SJSU’s Julia Curry Rodriguez Named Wang Family Excellence Award Recipient

Dr. Julia E. Curry Rodriguez has received the 2019 Wang Family Excellence Award for Outstanding Faculty Service.

Dr. Julia E. Curry Rodriguez has received the 2019 Wang Family Excellence Award for Outstanding Faculty Service.

Media contacts:

Robin McElhatton, SJSU Media Relations Specialist, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif.—The California State University Chancellor’s Office announced today that San Jose State University’s Julia E. Curry Rodríguez, an associate professor of Mexican American Studies, is the recipient of the 2019 Wang Family Excellence Award for Outstanding Faculty Service.

Curry was selected for the prestigious award for her unwavering support of students, specifically immigrant and undocumented students in her two decades of service to SJSU. Since 2009, she has worked with the Chicano/Latino Faculty and Staff Association to provide scholarships for undocumented students, including the establishment of full-semester scholarships. She advocated institutionalizing services, support and resources for immigrant students, leading to the development of SJSU’s UndocuSpartan Resource Center in 2018.

“I have worked with thousands of students—many of whom are first-generation, immigrants or of immigrant origin,” says Curry. “Their tenacity, perseverance, humility, dignity and grace inspire me daily. Their example of lived commitment and struggle guide how I live out my profession.”

Curry has mentored five doctoral students through the Chancellor’s Doctoral Incentive Program (CDIP), two of whom are now CSU faculty. She also serves as the faculty advisor to Student Advocates for Higher Education, an undocumented student support group founded in 2003, and the Chicano/a/x Graduate Council.

Julia Curry Rodriguez received SJSU's Distinguished Service Award in 2014.

Julia Curry Rodriguez received SJSU’s Distinguished Service Award in 2014.

She was instrumental in developing a new bachelor’s degree in Mexican American Studies, coordinates with the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies to address legal challenges, such as the Supreme Court Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)/Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) case, and organizes symposia covering policies related to in-state tuition and the California Dream Act.

Curry has also maintained an active research, scholarship and creative activities agenda. In 2003, she received a grant from the Ford Foundation to document services for binational students who immigrate to the U.S., then migrate back to their home regions in Mexico. Other recent research includes an article on “Decolonial Food for Thought: Mexican-Origin Food, Foodways, and Social Movements” in the Journal of Equity and Excellence in Education and a reader entitled Mothers, Mothering and Motherhood Across Cultural Differences.

The SJSU 2014 Distinguished Service Award recipient, Curry has been featured in SJSU’s My Story is Here campaign and in Washington Square magazine.

The Wang Family Excellence Award recognizes four outstanding faculty members and one outstanding staff member who, through extraordinary commitment and dedication, have distinguished themselves by exemplary contributions and achievements. Learn more about the CSU 2019 Wang Excellence Award recipients online.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

Spartan Football Receives $1 Million Gift from Kevin and Sandy Swanson

Kevin and Sandy Swanson at the Spartan football All In campaign event in 2017. Photo: David Schmitz

Media contacts:

Robin McElhatton, SJSU Media Relations Specialist, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu
Lawrence Fan, SJSU Athletics Media Relations Director, 408-924-1217, lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif.— San Jose State University is pleased to announce that it has received a $1 million gift commitment from alumnus Kevin Swanson, ’87 Finance, and his wife Sandy Swanson. Their gift will contribute to a new football operations center on the east side of the CEFCU Stadium, Home of the Spartans.

“This gift reflects the support and love Kevin and Sandy have for our football program and for San Jose State University,” said Director of Athletics Marie Tuite. “Win or lose, they are committed to improving the experiences and well-being of our student-athletes through their generous donation. They understand the value of the football operations center to San Jose State, and their generosity is an indication of their belief in Coach Brent Brennan and his staff. We offer a sincere and heartfelt ‘thank you’ to two of the best Spartans in our community.”

Supporting Common Goals

The Swansons’ San Jose financial services office is decorated in Spartan regalia, from a SJSU flag hanging on the wall to Kevin’s diploma. As an undergraduate, Kevin was active in the Delta Upsilon fraternity, a network of friends and colleagues who invited him back after graduating to serve as a fraternity advisor. For 11 years, he mentored Spartans and Sandy attended countless pledge dances and university events. The chance to connect with students on a personal and professional level inspired the Swansons to attend Spartan football games, enjoying tailgates with a community of friends.

“One thing I love about athletics is the opportunity it brings to students who wouldn’t otherwise have an opportunity to pursue an education,” said Kevin. “It offers the opportunity for young men and women to learn more about themselves and to work on a team with a common goal as a community.”

In 2018, the couple learned about Beyond Football, which offers unique programming for Spartan football players to develop career and life skills that extend beyond the sport. Together, they volunteered to offer mock interviews alongside a cohort of Silicon Valley professionals to critique the students’ interview techniques. The chance to interact one-on-one with football players in a professional capacity inspired them to find a lasting way to give back.

“It really struck us that the football team and the Beyond Football program were really making a difference in these young men’s lives,” said Sandy, a CSU Hayward graduate who calls San Jose State her adopted alma mater. “That type of foresight on the part of the athletics department is inspirational for us, and we’d love to see those types of things continue.”

“Kevin and Sandy Swanson have been amazing to us since we came on board two years ago,” said SJSU Head Football Coach Brent Brennan. “They believe, like many of us do, that in the process of building a top-flight football program, we need to invest at a high level. This gift is another huge step in the direction of giving our program the facilities it needs to compete at the highest level in the Mountain West. I am so thankful for their belief in what we are building here.”

Football Matters

The Swansons believe that by supporting the football program, they can multiply their impact for all student-athletes at San Jose State.

“The impact that athletics has on athletes in any sport is significant and one of the reasons we are making this donation,” said Kevin. “We believe that on most campuses football is a major factor in fundraising and revenue generation for the entire campus. When you have a strong football program, you have a strong athletics program. Athletics really does change students’ lives.”

“Kevin and Sandy are longtime passionate supporters of San José State University and of Spartan football, and this commitment speaks volumes about just how passionate they are,” said Paul Lanning, vice president for university advancement and CEO of SJSU’s Tower Foundation. “We’re grateful and proud to count them among the growing number of major benefactors who believe in this project and want to see it happen as quickly as possible.”

To track fundraising progress and learn how you can support the football operations center, please visit sjsufootball.com or contact Joshua Thiel, deputy athletics director for athletics advancement, at 408-924-1697 or via email at joshua.thiel@sjsu.edu.

About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce

The university is proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

About San Jose State Athletics

San Jose State University sponsors 22 (nine men’s and 13 women’s) NCAA Division I intercollegiate sports programs for approximately 470 student-athletes annually.

In football, the Spartans are a member of Division I’s Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the NCAA’s highest level of competition.

The Spartans’ primary conference affiliation is with the Mountain West. Selected teams belong to the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF), the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) and the Golden Coast Conference (GCC).

San Jose State has 10 NCAA team championships and 52 NCAA individual titles. Sixty-two (62) Spartans competed in one or more Olympic Games. San Jose State athletes have won seven gold, six silver and seven bronze medals at the Olympics.

Annually, about one-third of the student-athlete population earns either an institutional, conference or national recognition based on outstanding academic performance.

Insights Speaker Series Features Economists Robert Reich and Ben Stein

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

San Jose, CA – Economists Robert Reich and Ben Stein will participate in a powerful and entertaining conversation on the future of the U.S. economy during San Jose State University’s Insights Speaker Series, “The Way Forward: Perspectives on the U.S. Economy.” Moderated by SJSU President Mary A. Papazian and underwritten by the Valley Foundation, this event is the second in a new university-wide speaker series that exposes the San Jose State community to a variety of perspectives in the areas of economics, business and global affairs.

The Way Forward: Perspectives on the U.S. Economy

Event Details

Tuesday, February 5
7 p.m.
Hammer Theatre Center, 101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose, CA 95113

Tickets

Students: Reserve your free ticket with Tower ID at the Hammer Theatre Box Office
Faculty, staff, alumni and community: $20 tickets available online

Speakers

Robert Reich, the author of 15 books and now a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, has served under three national administrations, most recently as Secretary of Labor under Bill Clinton. In 2008, TIME magazine named him one of the 10 most successful cabinet secretaries of the past century.

Ben Stein has an eclectic background. He was a speechwriter for Presidents Nixon and Ford, an actor and game show host, a columnist for the Wall Street Journal and New York Times, and the author or co-author of more than 30 books. He is currently a regular commentator on CBS Sunday Morning, Fox News and CNN.

For more information, visit the Hammer Theatre website.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

Associated Students House Relocation: Street Closures on Jan. 12, 2019

The Associated Student (A.S.) House will be relocated to Tenth Street on January 12. Photo: Roman Goshev, ’07 Graphic Design

SJSU Media Relations:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

Associated Students (A.S.) House relocation is scheduled for Saturday, January 12, 2019. Street closures will occur between 12 a.m. and 8 p.m. The streets affected are:

  • 4th St., between San Fernando and San Carlos St.
  • San Fernando St., between 4th St. and Ninth St.

The purpose of the street closures is to relocate San Jose State University’s Associated Students House to its new location on the north side of the campus. All sidewalks are open to the public. Street closures and detours are shown on the road closure map (PDF).

Read the original announcement for additional information.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

CSU Shares Profile of SJSU’s Fritz Yambrach, Professor and Inventor

San Jose State University’s Professor Fritz Yambrach brings the same innovative and practical approach to his work, whether rebuilding the packaging program in the College of Health and Human Sciences’ Department of Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging, creating internships for students with industry partners or developing a new way for people to carry water in developing countries.

When he was hired in 2006, the packaging program had five students enrolled and four courses. He has since developed 10 courses that include packaging for medical devices, pharmaceuticals and food processing, and built the program to an enrollment of 70 students.

Fritz Yambrach, a professor in Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging helped to develop a way to package water to transport to disaster areas or areas where water is not readily available. (Photo: James Tensuan, '15 Journalism)

Fritz Yambrach, a professor in Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging helped to develop a way to package water to transport to disaster areas or areas where water is not readily available. (Photo: James Tensuan, ’15 Journalism)

“I created course content I believed was useful to a working professional in the field,” Yambrach says. “Packaging is simply problem solving. I’ll give [students] relationships between items and then see how they put it together and make creative extensions.”

Yambrach is the latest San Jose State University faculty member to be featured in the CSU Spotlight with a new profile and video about his teaching philosophy and his research. He is the inventor of a water vest that is being tested in Haiti, Burundi and Ethiopia as an ergonomic, hygienic alternative to carrying water in buckets over long distances.

Fritz, who received the 2017 DuPont Diamond Packaging Innovation Award, said those who have tested the vest since 2006 found an unexpected benefit: “Young girls in Ethiopia were typically tasked with collecting water and it often meant they couldn’t go to school,” he explained. “The vest is allowing more girls to attend school since it makes transporting water much easier.”

Read more about Yambrach’s teaching and research in the CSU Profile, an SJSU Academic Spotlight story and an SJSU Washington Square profile.

SJSU Ranked No. 22 on List of Best Schools for Transfers in the Nation

Incoming students pose for a photo with their orientation leader at San Jose State University on Thursday, June 28, 2018. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

Incoming students pose for a photo with their orientation leader at San Jose State University on Thursday, June 28, 2018. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

San Jose State University made Money Magazine’s list of the top 50 best schools for transfer students ranking at No. 22. The institutions on the top 50 list were selected from an original list of 727 best-value institutions. The field was narrowed based on transfer enrollment of more than 15 percent, rate of transfer students earning degrees compared to first-time peers, and four-and-six year graduation rates for transfer students.

In fall 2018, SJSU enrolled more than 3,800 new transfer students who made up 40 percent of incoming undergraduate students.

Transfer students also fare well at SJSU in terms of graduation rates. The percentage of students completing their degrees in two years increased from 19 percent in 2013/14 to 31.7 percent in 2017/18. The number of Spartan transfers completing a degree in four years is at 74.3 percent, up from 67 percent in 2013/14.

California State University and University of California campuses dominated the list, largely due to a statewide set of general education courses that allow students to more easily transfer course credit between institutions.

For more information on transferring to SJSU, visit the Transfer Admissions website.

SJSU Physics Professor’s Groundbreaking Research Featured in ‘Science’

Ehsan Khatami is one of two San Jose State University faculty members selected as an Early Career Investigator Award winners in 2017-18. (Photo: James Tensuan, '15 Journalism)

Ehsan Khatami is one of two San Jose State University faculty members selected as Early Career Investigator Award winners in 2017-18. (Photo: James Tensuan, ’15 Journalism)

San Jose State University Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy Ehsan Khatami in collaboration with a group of professors from MIT and the MIT-Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms published today in the journal Science their latest experimental discovery about conduction in a tiny system of atoms in a vacuum.

Khatami, who was granted early tenure and promotion to associate professor this year, received a funding from the National Science Foundation with colleague Sen Chiao, of the Meteorology Department to build the first high-performance computing cluster on campus. The equipment has proven essential to his research as well as the work of students and faculty in other disciplines that require big data analysis.

In his most recent article, Khatami and his colleagues discuss an experiment that is impossible to perform using real materials. They were able to focus on the movement of atoms’ intrinsic magnetic field, or “spin,” across a few microns without disturbing their charge arrangement (charge is another intrinsic property of atoms) as the first of its kind with a quantum system. The results shed light on the mostly unexplored spin transport property of models condensed matter scientists use to describe the unusual behavior of solids at very low temperatures.

Atoms are like small magnets, so applying a magnetic force pushes them around, here to the left (top left). Since these atoms repel each other, they cannot move if there are no empty sites (top middle). But the atomic “magnetic needles” are still free to move, with stronger magnets (red) diffusing to the left in the image, and weaker magnets (blue) having to make room and move to the right (bottom row). This so-called spin transport is resolved atom by atom in the cold atom quantum emulator.

Atoms are like small magnets, so applying a magnetic force pushes them around, here to the left (top left). Since these atoms repel each other, they cannot move if there are no empty sites (top middle). But the atomic “magnetic needles” are still free to move, with stronger magnets (red) diffusing to the left in the image, and weaker magnets (blue) having to make room and move to the right (bottom row). This so-called spin transport is resolved atom by atom in the cold atom quantum emulator.

Khatami’s research aims to help scientists understand how superconductivity works—a finding that could potentially pave the way for a room-temperature superconductor, which would improve transportation and data storage and make homes more energy efficient by creating materials that allow better use of electricity. That is, as electricity goes through a device such as a phone or laptop, none of the electronic components would heat up. Superconductivity is the property of zero electrical resistance in some substances at very low temperatures (<-135 degrees Celsius).

The experiment was carried out using 400 atoms cooled down to just a hair above absolute zero temperature (<-273 degrees Celsius). The atoms were manipulated to be two different types and to act as if they were electrons in a solid with two species of spin. The atoms were then trapped in a square box to see how they would respond when magnetic fields keeping one species on the left side and one species on the right side of the box were turned off. Scientists watched the process by using an electron gas microscope to measure the speed at which mixing takes place and deduce the “spin” current.

Khatami compares the box of atoms to a shallow pool of water – if there was a divider in the middle with clear water on one side and water dyed black on the other side when the divider is suddenly removed the water would mix together and turn gray. The two shades of water would be similar to the two spin species in the quantum experiment, with the behavior of the atoms governed by quantum mechanics.

To support the experiment, Khatami used more than 300,000 CPU hours on SJSU’s Spartan High-Performance Computer to solve the underlying theoretical model that was emulated in the experiment to support experimental observations.

“As exciting as these findings have been, there are still so many unanswered questions we can explore using similar setups,” he said. “For example, the dependence of spin transport on the temperature or the concentration of atoms in the box can be studied.”

Khatami received the SJSU 2017-18 Early Career Investigator Award and has offered insights into his research on the web series Physics Girl. He was featured in the Fall/Winter 2018 edition of Washington Square alumni magazine.

SJSU, Spartan Football Receive $2 Million Gift from Alumnus John Hopkirk and Anne Murphy

Media contacts:
Robin McElhatton, SJSU Media Relations Specialist, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu
Lawrence Fan, SJSU Athletics Media Relations Director, 408-924-1217, lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University is pleased to announce that it has received a $2 million gift commitment from alumnus John Hopkirk and his wife Anne Murphy. Their gift will support a critical resource for the Spartan football program; a new state-of-the-art football operations center on the east side of CEFCU Stadium, Home of the Spartans.

“John and Anne have been long-time Spartan supporters and their gift to the football operations center demonstrates their love for San Jose State University,” said Athletics Director Marie Tuite. “They understand and support the priority of investing in football to provide Coach Brennan and his staff the tools they need to build a championship program.  In addition, John and Anne understand the value and impact their gift will have on changing the lives of the student-athletes we serve. We are so grateful for their generosity.”

The football operations center will include locker rooms, offices, a student-athlete lounge, an auditorium and premium seating options on the 50-yard line. The project will rebuild the stadium’s east side. The gift will add to improvements underway throughout South Campus, including the recently completed soccer, tennis, golf, and softball facilities.

Proud Spartans: John Hopkirk and Anne Murphy

John Hopkirk worked his way through school at San Jose State while pursuing a degree in business accounting. Hopkirk’s love for SJSU athletics took off after he graduated and began his professional career as a certified public accountant. As an avid supporter of SJSU football and basketball, Hopkirk believes he may be the only fan who has seen every SJSU men’s post-season basketball game since he first enrolled at San Jose State in the late 1960s.  

In 1987, John met his wife, Anne Murphy, a University of San Francisco graduate. Anne has embraced John’s passion for SJSU athletics and the couple travels all over the country to watch the Spartans compete.

“I have been following Spartan football for over 50 years.  It has brought me much joy, and we have made many great friends through our common love of Spartan football,” said Hopkirk. “I received a great education from San Jose State, and Anne and I thought we needed to give back to the university to show our appreciation. I hope our gift inspires others to do the same.

“San Jose State must have the facilities in place to attract the best and brightest student-athletes,” Hopkirk continued. “Hopefully our donation will enhance Spartan football’s chance to be a championship program and result in many more talented student-athletes proudly earning their diplomas from San Jose State University.”

“This critical project will have a major impact on Spartan football and our entire athletics program, as well as the gameday experience for our students and all who attend our games,” stated Paul Lanning, vice president for university advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation. “Building a modern football operations center that revitalizes CEFCU Stadium is our most urgent fundraising priorities, and we’re thrilled to see two of our greatest fans make such a generous commitment to this project.”

“I am so grateful for John and Anne’s tremendous commitment and generosity to support and build a championship football program at San Jose State,” added Head Football Coach Brent Brennan. “Their gift provides us with a critical recruiting tool, enhances the student-athlete experience and helps SJSU compete in the Mountain West. I can’t thank John and Anne enough for their commitment to the program.”

To learn how you can support the football operations center, please visit www.sjsufootball.com or contact Joshua Thiel, Deputy Athletics Director for Athletics Advancement, at (408) 924-1697 or via email at joshua.thiel@sjsu.edu.

About San Jose State University


The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

Updates on Air Quality/Health Concerns

The latest air quality and campus closure information.

Frequently Asked Questions

Editor’s Note: The FAQ was updated Nov. 19, 2018 to reflect answers to additional inquiries.

What level of ventilation and filtration is used in university buildings?

We use Merv 11 HVAC Filters. This is one of the best filtering systems on the market. They are changed typically every six months. However, we have been looking at the air flow through the filters monthly. If we see restrictions, we are replacing them ahead of schedule. All buildings on campus have been reduced to minimal make up air from the outside.  All make up air passes through the Merv 11 filters. (MERV 9 to 12 furnace air filters capture up to 95% of airborne particles and contaminants like pollen, dust mites and mold spores, as small as 1.0 microns.)

What type of air mask should I be using?

Typically the N95 is best for most people, including the 3M 8210 (N95) mask with double elastic. This is recommended by the California Department of Public Health and the California Air Resources Board. recommended general public use.  Mostly it’s the N95 rating.  But for as many people who are buying masks, the county public health officer warns that the N95 is not recommended for all. People with chronic medical conditions should check with their health provider to determine if a mask is appropriate for them.

“You would think people who have asthma, emphysema, chronic heart disease would actually benefit most from these masks,” said Sacramento County’s Director of Health Services Dr. Peter Beilenson. “That is actually not true. They are most at risk from these masks because it actually makes it harder to breathe.”  Recommended by CDPH and the California air resources board.

For more information, visit CDPH or ARB.

Are masks available on campus?

Yes, the Student Wellness Center has N95 masks available for SJSU students and employees who present an ID.

Why did SJSU administrators decide to keep campus open Nov. 19-21?

The safety and well-being of our students is a top concern for us, that’s why we closed campus last Thursday and Friday. The air quality index at the time was near 200, a very unhealthy level. Since then, we’ve continuously been monitoring multiple air services to determine when to re-open campus. The air quality has improved (near 156 this morning) and the forecast is for continued improvement over the next few days

There is a student petition with more than 10,000 signatures asking to close the campus. What are you saying to those students?

We truly respect the thoughtful perspective of our students and have been communicating with them through social media and other communication channels. The air quality monitoring services and our own Environmental and Health Safety team indicate the air quality is getting better today and will continue to do so.

Do classrooms in Sweeney Hall require the windows to remain open during lecture because of the lack of air flow?

Sweeney Hall has operable windows.  The HVAC system will condition the space if the windows remain shut.  We have addressed increasing the airflow within the classrooms. Going into the next couple of days the windows should be shut to keep in the heat.

Will staff or faculty need to use sick or vacation time during the closure?

No, staff and faculty will not be required to use or vacation time during the closure.

Will deadlines for petitions be extended due to the closure?

SJSU will be extending deadlines for petitions due this week from Friday, Nov. 16 to Monday, Nov. 26 to allow more time for students who need to:

1.  Submit a petition to withdraw from the semester through Academic Advising and Retention Services

2.  Submit a petition to late drop a course through Academic Advising and Retention Services

3.  Submit a petition for post-census enrollment through the Office of the Registrar

Please feel free to send any questions to vp.adminfinance@sjsu.edu.

 


November 18, 2018, 10:30 p.m.

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on November 18, 2018. We will post updates on this web page as new information becomes available.

To the Spartan Community,

We have received a number of inquiries and requests for reconsideration of our announcement that the campus will be open for classes tomorrow. We truly respect the thoughtful perspectives that were shared by many SJSU students and other university community members. Decisions to close a campus are never made lightly. The needs and well-being of SJSU’s students, faculty, and staff, as well as the surrounding community, are paramount in any discussion regarding the operation of the campus.

A compelling case for closure was made this past week, and we responded by closing the institution last Thursday and Friday. We made the decision to close as the Air Quality Index (AQI) levels were approaching the very unhealthy (above 200) range. Since that time the levels have dropped markedly. While the air quality in the San Jose area is currently in the unhealthy range, the AQI readings this evening are much improved over what they were Thursday and Friday, and the forecast is for continued improvement over the next couple of days.

As previously stated, we encourage any students experiencing health issues to seek medical advice, and we discourage prolonged outdoor activity while the air quality is still less than ideal. However, barring any unforeseen worsening of air quality conditions in the coming hours we anticipate that campus will be available and open, and classes will be in session tomorrow and Tuesday as scheduled. We will continue to monitor conditions and communicate to the university community should conditions change.

Please visit go.sjsu.edu/air and our Twitter and Facebook feeds for any additional updates.

 


November 18, 2018, 2:40 p.m.

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on November 18, 2018.

Dear University Community,

As we shared last week, the San José State University campus will be open for classes and all other business tomorrow and Tuesday, with a regular employee workday and faculty duty day (no classes scheduled) on Wednesday prior to the Thanksgiving holiday break.

We share the concerns of many who have written regarding ongoing air quality issues in our region. Our leadership team is in continual contact with local and regional air quality and environmental agencies to monitor conditions. While we suggest limiting extensive outdoor activity while poor air quality persists, we are assured that conditions are improving and the campus can return to business as usual. Should there be any significant change in conditions we will respond accordingly, but at this time the campus will resume business as usual tomorrow.

We understand that some individuals may experience greater sensitivity to changing environmental conditions. Please consult the Student Wellness Center or your health care provider should you experience health issues.

Our latest updates on current air quality conditions continue to be available at go.sjsu.edu/air and via Twitter and Facebook.

Charlie Faas
Vice President, Administration and Finance


November 15, 2018, 3:10 p.m.

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on November 15, 2018.

Dear University Community,

As announced last evening, San Jose State University is closed today and tomorrow. The campus is currently scheduled to re-open for classes and other campus activities Saturday morning, and will be open as scheduled for classes Monday and Tuesday of next week, and a duty day for employees on Wednesday prior to the Thanksgiving holiday break.

We will continue to monitor air quality and consult with environmental and health experts as we proceed, and will provide any additional updates as needed. Please visit go.sjsu.edu/air and/or SJSU’s Twitter and Facebook accounts for the latest updates.

 


November 14, 2018, 10:58 p.m.

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on November 14, 2018.

Dear University Community,

San Jose State University’s campus will be closed Thursday, Nov. 15 and Friday, Nov. 16 due to unhealthy air quality levels in the Bay Area caused by wildfires throughout the state. The health and well being of students, faculty and staff are of utmost importance to us; we encourage you to continue to heed the advice shared in our earlier campus message to stay safe over the next few days.

Below are answers to some of the questions you may have about the closure:

Will any campus services remain open?

Yes, residence halls, the Dining Commons and Village Market will remain open during the closure Nov. 15-16. All other campus buildings will be closed, including the Spartan Memorial Chapel and Spartan Recreation facilities.

Will the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library remain open?

Yes, the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will remain open during the campus closure Nov. 15-16, but SJSU services will not be available. The library will be open until 9 p.m. on Nov. 15 and from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 16.

Will the Student Wellness Center remain open?

The Student Wellness Center will be closed Friday, Nov. 16, with plans to reopen on Monday, Nov. 19.

Are campus events and extracurricular activities canceled?

Yes, campus events including the Truth Effect have been postponed or canceled; check the SJSU events calendar or connect with event organizers for information on rescheduled dates and times.

Will Saturday classes be canceled?

At this time, the campus closure is effective through Friday, Nov 16. The university leadership team will continue to monitor the air quality situation and will determine if the closure should be extended.

Will online classes continue?

All classes Nov. 15-16 will be canceled, including online classes.

Will anyone be required to report to campus during the closure?

Essential employees should report to work; if you are unclear about your status, please check in with your direct supervisor.

 


November 14, 2018, 4:09 p.m.

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on November 14, 2018.

Dear Campus Community,

On top of the human tragedy caused by the California fires, we are also facing concerns with air quality and our immediate environment. We continue to monitor air quality levels and believe remaining open is still safe and in the best interests of our community, but we encourage people to stay indoors as much as possible. While there are currently no plans to close the campus, some of us may experience health challenges due to the reported air quality. When scheduling classes and activities, faculty should exercise consideration and be sensitive to the fact that people react in different ways to poor air quality.

Precautions we can all consider include:

  • Limiting outdoor activities
  • Setting air conditioning units and car vent systems to re-circulate (to prevent outside air from moving inside)
  • Reducing exposure to smoky air by remaining indoors with windows and doors closed, if possible

A good resource is the Bay Area Air Quality Management District website. The site offers current information on “Spare the Air” alerts, environmental news, and other advisories. Another good resource is the EPA’s Air Quality Index, or AQI, which acts like an air quality “thermometer.”

The safety and well-being of our students, faculty, and staff here at San Jose State are always my utmost concern. Please continue to keep attuned to any further concerns you might hear from students and colleagues, and share those with us at vp.adminfinance@sjsu.edu. We can then do our collective best to respond appropriately.

Thank you,
Charlie Faas
Vice President, Administration and Finance

 

First Steps in A.S. House Relocation Start

The Associated Student (A.S.) House, seen in the background, will be relocated to Tenth Street in January. Photo: David Schmitz

The Associated Student (A.S.) House, seen in the background, will be relocated to Tenth Street in January. Photo: David Schmitz

SJSU Media Relations:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

Following approval by the California State University Board of Trustees for the design of an eight-story high rise Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB) in September that will be built in front of Duncan Hall, Facilities Development and Operations has started preparation for breaking ground this spring on the first new academic building in decades.

One of the first steps to prepare the area will be relocating the Associated Student (A.S.) House from its existing location to the eastern part of campus in a space that is currently used as a parking lot off Tenth Street.

“This has been a long process and I am thrilled about the design, location and cooperation that all disciplines have worked very hard to achieve,” said Charlie Faas, vice president for Administration and Finance.

Associated Student marketing, events and human resources departments have moved to temporary workspaces in the Student Services Center on Tenth Street. Blach Construction began preparation work November 3 for moving the A.S. House that will include attaching beams to the foundation of the house, designing a frame for it and putting wheels on it. Around December 20, additional work will include disassembling the campus gates on San Carlos and Fourth streets as well as San Fernando and Ninth streets, along the route to the new location for the house.

The house is scheduled to be moved on Saturday, January 12, 2019. The campus and Blach Construction team will work with the City of San Jose, PG&E, Comcast, and Bill Brown Contractor to move traffic lights and disconnect overhead utilities during the move, which is anticipated to take six to eight hours. A consultant is working on a traffic plan as well.

Parking Lot 4, located near the Boccardo Business Complex, will be partially closed starting November 12, so the contractor can begin preparing the site for the move and will also be closed the day of the move. There will be 59 spaces lost in Lot 4 permanently once the A.S. House is relocated. The handicap parking area behind the A.S. House will be closed beginning November 12. Additional handicap spaces will be relocated to the South Parking Garage.

Parking Lot 13, located between Duncan Hall and the West garage will be closed, beginning April 15, 2019, when McCarthy Building Company will start mobilizing for construction on the ISB.

The ISB project primarily will serve San Jose State’s College of Science, which currently enrolls more than 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students in programs for biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics and statistics, meteorology and climate science, physics and astronomy, and science education. The college also administers the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

“San Jose State University’s new Interdisciplinary Science Building will provide essential teaching, research and collaboration space for our STEM students, extending learning beyond the classroom. In addition, the building will enhance our growing partnerships with industry leaders in Silicon Valley,” Dean Michael Kaufman said.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

Allied Telesis Pledges $500K Endowment Gift to SJSU’s MTI

Takayoshi Oshima, chairman and CEO of Allied Telesis, signed a gift agreement for $500,000 to the Mineta Transportation Institute in October.

Takayoshi Oshima, chairman and CEO of Allied Telesis, signed a gift agreement for $500,000 with the Mineta Transportation Institute in October. Photo: Nanzi Muro

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1749

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University (SJSU) is pleased to announce a $500,000 gift commitment from Allied Telesis, Inc. to the Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) Strategic Initiatives Fund. The generous gift will establish a permanent endowment to provide long-term sustaining support to MTI’s cybersecurity program. Subject to approval by the Campus Naming Committee and the Academic Senate, the new program will be known as the Allied Telesis National Transportation Security Center.

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business Dean Dan Moshavi, center, signs a gift agreement with Allied Telesis.

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business Dean Dan Moshavi, center, signs a gift agreement with Allied Telesis. Photo: Nanzi Muro

The gift was formally announced Oct. 9 at a reception celebrating the opening of the Mineta Archives in the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library at San Jose State University. Takayoshi Oshima, chairman and CEO of Allied Telesis, a long-time friend of MTI founder and former Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta, has served on the Board of the Mineta Transportation Institute since August 2018. He was recently elected advisor emeritus to the US High Speed Rail Association (USHSR.)

Oshima founded Allied Telesis more than 30 years ago. Allied Telesis has headquarters in Silicon Valley and Japan. The company provides hardware and software products that allow customers to build secure, feature-rich and scalable data exchange solutions. Allied Telesis works with many of the same agencies as MTI in the public transit sector, including the Valley Transportation Authority.

“We started talking about synergy in how we could work together to improve cybersecurity in transportation on a national level,” said Karen Philbrick, executive director of MTI. “Thanks to Allied Telesis’s commitment to a permanent endowment, we can expand our work in this critical area.”

Paul Lanning, vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation, congratulated Philbrick and her team on cultivating a strong partnership with Oshima and Allied Telesis.

“Allied Telesis has provided a tremendous gift that will add value for years to come in the transit sector,” Lanning said. “We hope to continue to build on the success of the Mineta Transportation Institute with this and future industry partnerships.”


About the Mineta Transportation Institute

At the Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) at San Jose State University (SJSU) our mission is to increase mobility for all by improving the safety, efficiency, accessibility, and convenience of our nation’s’ transportation system through research, education, workforce development and technology transfer. We help create a connected world. MTI was founded in 1991 and is funded through the US Departments of Transportation and Homeland Security, the California Department of Transportation, and public and private grants. MTI is affiliated with SJSU’s Lucas College and Graduate School of Business.

About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

MONEY Rankings: SJSU One of Top 10 Colleges for Business Majors

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business students celebrate following commencement in 2017.

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business students celebrate following commencement in 2017.

Media Contacts:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University (SJSU) is pleased to announce that the Lucas College and Graduate School of Business has been named as second among public universities and No. 8 overall on MONEY magazine’s list of the top 10 colleges for business majors in the nation. Earlier this year, MONEY listed the university overall as fourth on a list of most transformative colleges based on alumni earning high salaries while incurring little debt.

“MONEY magazine’s ranking of the Lucas College and Graduate School of Business as number eight of the top 10 colleges for business majors in the nation is a testament to the world-class programs we offer to our students,” said Dean Dan Moshavi. “It is an honor to have our college recognized for the exceptional preparation we offer our students for careers in Silicon Valley and beyond.”

After analyzing 727 colleges and universities for its list of top universities in August, MONEY magazine decided to dig deeper into the data for majors with the highest number of graduates.

“Business is now the most popular undergraduate degree of all,” MONEY said. “In fact, nearly one in five 2017 graduates studied a subject that falls in the category.”

The top 10 colleges for business majors list was created to help future CEOs and budding entrepreneurs find colleges that stand out for accounting, finance, marketing and management classes. MONEY looked at schools that perform best in terms of affordability, educational quality and alumni success, then looked at how many business degrees are awarded each year as well as earnings reported to Payscale.com within three years of graduation.

The Lucas College and Graduate School of business graduated 1,000 students in spring 2018. MONEY listed average starting salaries for recent graduates as $59,900. SJSU is one of two public universities to make the list that includes elite private institutions and one Ivy League campus.

“Thanks to its Silicon Valley location, business grads from SJSU regularly have a foot in the door at Google, Intel, Oracle and other competitive technology firms,” MONEY said.

“This recognition from MONEY magazine reinforces the top education we provide to all our graduates, especially those from our Lucas College and Graduate School of Business,” said SJSU President Mary A. Papazian. “These students have tremendous opportunities whether working on a team of international students through our Thompson Global Internship Program, launching a startup through our IDEAS Lab or engaging in global research through our Mineta Transportation Institute that prepares them to be future leaders in business.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

SJSU Reflects on the History and Future of Athlete Activism

Photo: Josie Lepe Tommie Smith, '69 Social Science, '05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, '05 Honorary Doctorate, pose with the sculpture at San Jose State University that commemorates the courageous stand they took 50 years ago at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City.

Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, pose with the sculpture at San Jose State University that commemorates the courageous stand they took 50 years ago at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Photo: Josie Lepe

Olympians, athletes, scholars and journalists discussed how the history of athlete activism will influence future waves of social justice at San Jose State University’s Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change Words to Action: Landmarks and Legacy of Athlete Activism town hall on Oct. 17.

Follow @SJSUwordstoaction on Twitter for more photos and quotes.

“Let’s understand that this is all part of history,” said Harry Edwards, ’64 Sociology, ’16 Honorary Doctorate, founder with Ken Noel, ’66 BA, ’68 MA, Social Science, of the Olympic Project for Human Rights(OPHR) at SJSU. “Movements are in the DNA of American democracy … the Abolitionist Movement, the Women’s Suffragist Movement, the Civil Rights Movement … They are all an expression of a more perfect union of ‘we the people.’ These movements and activities will continue, wave after wave, with athlete involvement.”

During three sessions, panelists reflected on the history and future of athlete activism. This October marks the 50th anniversary of the historic moment in athlete activism and SJSU history when Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, raised their fists on the medal stand in Mexico City during the 1968 Olympics to protest racial inequality, drawing international attention to athlete activism and the core goals of OPHR.

Panelists Spencer Haywood, Cleve Livingston, Paul Hoffman, Wyomia Tyus, John Carlos and Tommie Smith discuss athlete activism in the 1960s with Moderator Kenneth Shropshire. Photo: Josie Lepe

Panelists Spencer Haywood, Cleve Livingston, Paul Hoffman, Wyomia Tyus, John Carlos and Tommie Smith discuss athlete activism in the 1960s with Moderator Kenneth Shropshire. Photo: Josie Lepe

The Voices of 1968

“It was in the wake of assassinations, of cities burning … you need to understand that to understand the depth of their commitment,” Edwards said. “These two men, along with Lee Evans, are among the most courageous men I have had the privilege of being associated with and working with.”

Smith said he felt a charge to use his talent and access to the world stage to do something for black students in San Jose and around the world.

I was asked to be part of OPHR, to dedicate some part of my running to better America,” Smith said.

Carlos shared the sentiment, adding that their purpose was to bring awareness to social issues.

“We were like a road mapa new paradigm,” Carlos said. “Like with Kaepernick, people said we were anti-flag, anti-military. We wore black gloves because it was the first year the Olympics were televised in color. America had pushed black people down and we were always substandard citizens.”

Panelist Wyomia Tyus, the first person to win consecutive Olympic gold medals in the 100-meter dash, was in the stadium the day of Smith and Carlos’ victory stand.

“I can remember it so vividly,” she said. “I remember thinking, ‘What are those guys doing? What is going on at the victory stand?’ The stadium got very quiet, then there was booing and cheering. I started thinking, ‘I hope nothing happens to them.’”

Carlos reflected on the influence of his and Smith’s actions 50 years later.

“Once you make a statement, if you live or die, they can’t take the statement away,” he said.

Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth Panelists Damion Thomas, Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, Toni Smith-Thompson, and C. Keith Harrison (right) pose with Moderator Bill Rhoden, (second from the right.)

Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth Panelists Damion Thomas, Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, Toni Smith-Thompson, and C. Keith Harrison (right) pose with Moderator Bill Rhoden, (second from the right.) Photo: Josie Lepe

Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth

Bill Rhoden, an award-winning sports journalist, moderated the second panel, Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth.

Long before former San Francisco 49er Colin Kaepernick ignited controversy by sitting, and then kneeling, during the national anthem, in 1996 then-Denver Nuggets NBA player Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf sat out the anthem during a game as he felt it conflicted with his Muslim religion. He was suspended from a game for his actions.

“People have a sense that there is a separation of politics and sports,” Abdul-Rauf said. “But if you stand for a flag, that has a political meaning of its own.”

Panelist Toni Thompson-Smith, a former college athlete and activist who now works with the New York Civil Liberties Union, reflected on a recent Nike ad that features Kaepernick.

“What is the ad selling?” she asked, invoking a 1970 Gil Scott-Heron song. “The revolution will not be televised. It is not selling activism. It is selling inspiration … If activism becomes profitable, is it still the message that we started out with?”

SJSU Alumnus Marc Spears, '95 Journalism, (left) discusses athlete activism from his perspective as a journalist. during The Kaepernick Era panel. Photo: Josie Lepe

SJSU Alumnus Marc Spears, ’95 Journalism, (left) discusses athlete activism from his perspective as a journalist. during The Kaepernick Era panel. Photo: Josie Lepe

The Kaepernick Era

During the final panel on The Kaepernick Era journalists and scholars discussed the role of media in the latest wave of athlete activism.

“We have Colin who makes this move that is important and historic,” said Howard Bryant, senior writer for ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com. “But more important is the reaction to him on both sides and the way so many players decided not to react.”

Nate Boyer, a former active duty Green Beret and former professional football player with the Seattle Seahawks, had his own view on Kaepernick’s actions. Boyer is credited with encouraging Kaepernick to kneel, rather than sit, during the anthem.

“The flag is a beacon of hope,” he said. “I don’t think it’s an oppressive symbol. We need to continue to fight oppression in this country. It’s got to be with people like Colin Kaepernick to take that lead, to be a voice but also to listen.”

SJSU alumnus and a senior writer for ESPN’s The Undefeated Marc Spears suggested diversifying newsrooms as a way to further conversations.

“That’s why Mr. Rhoden is such a legend,” said Spears, ’95 Journalism. “He is such a legend. I wanted to be him for so long. There needs to be more Mr. Rhodens and Ms. Rhodens. If there are any women out there that want to be sports journalists, we need those voices.”

The town hall was sponsored in part by the San Francisco 49ers, ESPN and Associated Students of SJSU.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

SJSU Art Alumnus Receives MacArthur ‘Genius’ Award

Titus Kaphar, '01 B.F.A., is a painter and sculptor who addresses the lack of representation of people of color in the history of Western art by appropriating Western art’s styles and mediums. Here he is pictured in his studio in New haven, CT. (Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Titus Kaphar, ’01 B.F.A., is a painter and sculptor who addresses the lack of representation of people of color in the history of Western art by appropriating Western art’s styles and mediums. Here he is pictured in his studio in New haven, CT. (Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1749

SAN JOSE, CA – The MacArthur Foundation announced its 2018 MacArthur Fellows October 4, with San Jose State University Alumnus Titus Kaphar, ’01 B.F.A., among this year’s recipients of the “genius” award. Kaphar is an artist whose paintings, sculptures and installations explore the intersection of art, history and civic agency.

“I make paintings that people perceive often as being very social or political, but for the most part they are very personal. Everything stems from my relationship to a situation, to a narrative, to a story.”

“I make paintings that people perceive often as being very social or political, but for the most part they are very personal,” he said. “Everything stems from my relationship to a situation, to a narrative, to a story.”

This is especially on display in the work he calls the Jerome Project, inspired by his father. His father, whose first name is Jerome, was in and out of jail.  At one point Kaphar searched for his father’s name online. He found his father’s mug shot, along with police photos of 97 men with the same first and last name. He began to paint the images to look like small devotionals that he then partially covered with tar.

Much of Kaphar’s work highlights the lack of representation of people of color in the canon of Western Art with works that deconstruct the literal and visual structure of the artwork. His canvases often have top layers cut away to reveal hidden images underneath. He recalled that during his time as a university student he had one art history book that had a chapter focused on black people or people of color.

“These characters are often enslaved, in servitude, or impoverished,” he said. “So it drew me to wanting to understand how this all came about in representing black people.”

Titus Kaphar displays some of his work in his New Haven, Connecticut studio.(Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Titus Kaphar displays some of his work in his New Haven, Connecticut studio. (Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Kaphar’s work has been exhibited at MoMA PS1, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia), the Seattle Art Museum, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, and Princeton University, among other venues; and he is represented in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Pérez Art Museum Miami, and the Equal Justice Initiative Museum in Montgomery, Alabama, among other public collections.

In addition to his artwork and installations, Kaphar is the founder and president of NXTHVN, pronounced Next Haven. The nonprofit is creating an artist community that will provide mentorship, studio practice and professional development opportunities for recent art school graduates.

“They get a year to engage in professional art,” he said. “I was in my mid-20s when I found art so I want to help other young folks who come from the communities I came from discover their passion and what motivates them.”

Kaphar is one of 25 Fellows selected for exceptional creativity, promise for important future advances based on past accomplishments and potential for the fellowship to facilitate subsequent creative work.

“Working in diverse fields, from the arts and sciences to public health and civil liberties, these 25 MacArthur Fellows are solving long-standing scientific and mathematical problems, pushing art forms into new and emerging territories, and addressing the urgent needs of under-resourced communities,” said Cecilia Conrad, Managing Director, MacArthur Fellows Program. “Their exceptional creativity inspires hope in us all.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Presents Words to Action: Landmarks and Legacy of Athlete Activism

 

This October is the 50th anniversary of a historic moment in athlete activism and San Jose State University history. During the 1968 Olympic Games, Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, raised their fists on the medal stand in Mexico City to protest racial inequality, drawing international attention to athlete activism and the core goals of the Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR).

Join us for our town hall, Words to Action: Landmarks and Legacy of Athlete Activism, on October 17. We have an exciting lineup of panelists who will reflect on OPHR’s 50-year legacy and its connection to the current wave of athlete activism.

Date:

October 17, 2018
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Location:

The Event Center at SJSU
290 S. 7th St., San Jose, CA 95112 (parking)

Panelists:

  • Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, former basketball player, Denver Nuggets, Sacramento Kings and the Vancouver Grizzlies
  • Nate Boyer, former active duty Green Beret and professional football player with the Seattle Seahawks
  • Howard Bryant, author and senior writer, ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com
  • John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, Olympic medalist and OPHR member
  • Harry Edwards, ’64 Sociology, ’16 Honorary Doctorate, OPHR and ISSSSC founder
  • Spencer Haywood, former basketball player and Olympic gold medalist
  • Paul Hoffman, coxswain, U.S. Olympic rowing team for the 1968 Olympics
  • Cleve Livingston, member, U.S. Olympic rowing team for the 1968 Olympics
  • Bill Rhoden, author and former Peabody-award winning sports columnist, writer-at-large for ESPN’s The Undefeated
  • Kenneth Shropshire, Adidas Distinguished Professor of Global Sport and CEO of the Global Sport Institute at Arizona State University
  • Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, Olympic gold medalist and world record setter
  • Toni Smith-Thompson, former college athlete and activist, advocacy department organizer, New York Civil Liberties Union
  • Marc Spears, ’95 Journalism, senior writer for ESPN’s The Undefeated
  • Damion Thomas, author and curator of sports at the National Museum of African American History and Culture
  • Wyomia Tyus, Olympic gold medalist
  • Steve Wyche, reporter, NFL Network

Agenda:

8 a.m. Media registration

8:30 a.m. Program begins

Introduction

Paul Lanning, CEO, Tower Foundation of SJSU

Welcome

Mary A. Papazian, President, SJSU

SJSU Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change

Ted Butryn, ISSSSC Interim Director

Panel 1: The Voices of 1968

Olympians who both experienced and actively participated in the events of Mexico City in 1968 share their stories and the repercussions of their actions when they returned home.

Moderator:

  • Kenneth Shropshire

Panelists:

  • John Carlos
  • Spencer Haywood
  • Paul Hoffman
  • Cleve Livingston
  • Tommie Smith
  • Wyomia Tyus

Break

Panel 2: Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth

In the 1980s and 90s, athletes gained economic and social capital, but were less likely to engage in athlete activism. Athlete-activists and scholars discuss those who came forward to stand for social justice issues.

Moderator:

  • Bill Rhoden

Panelists:

  • Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf
  • C. Keith Harrison
  • Toni Smith-Thompson
  • Damion Thomas

Panel 3 – The Kaepernick Era

What is the social impact of today’s activism by professional, college and high school athletes against police brutality and social injustices, and the larger trend against the “shut up and dribble” sentiment? Panelists discuss how a 50-year history has led to a new wave of activism.

Moderator:

  • Maureen Smith

Panelists:

  • Nate Boyer
  • Jules Boykoff
  • Howard Bryant
  • Marc Spears
  • Steve Wyche

Concluding Remarks: The Arc of Athlete Activism

Harry Edwards lends perspective and insight on the waves of athlete activism to date, from the earliest pioneers to the voices of today, and provides his thoughts on the power of protest and what we can expect to see next in the politically charged era in which we find ourselves today.

Press opportunity immediately follows

Media:

Members of the media should RSVP now to:

Robin McElhatton
robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu,
408-924-1749

Professional video and photography will be available upon request.

Tickets

Tickets for students, faculty, staff and the public are available online.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study—offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

Cal-Bridge Grant Readies SJSU Undergrads to Apply for PhDs in Physics and Astronomy

Students, faculty and administrators for the Cal-Bridge North program pose for a photo. Cal-Bridge scholars prepare to apply for PhD programs in physics and astronomy.

Students, faculty and administrators for the Cal-Bridge North program pose for a photo. Cal-Bridge scholars prepare to apply for PhD programs in physics and astronomy.

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA– San Jose State University joins a consortium of 15 California State University (CSU) and nine University of California (UC) campuses collectively awarded a five-year, $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to dramatically increase diversity within the fields of physics and astronomy through the Cal-Bridge program.

The Cal-Bridge program launched four years ago. It creates a pathway for underrepresented minority students from multiple CSU campuses to gain the experience needed to apply for doctoral programs in physics and astronomy at UC campuses across California. Currently, students from underrepresented minority groups represent 30 percent of the U.S. population, but represent less than 4 percent of physics and astronomy PhDs recipients nationwide. The national average of underrepresented minorities, or URM students, earning a PhD in these fields is about 80 per year.

“Cal-Bridge has already shown spectacular results in its first phase in Southern California, with a 95 percent admission rate for CSU undergraduates into doctoral programs,” said Aaron Romanowsky, an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at SJSU and co-director of the Cal-Bridge North Leadership Council. “Now with the expansion of the program into Northern California, and into physics as well as astronomy, we are excited to begin seeing even more access enabled for CSU students going into advanced STEM education and careers.”

Expanding into Northern California

The recent grant allows Cal-Bridge to expand from about a dozen scholars per year to as many as 50 statewide, with the addition of students from SJSU, San Francisco State, CSU East Bay and CSU Sacramento. SJSU is serving as a lead institution for Cal-Bridge North, with the support of Romanowsky and College of Science Dean Michael Kaufman, former chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. SJSU students Jean Donet and Javier Bustamante joined the first cohort of Cal-Bridge North. Participating Cal-Bridge Scholars receive a full scholarship for the final two years of their undergraduate degree, based on demonstrated need; a year of scholarship funding to cover the first year of graduate school at a participating UC campus; mentoring from faculty members at both CSU and UC campuses; professional development opportunities and research opportunities.

Cal-Bridge is led by Principal Investigator and Director Alexander Rudolph, a Cal Poly Pomona professor of physics and astronomy. Cal-Bridge Scholars are recruited from the 15 CSU campuses and more than 30 community colleges in the Cal-Bridge network, with the help of local faculty and staff liaisons at each campus.

Success for Early Cohorts

The program has been highly successful in its first five years in developing a pipeline of highly diverse, qualified scholars, many of whom have already successfully matriculated to a PhD program in physics or astronomy. The program just selected its fifth cohort of 27 scholars from 10 different CSU campuses across the state, bringing the total number of scholars to 61 in five cohorts, including 35 Latinos, seven African-Americans and 27 women (16 of the 27 women are from underrepresented minority groups).

In the last three years, 19 of 21 Cal-Bridge Scholars who have earned their bachelor’s degree in physics have begun or will attend PhD programs in physics or astronomy at top programs nationally, including UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, Harvard University, Northwestern University, the University of Maryland, Michigan State University and Penn State University.

Learn more about Cal-Bridge and watch a video about the program online.

CAL-BRIDGE CONTACT

Alexander Rudolph

Director, Cal-Bridge

Professor of Physics and Astronomy

Cal Poly Pomona

Email: alrudolph@cpp.edu

Cell Phone: 909-717-1851

LOCAL CONTACT

Aaron Romanowsky

Co-Director, Cal-Bridge North Leadership Council

Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy

San Jose State University

Email: aaron.romanowsky@sjsu.edu

About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

PayScale Ranks SJSU Education Majors #6 in the Nation for Salary Potential

Graduates from the Connie L. Lurie College of Education line up outside the Event Center for Commencement in spring 2018. (Photo: Brandon Chew)

Graduates from the Connie L. Lurie College of Education line up outside the Event Center for Commencement in spring 2018. (Photo: Brandon Chew)

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – Payscale, an online platform that analyzes salaries, listed San Jose State University as the sixth best school in the nation for education majors for salary potential. The company released its College Salary Report for 2018 on September 25. The report found that SJSU graduates with a bachelor’s degree in education had an early-career pay rate of $45,500 and a mid-career pay rate of $75,300. The list includes more than 380 nonprofit and public universities that offer undergraduate degrees in education.

In spring 2018, SJSU recognized 300 newly credentialed teachers and conferred 14 doctoral degrees in educational leadership.

“We are immensely proud of the talented and dedicated educators that graduate from SJSU,” said Dean Heather Lattimer, of the Connie L. Lurie College of Education. “They are having a significant impact as classroom teachers, counselors, and school leaders working to strengthen educational outcomes and close opportunity gaps. It is rewarding to have our college recognized as #6 in the nation for salary potential for education majors.”

Assistant Professor Ellen Middaugh interacts with students in her Sweeney Hall classroom on September 26, 2018. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

Assistant Professor Ellen Middaugh interacts with students in her Sweeney Hall classroom on September 26, 2018. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

The university ranked #28 overall out of 600 public universities in the nation, with early-career pay rates of $61,300 and mid-career pay rates of $112,400. Of those Spartan alumni who participated in the survey, 54 percent of respondents also said they felt their work makes the world a better place.

PayScale is a software company that uses big data and algorithms to help companies make compensation decisions while also providing information to employees about their industries salary trends.

Recent Rankings

In addition to this week’s announcement from PayScale, MONEY Magazine recently named SJSU as the fourth most transformative universities for students while U.S. News & World Report ranked it fifth among the West’s top public universities offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Diverse Issues in Higher Education also ranked SJSU among the nation’s top universities for granting degrees to minority students.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

Alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos to Receive the San Jose State University Tower Award

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos have been named this year’s recipients of the university’s highest honor, the Tower Award. Smith and Carlos will receive the award at San Jose State’s annual Inspiration to Innovation gala, a fundraiser to be held October 18 at the Event Center at SJSU.

“San Jose State University alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos felt the fate of the nation resting on their shoulders when they made their unforgettable statement in support of human rights and dignity,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “As SJSU marks the 50th anniversary of their courageous act, we seek to recognize these alumni for risking everything to bring worldwide attention to the defining issue of their time, one that still resonates today.”

Smith and Carlos were SJSU track and field team members when they qualified to compete in the 1968 Olympics, held in Mexico City. After earning gold and bronze medals, respectively, they chose to bow their heads and raise gloved fists on the medal stand while the national anthem was played. In doing so, they created their iconic moment in athlete activism during one of the most tumultuous times in modern U.S. history.

From athletes to activists

“The Tower Award is given to San Jose State University exemplars whose personal stories embody the grit and determination that make us Spartans,” said Paul Lanning, vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation. “Without saying one word, alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos sent a message that reverberated from 1968 through today, and for this they will receive the 2018 Tower Award at SJSU’s annual Inspiration to Innovation gala.”

For what the International Olympic Committee reportedly described as an “outrageous stance,” Smith and Carlos were evicted from the Olympic Village in Mexico City and sent back to the United States. Nearly 40 years later, SJSU student Erik Grotz, who was surprised to learn that Smith and Carlos were alumni, suggested that the campus memorialize their peaceful protest. In 2005, the Associated Students of SJSU unveiled, in the heart of campus, a 23-foot-tall landmark sculpture of the two athletes.

Today, visitors from around the world act on the sculpture’s signature invitation to take a stand by posing in the silver medal position where Australian Olympian Peter Norman stood in 1968, an arrangement discussed with and approved by Norman before his death in 2006.

San Jose’s Speed City era

Between 1941 and 1970, 91 Spartans were ranked in the top 10 worldwide by Track and Field News, 27 were Olympians, and men’s track and field won the NCAA team title in 1969. Smith and Carlos were SJSU track and field team members during this time, when San Jose was known as Speed City, with the legendary Lloyd “Bud” Winter as head coach.

Raised in Texas and California, Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, coached track and field at Oberlin College, where he also taught sociology, and later at Santa Monica College. He is the author of Silent Gesture: The Autobiography of Tommie Smith.

A native of New York, John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, pursued professional football and later worked for the United States Olympic Committee. He is the author, with Dave Zirin, of The John Carlos Story: The Sports Moment That Changed the World, this year’s Campus Reading Program selection.

Continuing the dialogue

SJSU is the birthplace of the Olympic Project for Human Rights, a movement led by SJSU alumnus and instructor Harry Edwards, who went on to become a world-renown sports sociologist. The project inspired Smith and Carlos’ now-historic stand.

Edwards, Smith, Carlos and others founded the SJSU Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change in 2017. The institute seeks to continue the dialogue about athlete activism and the influence of sport in effecting positive social change.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties to Receive 2018 Community Partner Award at SJSU’s Inspiration to Innovation Gala

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University is pleased to announce that Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties will be the recipient of the 2018 Community Partner Award in recognition of its support to Spartans as they seek to positively impact the campus, region and world. Over the past two years, Second Harvest has provided $430,000 in groceries to thousands of SJSU students.

San Jose State and Second Harvest are preparing to open SJSU’s first permanent food pantry. The Spartan Food Pantry will look and operate much like a neighborhood market with one major difference: Everything inside will be offered at no cost to all eligible students.

“When San Jose State University learned that approximately half of our students are skipping meals to make ends meet, we knew we had to do something big,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “SJSU would like to thank Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties for working with us every step of the way as we prepare to open the Spartan Food Pantry, which will ensure our students have what they need to prepare nutritious meals while completing their studies.”

Second Harvest will receive the award at San Jose State’s annual Inspiration to Innovation gala, a fundraiser to be held October 18 at The Event Center at SJSU. This year’s gala will focus on eliminating food insecurity among SJSU students.

Sponsors include Cisco Systems, Edgeman Coaching LLC, Executive Edge of Silicon Valley, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, the Iwata Family Foundation, Arthur Lund and Agnieszka Winkler, Constance Moore and Roger Greer, Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp, San Francisco 49ers, Sphere 3D, and Zenefits.

The foundation of a healthy, productive life

“Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties is honored to receive the 2018 Community Partner Award from San Jose State University,” Second Harvest CEO Leslie Bacho said. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to expand our services and to provide vital support to SJSU students because nutritious food is the foundation of a healthy, productive life.”

The gala will be held one day after the SJSU Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change’s town hall focusing on the 50th anniversary of the moment students Tommie Smith and John Carlos took a stand for human rights at the 1968 Olympics.

“The town hall and gala will celebrate the role the San Jose State University community has played in seeking innovative approaches to social justice issues,” said Paul Lanning, vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation of SJSU. “Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties’ commitment to supporting SJSU as we prepare to open the university’s first permanent food pantry is yet another example of the innovative work under way here.”

Many food banks were born of efforts to eliminate poverty and racial injustice during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. The Food Bank, Inc. of Santa Clara County was formed in 1974, and incorporated as a non-profit agency in 1979. In 1988, the San Mateo County Food Bank merged with The Food Bank, Inc. of Santa Clara County to become Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties.

A modern grocery store, with one major difference

The Spartan Food Pantry will be located inside the newly renovated and expanded Diaz Compean Student Union, a central location near many student services. The 1,000-square-foot space will offer fresh produce, fresh and frozen meats, milk, bread, canned goods, personal hygiene products and more arranged in coolers, freezers and shelving much like modern grocery stores. The doors are slated to open this academic year.

San Jose State wishes to express its gratitude to the California State University Chancellor’s Office and supporters of Senate Bill 85, through which SJSU will receive $130,000 to ensure students have access to the basics they need to persist and earn their degrees.

“The time has come for a permanent food pantry at San Jose State University, and we could not have asked for a better partner than Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties,” Vice President for Student Affairs Patrick Day said. “On behalf of the entire SJSU community, including those who have been working hard for years to address this basic human need, I would like to thank everyone at Second Harvest Food Bank.”

A community committed to ending food insecurity

San Jose State began addressing food insecurity in 2008 by distributing $10 gift cards redeemable at campus eateries. A committee of faculty, staff, administrators and students has been meeting ever since to formalize efforts, including studies and solutions such as the Associated Students of SJSU Community Garden, an @SJSUFreeFood Twitter handle, and small food shelves in various departmental offices throughout campus.

San Jose State and Second Harvest Food Bank began working together in 2015, when Second Harvest helped train SJSU officials on CalFresh registration for students. In October 2016, SJSU and Second Harvest introduced the Just In Time Mobile Food Pantry, offering fresh produce, refrigerated and frozen groceries, and high-quality, shelf-stable foods on a monthly basis at no cost to eligible students.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

Plans Approved for San Jose State University’s Interdisciplinary Science Building

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings.

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings.

SJSU Media Relations:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University received final approval today from the California State University Board of Trustees for plans to build an eight-story, 161,200-square-foot, $181 million Interdisciplinary Science Building.

“On behalf of San Jose State University, I would like to thank the California State University Board of Trustees for approving our Interdisciplinary Science Building and supporting our efforts to bring our students a new cutting-edge academic research and teaching building befitting SJSU’s location in the heart of Silicon Valley,” President Mary A. Papazian said.

The Interdisciplinary Science Building will be financed with CSU Systemwide Revenue Bonds, campus designated capital reserves, auxiliary reserves, and continuing education reserves.

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings. The current Science Building was completed in 1957 and Duncan Hall in 1967, making the ISB the first new science building in more than a half century.

Construction is slated to begin in 2019, and anticipated to be completed in 2021. The collaborative design/build contractor is McCarthy Building Companies, Inc. The project architect is FLAD Architects

Supporting collaboration and partnerships

The project primarily will serve San Jose State’s College of Science, which currently enrolls more than 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students in programs for biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics and statistics, meteorology and climate science, physics and astronomy, and science education. The college also administers the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

ISB building

The eight-story, 161,200-square-foot structure will contain chemistry and biology labs and more.

“San Jose State University’s new Interdisciplinary Science Building will provide essential teaching, research and collaboration space for our STEM students, extending learning beyond the classroom. In addition, the building will enhance our growing partnerships with industry leaders in Silicon Valley,” Dean Michael Kaufman said.

  • Features will including the following:
    Biology and chemistry teaching and research labs, collaboration space, 41 faculty offices, and administrative and support areas.
  • A mentoring hub on each floor where students will work on interdisciplinary projects, connect with faculty, and meet with industry partners.
  • A collaborative core in hallways between classrooms and research labs that will allow student and faculty researchers to brainstorm and plan their projects.
  • A high-performance computing suite for astronomers, physicists, social scientists, health professionals and more, where students and faculty from different disciplines can share their work and improve their research techniques.

Designed to meet or exceed environmental standards

“San Jose State University’s Interdisciplinary Science Building will be forward-looking—to the future of education and of Silicon Valley,” Vice President for Administration and Finance Charlie Faas said. “The proposed approach enables the campus to best use its limited land base to increase campus density to accommodate the academic program.”

This project will be designed to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver and target LEED Gold in order to meet the sustainability objectives of the campus by using an efficient building envelope that will reduce heating and cooling demand.

Other sustainable design features will include efficient LED lighting systems, a cool roof, and the use of recycled water in restrooms and for landscape irrigation.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.