issues near campus. In Long Beach, California State University Chancellor Tim White is preparing to deliver the first State of the CSU Address, which will be live streamed 11 a.m. Jan. 29. The chancellor will share his vision for the 23-campus system, including top policy priorities for 2014-15 to advance student achievement and degree completion. What about tuition? The governor’s proposed budget calls for no tuition increases while stabilizing state funding for the CSU. That means extra change in your pocket. You’ll find lots going on at the Event Center. Coming soon are Spartan men’s basketball Jan. 29 (free admission for students with ID) and Winter White featuring Steve Aoki Jan. 30. Of course spring term’s biggest events come at the very end: Honors Convocation April 25 and Commencement May 24. Good luck, Spartans!

Promoting College Readiness

Promoting College Readiness

The African American Student Summit is part of SJSU’s efforts to to develop partnerships designed to promote student access and success (Stan Olszewski photo).

By Fernanda Karp, Campus and Community Relations Director

San Jose State played host to over 400 middle and high school students from Santa Clara County on Nov. 14 for the African American Student Summit, entitled “#collegeready.”

“It is exciting to welcome this many students to SJSU and be able to share my experiences,” said Danielle Miller, president of the SJSU Black Student Union and a planning committee member.

Unique partnership

Designed to show Bay Area students that a better future begins with college, the program is a unique partnership that includes the Division of Student Affairs, the Santa Clara County Alliance of Black Educators, the NAACP San Jose/Silicon Valley Branch, 100 Black Men of Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley Education Foundation and the California Alliance of African American Educators.

Throughout their visit on campus, the students will be immersed in a hands-on college journey experience, from application to admission and later to their involvement in campus activities and organizations.

Campus life

The students will tour the campus and take part in college-like classes and career exploration. They will also hear about college life directly from SJSU students.

“As a high school student, I never had anything like this offered to me and no particular mentors,” Miller said. “I am excited to be able to give back to my community and to help future college students. These types of events are very much needed and long overdue.”

With the aim of creating a college-going culture within the African American community, the day’s program is co-chaired by Associate Vice President for Student Affairs Art King and President of the Santa Clara County Alliance of Black Educators Leon Beauchman.

Five Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

Five Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

Five Reasons to be a Proud Spartan

SJSU admitted over 1,000 transfer applicants for spring 2014. Admissions Communications Counselor Kali Guidry helps collate all those acceptance letters (Enrollment Services image).

1. Alumna Ranae Moneymaker is a stunt double for Jennifer Lawrence in “The Hunger Games,” the sequel “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” and “X-Men: Days of Future Past.” A nutritional science major from 2005 to 2010, Moneymaker mastered flips, falls and overcoming fear as a member of the San Jose State gymnastics team.

2. San Jose State is congratulating over 1,000 transfer applicants recently admitted for spring 2014. In addition, thousands of students from across the country and around the world are applying now for fall 2014. Our Enrollment Services Facebook page makes it easy to stay on track.

3. SJSU features a top accounting program. The Lucas College and Graduate School of Business ranks seventh among 30 California’s public and private schools in terms of alumni pass rates on the certified public accountant exam. This is according to a Sacramento Business Journal analysis of National Association of State Boards of Accountancy data.

4. ESPN featured Spartan Racing, San Jose State Judo, Animation/Illustration and Grupo Folklorico Luna y Sol during the national broadcast of Spartan football’s Sept. 27 game. Check out this behind-the-scenes reel and join us as we look forward to the Homecoming Game Oct. 26.

5. Kirandeep Deol, ’14 biochemistry, was one of 255 students selected from a pool of nearly 4,000 applicants nationwide for the AMGEN Scholars Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has conducted research at MIT and attended a symposium at UCLA to meet other AMGEN scholars and hear from leading biotech scientists.

Student Assistant Amanda Holst contributed to this report.

Welcoming Incoming Spartans

Thousands of prospective students and parents hit campus April 13 for Admitted Spartan Day. Everyone at SJSU involved with recruiting new students came out in full force to welcome incoming freshmen, transfers and their families. Among the many offerings: academic presentations at every college; campus, housing and King Library tours; and workshops on everything from financial aid to Spartan spirit. Student Outreach and Recruitment organizes Admitted Spartan Day, and produced this super cute introductory video emailed to everyone who RSVPed to the event. Have you been accepted for fall 2013? Be sure to complete the intent to enroll process by May 1! Here’s more info for frosh, and more info for transfers. You can also learn more about admissions at info.sjsu.edu.

CNN: Pairing Up to Take the Pain Out of College Search

Posted by CNN Feb. 21, 2013.

(View video.)

San Jose, California (CNN) — At 17 years old, Jessica Perez is an honor student who aspires to be the first member of her family to graduate from college.

But when it came to the application process, she felt lost, alone and ill-prepared.

“I didn’t really know where to start,” said Perez, who wants to be an astrophysicist. “There wasn’t really anybody at home that could help me figure out how I could reach my dream.”

Perez’s grandparents, who raise Perez and her two siblings, both work long hours to make ends meet. And neither continued their education beyond elementary school.

Fortunately for Perez, she was directed by her school guidance counselor to a nonprofit called Strive for College.

“It helps students who don’t really know anything about the college process,” she said. “College students come to you and they tell you how to do it because they’ve been through it also.”

Strive for College pairs high-school students with college students for free, one-on-one consultation over a yearlong period. Each pair works together through the application process for colleges, scholarships and financial aid.

“We take them through every little step of the process, because, frankly, it’s a pretty detailed process — and if you miss one step, you could ruin all your chances,” said Michael Carter, who founded the nonprofit in 2007 while he was a college freshman.

So far, Strive for College has already helped 600 low-income students across the country enter four-year colleges and universities. And it expects to help an additional 900 this year.

Carter grew up in an upper-middle-class suburb of San Jose, California. He attended private school throughout his early childhood, and he remembers his grandfather calling him a “menso” — basically translated to “moron” in Spanish — for claiming everyone in the United States got an equal shot at success.

That pessimism started to make more sense to Carter when he transferred to a public high school in his junior year.

“Going to private schools, a lot of students who didn’t do amazingly academically knew they were going to a four-year college because their parents had gone. It was just a given,” said Carter, 24. “Whereas a lot of students at my public school, even if they had great GPAs and SATs, they didn’t know if they could go to a four-year college. It was just very foreign to a lot of them.”

It didn’t help that there were two guidance counselors for roughly 1,600 students. They just couldn’t devote themselves to students who failed to approach them about college — the very students who Carter felt needed this help the most.

“This made me realize that my grandpa was right, I was a menso,” Carter said. “And it made me firmly believe that this was a problem that was solvable.”

Carter designed a pilot study during his freshman year at Washington University in St. Louis. Pairing his classmates with low-income high school students at a nearby high school, he hoped to prove that college acceptance rates could be dramatically changed.

The pilot’s success was astounding: 24 of the 27 seniors in the study were accepted into four-year colleges. In the previous year, the school’s acceptance rate was only 1 out of every 30 seniors.

“At first it was like, ‘Wow, look at this amazing miracle that happened,’ ” Carter said. “But I quickly couldn’t sleep at night thinking how many of the (students) the year before had earned the right to go (to college) and just no one helped them across the finish line.”

Carter found that his study was indicative of a more widespread problem in the United States.

“There’s over 400,000 low-income high school seniors every year who (are) qualified to go to a four-year college, and for whatever reason they just don’t go,” Carter said.

And the difference between going to college and not going to college can often mean limited career opportunities or growth. Over a 40-year career, college graduates on average make nearly $1 million more than someone with only a high school degree, according to the U.S. Census (PDF).

“When my first (mentee) called me and said, ‘I got into my first college. You helped changed my life,’ I started crying,” Carter said. “I was like, ‘I think I really did help change your life.’ And it was just an amazing feeling.”

With the help of high-school administrators, Strive for College targets youth who attend schools where 50% or more of the students are eligible to receive free or reduced lunch.

To participate, students must have a GPA of at least 2.0. Interested students fill out a questionnaire about their academic and financial histories as well as their interests, abilities and ambitions. Then they can attend a “speed-dating-style” session in which they choose their college student mentor.

Throughout the school year, pairs meet at the high school once a week for an hour. The process takes the students through each step: selecting their target schools, filling out applications, writing essays, obtaining letters of recommendation, targeting scholarships and financial aid, reporting test scores and completing entrance exams.

“As a mentor, your role can be coach, pseudo-parent, cheerleader,” Carter said. “But it’s that amazing near-peer connection of young people with young people … helping them through a process you just went through yourself, and taking the mystery and anxiety out of it, that I think is really important.”

Strive for College also aims to help students graduate with the least amount of student loan debt possible, ensuring stronger graduation rates and enhancing the college experience. With scholarships and financial aid, 40% of Strive students attend four-year colleges without having to come out of pocket for their tuition — compared with 32% of low-income college students nationwide.

Beginning this spring, mentors and mentees will be able to communicate and track progress over the interactive “UStrive” community website. The social network will allow students to track the curriculum’s calendar and see when their peers complete major steps in the application process. Participants can make suggestions and bookmark items of interest for others.

Carter has found that the social component helps students stay on track with their goals.

“It creates peer pressure, but of a rare, positive kind. As they see one another looking at great universities and trying to aim for great financial aid packages, then their peers, their friends also say, ‘If you can do that, I can, too.’ And they start to raise their goals,” he said. “It’s a really powerful process in which you’re building a culture of achievement in the schools.”

It’s a culture that helped Shanna Brancato raise her own academic ambitions. The former foster child had never considered college as part of her future when she was encouraged to attend her first Strive for College session in her junior year of high school.

“I’ve never really thought of myself as the greatest student. College was not on my mind,” she said. “Now I’m a sophomore at San Jose State University. My full tuition is covered, and I’m mentoring a high school student.”

Many former mentees, like Brancato, become Strive for College mentors.

“It’s that ‘paying it forward’ mentality that is building a Strive movement that will solve this problem, I think, within the next decade,” Carter said.

Carter graduated from college in 2010 and has devoted himself full-time to his nonprofit. Strive for College now has 12 university chapters working in 15 high schools nationwide, and it is planning to launch eight more chapters this year.

“The more we grow, the more students we help, the greater our impact, the bigger our movement,” Carter said. “We’ll go from changing hundreds to thousands of lives, to changing hundreds of thousands, and some day soon, even millions.

“I’m so sure this will happen, because I believe in our generation. I know our mentors. I know the students we serve. And I know that together we are going to solve this problem.”

Want to get involved? Check out the Strive for College website at www.striveforcollege.org and see how to help.

 

Turning Dreams Into Reality

Turning College Dreams Into Reality

Turning Dreams Into Reality

All new frosh will be invited to orientation, including an overnight stay in campus housing. Working with small groups, like this one from 2012, helps break the ice and make friends (Christina Olivas photo).

Contact: Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations, 408-656-6999

Good news is on the way via email to more than 27,490 prospective Spartans!

SJSU has begun sending provisional admissions notices to 17,340 new freshmen and 10,150 upper-division transfers.

How to they feel about it? Well, the tweets have been especially sweet.

@SJSU I knew it felt right from the moment I stepped on campus! And now it’s becoming a reality. I’m so ecstatic that I got #accepted!” wrote @bernicedignacio.

And from @xoxoKarinaH_BTR: “Woo hoo happy to say that this fall I shall attend @SJSU :D.” We’re happy too!

Admissions packages will be sent via U.S. mail to frosh and transfers beginning Feb. 26. Graduate and international admissions are still underway. You can follow the action on the SJSU Enrollment Services Facebook page.

Coming up next is Admitted Spartan Day on April 13, when we’ll open campus to to all prospective students and their families.

Then there’s the national intent-to-enroll deadline on May 1. That’s when students let colleges and universities know their final decision on where they’re headed for fall 2013.

All new frosh and transfers will be invited to orientation, including an overnight stay in campus housing for all frosh during weekly sessions this summer.

We’re still fine tuning our forecast for fall 2013, but during fall 2012, SJSU ended up enrolling more than 3,400 frosh and 3,100 transfers.

Unfortunately, SJSU did make the very difficult decision to turn away 6,500 applicants who failed to meet impaction thresholds in their chosen majors.

San Jose State continues to receive far more applications for admission than can be accommodated due to state budget cuts.

Admissions impaction criteria remains in place, which means applicants are admitted into their majors on a space available basis.

The good news for those who were admitted is Proposition 30 seeks to minimize tuition increases. View current SJSU tuition and fees.

Frosh and Transfer Applications Surge

Fall 2013 Frosh and Transfer Applications Surge

How crowded will campus be next fall? Expect the same as this fall, given strong applicant interest in SJSU (Christina Olivas photo).

Demand for an SJSU degree remains super strong, with more than 43,000 students applying for admission in fall 2013 as freshmen, transfers or credential candidates by the Nov. 30 deadline.

This number will grow given SJSU is still accepting applications from international, graduate and doctorate of nursing practice candidates. Apply now.

So far, more than 27,000 students have applied for admission as freshmen, a nearly 10 percent increase over last year. More than 15,300 students have applied as transfers, jumping nearly 22 percent over last year.

This was likely driven by pent up demand from community college students given SJSU was forced to close for spring 2013 admissions due to the state budget crunch, a situation the passage of Proposition 30 could alleviate.

How many fall 2013 freshmen and transfer applicants will end up enrolling? In fall 2012, SJSU enrolled nearly 7,000 freshmen and transfers.

Also notable was the surge in credential applicants. More than 1,300 people applied for admission to SJSU’s Connie L. Lurie College of Education credential programs, up more than 12 percent from last year.

Many factors may be contributing to the overall surge in applications, including demographics, the value of a college degree, relatively low tuition and fees, the online application process through CSU Mentor and, for SJSU, a superb location in Silicon Valley and near all Northern California has to offer.

Read a related CSU news release.

SJSU Invites Youths on "Journey to Success"

SJSU Invites Youths on “Journey to Success”

 

SJSU Invites Youths on "Journey to Success"

The California State University “Journey to Success” program seeks to help Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders attend college and graduate (Christina Olivas photo).

Media contact:
Fernanda Perdomo Karp
, Student Affairs
Campus and Community Relations, (408) 924-1162

SAN JOSE, CA
– City of Campbell Vice Mayor Evan Low, ’03 Political Science, will be the keynote speaker at San Jose State’s first “Journey to Success” event, geared toward providing Asian American and Pacific Islander students in grades 6 through 12 with the information they need to go to college.

This event, for young people and their families, will begin at 8 a.m. Nov. 3 in the Student Union’s Barrett Ballroom. Register here.

The California State University “Journey to Success” program seeks to help Asian American and Pacific Islanders attend college and graduate. The SJSU event will feature educational workshops covering every step from application to obtaining a diploma. Speakers will include CSU faculty members, community leaders, and AAPI student ambassadors, who will share their own journeys to success.

“’Journey to Success’ is integral to San Jose State University’s efforts to open the doors of higher education to all eligible students,” President Mohammad Qayoumi said. “We invite all interested students and their families to register for this event, visit our campus, and begin planning now to attend and graduate from college.”

“Journey to Success” began in October 2010 as a collaborative effort between the CSU and leaders from the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. The initiative will expand to SJSU for the first time this year. San Jose State’s event will open with a performance by the Akbayan Filipino American Organization and feature a lunchtime show by the Pride of the Pacific Islands. Lunch will be provided to all attendees.

San Jose State — Silicon Valley’s largest institution of higher learning with 30,500 students and 3,850 employees — is part of the California State University system. SJSU’s 154-acre downtown campus anchors the nation’s 10th largest city.

Speakers Inspire Future Spartans

Children attend the college day event

More than a hundred elementary, middle, and high school students from throughout Santa Clara County gathered at SJSU Sept. 27 for the College Day 2012 kickoff (Jessica Olthof photo).

More than a hundred elementary, middle, and high school students from throughout Santa Clara County gathered at SJSU Sept. 27 to hear from a variety of speakers about their college experiences, kicking off College Day 2012.

“By sharing the diverse education paths of some of our top leaders in the community with many first generation students, we hope to inspire them to design a path to college for themselves,” said Kim Guptill, College Day Chair.

Learn more about applying to SJSU.

Where Every Day is College Day

The crowd itself was an inspiration. Among the young people in attendance were over 30 Overfelt High School students, including 20 juniors, enrolled in their second year of calculus, a huge achievement for college-bound students, especially those from what is perceived to be a tough neighborhood.

“We like to say every day is College Day,” said Overfelt Principal Vito Chiala, noting that offering Calculus II on a high school campus where most students qualify for free and subsidized lunches shows that young people everywhere can achieve.

Overfelt Calculus II student Crystal Soto urged the crowd to accept help from teachers, as she did many years ago when a middle school instructor realized the “class clown” also had potential to become a “hardworking student.”

“She made me feel like a person rather than a student,” Crystal recalled. “She got me to want to go to college, and helped me come up with a plan.”

“The Future is in Your Hands”

Mark L. Walker, managing director, Global Community Affairs, Applied Materials Foundation, the event’s premier sponsor, shared with the young people in the crowd that like many of them, he was a first-generation college student.

“College really made me into who I am today,” he said. He urged students to get involved, recalling how “he learned all sorts of leadership skills” as a college newspaper business manager and fraternity president.

He reminded the crowd that Silicon Valley remains one of the best places in the world for a college graduate, with one percent unemployment in leading fields such as electrical engineering.

Walker recalled he started out in life dreaming of playing for the NFL, and then later deciding he would emulate TV lawyers before taking his first business class in college.

“The future is in your hands today,” he said. “Knowing what you want to do is probably less important than knowing that you want to go to college.”

“Achieving Something More”

Sam Liccardo, the San Jose council member representing downtown including SJSU, recalled that as a second-generation college student, “it was never a question in my mind that I would attend college.”

He went on to graduate from Georgetown University. But one of the greatest lessons he learned came from his grandfather, who dropped out of middle school.

When Sam came home with the news that he was admitted to Harvard Law School, his grandfather asked, “Sam, you’re not going to become one of those elites, are you?”

Sam explained to the young people in the crowd, many of whom would be first in their families to attend college, “you need to understand, you are achieving something more, not becoming something different.”

Liccardo went on to devote his life to public service, working as a prosecutor of sexual assault and child exploitation crimes in the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office before running for public office.

“The Same Level of Success”

“Achieving something more, not becoming something different,” was also on the mind of Limbergh Arceo, the second Calculus II Overfelt student to address the crowd.

Although his childhood was challenging, his mother “always encouraged me” to do well in school. So he hit the books and even considered attending a college prep private high school.

But after taking summer classes at the private school, he decided to stick with Overfelt, which he argues offers even more rigorous academics.

He added he was dressed casually although he was a College Day kick-off speaker to bring home the point that it is not what you look like or where you are from that counts.

“We are just as smart as the other students, and can achieve the same level of success,” he said.

 

 

 

SJSU campus sign

SJSU Open for Fall 2013 Admissions

SJSU campus sign

On Oct. 1, all 23 CSU campuses including SJSU will begin accepting applications from new students for admission to the fall 2013 term.

San Jose State will continue accepting applications through November 30 from new undergraduates who would like to attend SJSU beginning in fall 2013 term.

New students should visit www.csumentor.edu to complete an application. Future Spartans can also download SJSU’s beautiful Fall 2013 Guide to Admission brochure.

The next step after applying is completing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Nearly half of Cal State undergraduates receive enough in financial aid to cover the full cost of their tuition.

CSU tuition remains among the lowest in the nation. View current SJSU tuition and campus fees.

 

College Day Kick Off September 27

San Jose State Hosts Second Annual College Day Kick Off

Nothing inspires like appearances by Sammy and SJSU’s cheer team, both of whom attended this 2011 College Day event (photo courtesy of SJSU Division of Student Affairs)

School Districts, Businesses and Non-profits Join Countywide Effort to Promote College for All Students

Media Contact:
Kim Guptill, (408) 464-3642

SAN JOSE, Calif. – One hundred elementary, middle, and high school students from throughout Santa Clara County will gather at San Jose State University to kick off College Day, starting at 9 a.m. on September 27, on the lawn between Clark Hall and Tower Hall, near the Sculpture Garden featuring the sculpture of SJSU Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos. The youngsters will hear from a variety of speakers about their college experiences.

“By sharing the diverse education paths of some of our top leaders in the community with many first generation students, we hope to inspire them to design a path to college for themselves, whether they are fifth graders or are seniors in high school,” said Kim Guptill, College Day Chair.

College Day is a county-wide college-going effort on September 28, spearheaded by the volunteer-led First-Generation College Attainment Coalition. The goal of College Day is to create a college-going culture in Santa Clara County and help our children and youth plan and design their path to college. This happens when educators, youth workers, parents and other adults engage children in conversations, lessons, and other college-promoting activities. The September 27 kick-off will introduce College Day to the entire county. Learn more about applying to SJSU.

Sharing Their Stories

SJSU President Mohammad Qayoumi will welcome the students, and share his path to college, followed by Mark L. Walker, managing director, Global Community Affairs, Applied Materials Foundation, the event’s premier sponsor. Other speakers include Dr. Xavier De La Torre, Santa Clara County Office of Education superintendent; Elaine Chin, dean, Connie L. Lurie College of Education at SJSU; Dave Cortese, Santa Clara County supervisor; Sam Liccardo, San Jose city councilmember; Overfelt High Schools students, and San Jose State University first-generation college students. NBC Bay Area News Reporter Damian Trujillo will serve as master of ceremonies. SJSU’s beloved mascot, Sammy Spartan, will make an appearance.

Across the day and throughout the valley, classrooms, hallways and doors will be decorated with college banners, educational posters and inspirational messages, encouraging students to aspire to go to college. Teachers will begin their day leading students in designing their college paths, and continue by creating College Corners in their classroom. Every student in Santa Clara County will be given a College Day sticker, and every classroom an “Every Day is College Day” poster.

College Day is sponsored by the Applied Materials Foundation, San Jose State University, Kids in Common, Downtown College Prep, Robert Grimm, Lynda Greene and Councilmember Sam Liccardo. Organizations and people who have collaborated to make College Day a reality include: Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID), ALearn, Breakthrough Silicon Valley, College on Track, CommUniverCity, FIRST 5, Franklin McKinley Children’s Initiative, GoVoluntr, Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE), Office of the Mayor (City of San Jose), Sacred Heart Community Services, San Jose Public Library, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Silicon Valley Leadership Group, Summer Search, University of California Berkeley, Center for Educational Partnerships (Destination College Advising Corps) and University of California, Santa Cruz, Educational Partnership Center (San Jose Cal-SOAP).

Photo Opportunities

Photo opportunities for members of the media will include students asking questions of President Qayoumi and Overfelt High Schools students speaking.

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

In the past, this time of year was when SJSU accepted applications for spring admissions, mostly from community college transfer students, but also from graduate students entering programs accepting newcomers in the middle of the academic year. Beginning in 2009, when SJSU was hit by severe budget cuts, spring admissions varied depending on the budget situation and the number of enrolled students. This fall, SJSU has already filled every spot available to California residents for the entire academic year, meaning California residents are filling all seats supported by a combination of state and tuition dollars. So SJSU opened spring admissions to only non-resident graduate students from elsewhere in the United States or abroad who cover the full cost of their education in higher tuition without state support. This touched off a series of stories in the major media, including the San Jose Mercury News and KQED news radio. Is this fair? Who is to blame? On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend. Listen to the show.

Why SJSU is Cutting 500 Sections

SJSU Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

Why SJSU is Accepting Non-Resident Graduate Students in Spring 2013

On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend.

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

In the past, this time of year was when SJSU accepted applications for spring admissions, mostly from community college transfer students, but also from graduate students entering programs accepting newcomers in the middle of the academic year. Beginning in 2009, when SJSU was hit by severe budget cuts, spring admissions varied depending on the budget situation and the number of enrolled students. This fall, SJSU has already filled every spot available to California residents for the entire academic year, meaning California residents are filling all seats supported by a combination of state and tuition dollars. So SJSU opened spring admissions to only non-resident graduate students from elsewhere in the United States or abroad who cover the full cost of their education in higher tuition without state support. This touched off a series of stories in the major media, including the San Jose Mercury News and KQED news radio. Is this fair? Who is to blame? On Aug. 16, as a guest on KQED’s news talk show “Forum,” President Qayoumi explained that millions of dollars in state budget cuts for public higher education means SJSU lacks the funding to admit all California residents who would like to attend. Listen to the show.

CSU logo

Ten CSU Campuses to Accept Limited Applications for Admission in Spring 2013

CSU logo

Due to severe budget cuts, SJSU is unable to accept applications for admission from California residents for state funded programs for spring 2013. Alternatives include San Francisco State, CSU East Bay and Sonoma State.

Budget cuts force the reduction of enrollment to match available funding

By Pat Lopes Harris, Media Relations Director

(July 30, 2012) – Severe budget cuts over the past several years and the prospect of an additional $250 million trigger cut will limit new student applications to only 10 California State University campuses for the spring 2013 application period. Applications to those campuses will be limited primarily to students who have earned an Associate Degree for Transfer from a California Community College. For the spring 2013 application period, only Channel Islands, Chico, Fullerton, East Bay, Humboldt, Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Francisco and Sonoma will be accepting applications from prospective new students. Due to California budget restrictions, SJSU will meet our enrollment capacity prior to the Spring 2013 application term. Consequently, SJSU will not be accepting any applications for admission from California residents for state funded programs for spring 2013. Graduate and undergraduate international applicants with an F1 or J1 visa type can submit an application for spring 2013 using the international application. U.S. residents who are not California residents can submit an application from August 1 through September 30, 2012. CSU Mentor, Cal State’s admissions website, is always an applicant’s first and best source of information. Read a related news release. View the CSU Budget Central website, the SJSU Budget Central website, or current SJSU tuition and campus fees.

CSU logo

CSU Faces Unprecedented Demand, Limited Space

CSU logo

San Jose State received received 45,000 applications for fall 2012, a four percent increase over last year.

Applications and admits continue to rise despite efforts to control enrollment

(May 21, 2012) – The California State University today released preliminary systemwide data for the upcoming fall term indicating all-time highs in applications, and a year-over-year increase in the number of students admitted. San Jose State received 45,000 applications for fall 2012, a four percent increase over last year. SJSU admitted over 26,000 applicants, including over 24,000 undergraduates. The CSU expects to enroll approximately 25 percent of the resident first-time freshmen admitted and roughly 50 percent of the resident transfer students admitted. The CSU estimates that 95 percent of the enrolling freshman class and 94 percent of enrolling undergraduate transfer students will be California residents. “The CSU is caught between a huge demand to attend our universities and a state that simply is not providing adequate funding for these students,” said Eric Forbes, CSU assistant vice chancellor, student academic support.  “We are facing a tipping point in terms of the promise of access that is at the heart of the CSU mission.” Read more.