First Steps in A.S. House Relocation Start

The Associated Student (A.S.) House, seen in the background, will be relocated to Tenth Street in January. Photo: David Schmitz

The Associated Student (A.S.) House, seen in the background, will be relocated to Tenth Street in January. Photo: David Schmitz

SJSU Media Relations:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

Following approval by the California State University Board of Trustees for the design of an eight-story high rise Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB) in September that will be built in front of Duncan Hall, Facilities Development and Operations has started preparation for breaking ground this spring on the first new academic building in decades.

One of the first steps to prepare the area will be relocating the Associated Student (A.S.) House from its existing location to the eastern part of campus in a space that is currently used as a parking lot off Tenth Street.

“This has been a long process and I am thrilled about the design, location and cooperation that all disciplines have worked very hard to achieve,” said Charlie Faas, vice president for Administration and Finance.

Associated Student marketing, events and human resources departments have moved to temporary workspaces in the Student Services Center on Tenth Street. Blach Construction began preparation work November 3 for moving the A.S. House that will include attaching beams to the foundation of the house, designing a frame for it and putting wheels on it. Around December 20, additional work will include disassembling the campus gates on San Carlos and Fourth streets as well as San Fernando and Ninth streets, along the route to the new location for the house.

The house is scheduled to be moved on Saturday, January 12, 2018. The campus and Blach Construction team will work with the City of San Jose, PG&E, Comcast, and Bill Brown Contractor to move traffic lights and disconnect overhead utilities during the move, which is anticipated to take six to eight hours. A consultant is working on a traffic plan as well.

Parking Lot 4, located near the Boccardo Business Complex, will be partially closed starting November 12, so the contractor can begin preparing the site for the move and will also be closed the day of the move. There will be 59 spaces lost in Lot 4 permanently once the A.S. House is relocated. The handicap parking area behind the A.S. House will be closed beginning November 12. Additional handicap spaces will be relocated to the South Parking Garage.

Parking Lot 13, located between Duncan Hall and the West garage will be closed, beginning April 15, 2019, when McCarthy Building Company will start mobilizing for construction on the ISB.

The ISB project primarily will serve San Jose State’s College of Science, which currently enrolls more than 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students in programs for biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics and statistics, meteorology and climate science, physics and astronomy, and science education. The college also administers the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

“San Jose State University’s new Interdisciplinary Science Building will provide essential teaching, research and collaboration space for our STEM students, extending learning beyond the classroom. In addition, the building will enhance our growing partnerships with industry leaders in Silicon Valley,” Dean Michael Kaufman said.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

Allied Telesis Pledges $500K Endowment Gift to SJSU’s MTI

Takayoshi Oshima, chairman and CEO of Allied Telesis, signed a gift agreement for $500,000 to the Mineta Transportation Institute in October.

Takayoshi Oshima, chairman and CEO of Allied Telesis, signed a gift agreement for $500,000 with the Mineta Transportation Institute in October. Photo: Nanzi Muro

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1749

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University (SJSU) is pleased to announce a $500,000 gift commitment from Allied Telesis, Inc. to the Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) Strategic Initiatives Fund. The generous gift will establish a permanent endowment to provide long-term sustaining support to MTI’s cybersecurity program. Subject to approval by the Campus Naming Committee and the Academic Senate, the new program will be known as the Allied Telesis National Transportation Security Center.

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business Dean Dan Moshavi, center, signs a gift agreement with Allied Telesis.

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business Dean Dan Moshavi, center, signs a gift agreement with Allied Telesis. Photo: Nanzi Muro

The gift was formally announced Oct. 9 at a reception celebrating the opening of the Mineta Archives in the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library at San Jose State University. Takayoshi Oshima, chairman and CEO of Allied Telesis, a long-time friend of MTI founder and former Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta, has served on the Board of the Mineta Transportation Institute since August 2018. He was recently elected advisor emeritus to the US High Speed Rail Association (USHSR.)

Oshima founded Allied Telesis more than 30 years ago. Allied Telesis has headquarters in Silicon Valley and Japan. The company provides hardware and software products that allow customers to build secure, feature-rich and scalable data exchange solutions. Allied Telesis works with many of the same agencies as MTI in the public transit sector, including the Valley Transportation Authority.

“We started talking about synergy in how we could work together to improve cybersecurity in transportation on a national level,” said Karen Philbrick, executive director of MTI. “Thanks to Allied Telesis’s commitment to a permanent endowment, we can expand our work in this critical area.”

Paul Lanning, vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation, congratulated Philbrick and her team on cultivating a strong partnership with Oshima and Allied Telesis.

“Allied Telesis has provided a tremendous gift that will add value for years to come in the transit sector,” Lanning said. “We hope to continue to build on the success of the Mineta Transportation Institute with this and future industry partnerships.”


About the Mineta Transportation Institute

At the Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) at San Jose State University (SJSU) our mission is to increase mobility for all by improving the safety, efficiency, accessibility, and convenience of our nation’s’ transportation system through research, education, workforce development and technology transfer. We help create a connected world. MTI was founded in 1991 and is funded through the US Departments of Transportation and Homeland Security, the California Department of Transportation, and public and private grants. MTI is affiliated with SJSU’s Lucas College and Graduate School of Business.

About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

MONEY Rankings: SJSU One of Top 10 Colleges for Business Majors

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business students celebrate following commencement in 2017.

Lucas College and Graduate School of Business students celebrate following commencement in 2017.

Media Contacts:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University (SJSU) is pleased to announce that the Lucas College and Graduate School of Business has been named as second among public universities and No. 8 overall on MONEY magazine’s list of the top 10 colleges for business majors in the nation. Earlier this year, MONEY listed the university overall as fourth on a list of most transformative colleges based on alumni earning high salaries while incurring little debt.

“MONEY magazine’s ranking of the Lucas College and Graduate School of Business as number eight of the top 10 colleges for business majors in the nation is a testament to the world-class programs we offer to our students,” said Dean Dan Moshavi. “It is an honor to have our college recognized for the exceptional preparation we offer our students for careers in Silicon Valley and beyond.”

After analyzing 727 colleges and universities for its list of top universities in August, MONEY magazine decided to dig deeper into the data for majors with the highest number of graduates.

“Business is now the most popular undergraduate degree of all,” MONEY said. “In fact, nearly one in five 2017 graduates studied a subject that falls in the category.”

The top 10 colleges for business majors list was created to help future CEOs and budding entrepreneurs find colleges that stand out for accounting, finance, marketing and management classes. MONEY looked at schools that perform best in terms of affordability, educational quality and alumni success, then looked at how many business degrees are awarded each year as well as earnings reported to Payscale.com within three years of graduation.

The Lucas College and Graduate School of business graduated 1,000 students in spring 2018. MONEY listed average starting salaries for recent graduates as $59,900. SJSU is one of two public universities to make the list that includes elite private institutions and one Ivy League campus.

“Thanks to its Silicon Valley location, business grads from SJSU regularly have a foot in the door at Google, Intel, Oracle and other competitive technology firms,” MONEY said.

“This recognition from MONEY magazine reinforces the top education we provide to all our graduates, especially those from our Lucas College and Graduate School of Business,” said SJSU President Mary A. Papazian. “These students have tremendous opportunities whether working on a team of international students through our Thompson Global Internship Program, launching a startup through our IDEAS Lab or engaging in global research through our Mineta Transportation Institute that prepares them to be future leaders in business.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

SJSU Reflects on the History and Future of Athlete Activism

Photo: Josie Lepe Tommie Smith, '69 Social Science, '05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, '05 Honorary Doctorate, pose with the sculpture at San Jose State University that commemorates the courageous stand they took 50 years ago at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City.

Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, pose with the sculpture at San Jose State University that commemorates the courageous stand they took 50 years ago at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Photo: Josie Lepe

Olympians, athletes, scholars and journalists discussed how the history of athlete activism will influence future waves of social justice at San Jose State University’s Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change Words to Action: Landmarks and Legacy of Athlete Activism town hall on Oct. 17.

Follow @SJSUwordstoaction on Twitter for more photos and quotes.

“Let’s understand that this is all part of history,” said Harry Edwards, ’64 Sociology, ’16 Honorary Doctorate, founder with Ken Noel, ’66 BA, ’68 MA, Social Science, of the Olympic Project for Human Rights(OPHR) at SJSU. “Movements are in the DNA of American democracy … the Abolitionist Movement, the Women’s Suffragist Movement, the Civil Rights Movement … They are all an expression of a more perfect union of ‘we the people.’ These movements and activities will continue, wave after wave, with athlete involvement.”

During three sessions, panelists reflected on the history and future of athlete activism. This October marks the 50th anniversary of the historic moment in athlete activism and SJSU history when Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, raised their fists on the medal stand in Mexico City during the 1968 Olympics to protest racial inequality, drawing international attention to athlete activism and the core goals of OPHR.

Panelists Spencer Haywood, Cleve Livingston, Paul Hoffman, Wyomia Tyus, John Carlos and Tommie Smith discuss athlete activism in the 1960s with Moderator Kenneth Shropshire. Photo: Josie Lepe

Panelists Spencer Haywood, Cleve Livingston, Paul Hoffman, Wyomia Tyus, John Carlos and Tommie Smith discuss athlete activism in the 1960s with Moderator Kenneth Shropshire. Photo: Josie Lepe

The Voices of 1968

“It was in the wake of assassinations, of cities burning … you need to understand that to understand the depth of their commitment,” Edwards said. “These two men, along with Lee Evans, are among the most courageous men I have had the privilege of being associated with and working with.”

Smith said he felt a charge to use his talent and access to the world stage to do something for black students in San Jose and around the world.

I was asked to be part of OPHR, to dedicate some part of my running to better America,” Smith said.

Carlos shared the sentiment, adding that their purpose was to bring awareness to social issues.

“We were like a road mapa new paradigm,” Carlos said. “Like with Kaepernick, people said we were anti-flag, anti-military. We wore black gloves because it was the first year the Olympics were televised in color. America had pushed black people down and we were always substandard citizens.”

Panelist Wyomia Tyus, the first person to win consecutive Olympic gold medals in the 100-meter dash, was in the stadium the day of Smith and Carlos’ victory stand.

“I can remember it so vividly,” she said. “I remember thinking, ‘What are those guys doing? What is going on at the victory stand?’ The stadium got very quiet, then there was booing and cheering. I started thinking, ‘I hope nothing happens to them.’”

Carlos reflected on the influence of his and Smith’s actions 50 years later.

“Once you make a statement, if you live or die, they can’t take the statement away,” he said.

Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth Panelists Damion Thomas, Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, Toni Smith-Thompson, and C. Keith Harrison (right) pose with Moderator Bill Rhoden, (second from the right.)

Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth Panelists Damion Thomas, Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, Toni Smith-Thompson, and C. Keith Harrison (right) pose with Moderator Bill Rhoden, (second from the right.) Photo: Josie Lepe

Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth

Bill Rhoden, an award-winning sports journalist, moderated the second panel, Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth.

Long before former San Francisco 49er Colin Kaepernick ignited controversy by sitting, and then kneeling, during the national anthem, in 1996 then-Denver Nuggets NBA player Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf sat out the anthem during a game as he felt it conflicted with his Muslim religion. He was suspended from a game for his actions.

“People have a sense that there is a separation of politics and sports,” Abdul-Rauf said. “But if you stand for a flag, that has a political meaning of its own.”

Panelist Toni Thompson-Smith, a former college athlete and activist who now works with the New York Civil Liberties Union, reflected on a recent Nike ad that features Kaepernick.

“What is the ad selling?” she asked, invoking a 1970 Gil Scott-Heron song. “The revolution will not be televised. It is not selling activism. It is selling inspiration … If activism becomes profitable, is it still the message that we started out with?”

SJSU Alumnus Marc Spears, '95 Journalism, (left) discusses athlete activism from his perspective as a journalist. during The Kaepernick Era panel. Photo: Josie Lepe

SJSU Alumnus Marc Spears, ’95 Journalism, (left) discusses athlete activism from his perspective as a journalist. during The Kaepernick Era panel. Photo: Josie Lepe

The Kaepernick Era

During the final panel on The Kaepernick Era journalists and scholars discussed the role of media in the latest wave of athlete activism.

“We have Colin who makes this move that is important and historic,” said Howard Bryant, senior writer for ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com. “But more important is the reaction to him on both sides and the way so many players decided not to react.”

Nate Boyer, a former active duty Green Beret and former professional football player with the Seattle Seahawks, had his own view on Kaepernick’s actions. Boyer is credited with encouraging Kaepernick to kneel, rather than sit, during the anthem.

“The flag is a beacon of hope,” he said. “I don’t think it’s an oppressive symbol. We need to continue to fight oppression in this country. It’s got to be with people like Colin Kaepernick to take that lead, to be a voice but also to listen.”

SJSU alumnus and a senior writer for ESPN’s The Undefeated Marc Spears suggested diversifying newsrooms as a way to further conversations.

“That’s why Mr. Rhoden is such a legend,” said Spears, ’95 Journalism. “He is such a legend. I wanted to be him for so long. There needs to be more Mr. Rhodens and Ms. Rhodens. If there are any women out there that want to be sports journalists, we need those voices.”

The town hall was sponsored in part by the San Francisco 49ers, ESPN and Associated Students of SJSU.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

SJSU Art Alumnus Receives MacArthur ‘Genius’ Award

Titus Kaphar, '01 B.F.A., is a painter and sculptor who addresses the lack of representation of people of color in the history of Western art by appropriating Western art’s styles and mediums. Here he is pictured in his studio in New haven, CT. (Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Titus Kaphar, ’01 B.F.A., is a painter and sculptor who addresses the lack of representation of people of color in the history of Western art by appropriating Western art’s styles and mediums. Here he is pictured in his studio in New haven, CT. (Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1749

SAN JOSE, CA – The MacArthur Foundation announced its 2018 MacArthur Fellows October 4, with San Jose State University Alumnus Titus Kaphar, ’01 B.F.A., among this year’s recipients of the “genius” award. Kaphar is an artist whose paintings, sculptures and installations explore the intersection of art, history and civic agency.

“I make paintings that people perceive often as being very social or political, but for the most part they are very personal. Everything stems from my relationship to a situation, to a narrative, to a story.”

“I make paintings that people perceive often as being very social or political, but for the most part they are very personal,” he said. “Everything stems from my relationship to a situation, to a narrative, to a story.”

This is especially on display in the work he calls the Jerome Project, inspired by his father. His father, whose first name is Jerome, was in and out of jail.  At one point Kaphar searched for his father’s name online. He found his father’s mug shot, along with police photos of 97 men with the same first and last name. He began to paint the images to look like small devotionals that he then partially covered with tar.

Much of Kaphar’s work highlights the lack of representation of people of color in the canon of Western Art with works that deconstruct the literal and visual structure of the artwork. His canvases often have top layers cut away to reveal hidden images underneath. He recalled that during his time as a university student he had one art history book that had a chapter focused on black people or people of color.

“These characters are often enslaved, in servitude, or impoverished,” he said. “So it drew me to wanting to understand how this all came about in representing black people.”

Titus Kaphar displays some of his work in his New Haven, Connecticut studio.(Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Titus Kaphar displays some of his work in his New Haven, Connecticut studio. (Photo by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Kaphar’s work has been exhibited at MoMA PS1, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia), the Seattle Art Museum, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, and Princeton University, among other venues; and he is represented in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Pérez Art Museum Miami, and the Equal Justice Initiative Museum in Montgomery, Alabama, among other public collections.

In addition to his artwork and installations, Kaphar is the founder and president of NXTHVN, pronounced Next Haven. The nonprofit is creating an artist community that will provide mentorship, studio practice and professional development opportunities for recent art school graduates.

“They get a year to engage in professional art,” he said. “I was in my mid-20s when I found art so I want to help other young folks who come from the communities I came from discover their passion and what motivates them.”

Kaphar is one of 25 Fellows selected for exceptional creativity, promise for important future advances based on past accomplishments and potential for the fellowship to facilitate subsequent creative work.

“Working in diverse fields, from the arts and sciences to public health and civil liberties, these 25 MacArthur Fellows are solving long-standing scientific and mathematical problems, pushing art forms into new and emerging territories, and addressing the urgent needs of under-resourced communities,” said Cecilia Conrad, Managing Director, MacArthur Fellows Program. “Their exceptional creativity inspires hope in us all.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Presents Words to Action: Landmarks and Legacy of Athlete Activism

 

This October is the 50th anniversary of a historic moment in athlete activism and San Jose State University history. During the 1968 Olympic Games, Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, raised their fists on the medal stand in Mexico City to protest racial inequality, drawing international attention to athlete activism and the core goals of the Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR).

Join us for our town hall, Words to Action: Landmarks and Legacy of Athlete Activism, on October 17. We have an exciting lineup of panelists who will reflect on OPHR’s 50-year legacy and its connection to the current wave of athlete activism.

Date:

October 17, 2018
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Location:

The Event Center at SJSU
290 S. 7th St., San Jose, CA 95112 (parking)

Panelists:

  • Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, former basketball player, Denver Nuggets, Sacramento Kings and the Vancouver Grizzlies
  • Nate Boyer, former active duty Green Beret and professional football player with the Seattle Seahawks
  • Howard Bryant, author and senior writer, ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com
  • John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, Olympic medalist and OPHR member
  • Harry Edwards, ’64 Sociology, ’16 Honorary Doctorate, OPHR and ISSSSC founder
  • Spencer Haywood, former basketball player and Olympic gold medalist
  • Paul Hoffman, coxswain, U.S. Olympic rowing team for the 1968 Olympics
  • Cleve Livingston, member, U.S. Olympic rowing team for the 1968 Olympics
  • Bill Rhoden, author and former Peabody-award winning sports columnist, writer-at-large for ESPN’s The Undefeated
  • Kenneth Shropshire, Adidas Distinguished Professor of Global Sport and CEO of the Global Sport Institute at Arizona State University
  • Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, Olympic gold medalist and world record setter
  • Toni Smith-Thompson, former college athlete and activist, advocacy department organizer, New York Civil Liberties Union
  • Marc Spears, ’95 Journalism, senior writer for ESPN’s The Undefeated
  • Damion Thomas, author and curator of sports at the National Museum of African American History and Culture
  • Wyomia Tyus, Olympic gold medalist
  • Steve Wyche, reporter, NFL Network

Agenda:

8 a.m. Media registration

8:30 a.m. Program begins

Introduction

Paul Lanning, CEO, Tower Foundation of SJSU

Welcome

Mary A. Papazian, President, SJSU

SJSU Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change

Ted Butryn, ISSSSC Interim Director

Panel 1: The Voices of 1968

Olympians who both experienced and actively participated in the events of Mexico City in 1968 share their stories and the repercussions of their actions when they returned home.

Moderator:

  • Kenneth Shropshire

Panelists:

  • John Carlos
  • Spencer Haywood
  • Paul Hoffman
  • Cleve Livingston
  • Tommie Smith
  • Wyomia Tyus

Break

Panel 2: Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Athlete Activism in an Era of Growth

In the 1980s and 90s, athletes gained economic and social capital, but were less likely to engage in athlete activism. Athlete-activists and scholars discuss those who came forward to stand for social justice issues.

Moderator:

  • Bill Rhoden

Panelists:

  • Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf
  • C. Keith Harrison
  • Toni Smith-Thompson
  • Damion Thomas

Panel 3 – The Kaepernick Era

What is the social impact of today’s activism by professional, college and high school athletes against police brutality and social injustices, and the larger trend against the “shut up and dribble” sentiment? Panelists discuss how a 50-year history has led to a new wave of activism.

Moderator:

  • Maureen Smith

Panelists:

  • Nate Boyer
  • Jules Boykoff
  • Howard Bryant
  • Marc Spears
  • Steve Wyche

Concluding Remarks: The Arc of Athlete Activism

Harry Edwards lends perspective and insight on the waves of athlete activism to date, from the earliest pioneers to the voices of today, and provides his thoughts on the power of protest and what we can expect to see next in the politically charged era in which we find ourselves today.

Press opportunity immediately follows

Media:

Members of the media should RSVP now to:

Robin McElhatton
robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu,
408-924-1749

Professional video and photography will be available upon request.

Tickets

Tickets for students, faculty, staff and the public are available online.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study—offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

 

Cal-Bridge Grant Readies SJSU Undergrads to Apply for PhDs in Physics and Astronomy

Students, faculty and administrators for the Cal-Bridge North program pose for a photo. Cal-Bridge scholars prepare to apply for PhD programs in physics and astronomy.

Students, faculty and administrators for the Cal-Bridge North program pose for a photo. Cal-Bridge scholars prepare to apply for PhD programs in physics and astronomy.

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA– San Jose State University joins a consortium of 15 California State University (CSU) and nine University of California (UC) campuses collectively awarded a five-year, $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to dramatically increase diversity within the fields of physics and astronomy through the Cal-Bridge program.

The Cal-Bridge program launched four years ago. It creates a pathway for underrepresented minority students from multiple CSU campuses to gain the experience needed to apply for doctoral programs in physics and astronomy at UC campuses across California. Currently, students from underrepresented minority groups represent 30 percent of the U.S. population, but represent less than 4 percent of physics and astronomy PhDs recipients nationwide. The national average of underrepresented minorities, or URM students, earning a PhD in these fields is about 80 per year.

“Cal-Bridge has already shown spectacular results in its first phase in Southern California, with a 95 percent admission rate for CSU undergraduates into doctoral programs,” said Aaron Romanowsky, an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at SJSU and co-director of the Cal-Bridge North Leadership Council. “Now with the expansion of the program into Northern California, and into physics as well as astronomy, we are excited to begin seeing even more access enabled for CSU students going into advanced STEM education and careers.”

Expanding into Northern California

The recent grant allows Cal-Bridge to expand from about a dozen scholars per year to as many as 50 statewide, with the addition of students from SJSU, San Francisco State, CSU East Bay and CSU Sacramento. SJSU is serving as a lead institution for Cal-Bridge North, with the support of Romanowsky and College of Science Dean Michael Kaufman, former chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. SJSU students Jean Donet and Javier Bustamante joined the first cohort of Cal-Bridge North. Participating Cal-Bridge Scholars receive a full scholarship for the final two years of their undergraduate degree, based on demonstrated need; a year of scholarship funding to cover the first year of graduate school at a participating UC campus; mentoring from faculty members at both CSU and UC campuses; professional development opportunities and research opportunities.

Cal-Bridge is led by Principal Investigator and Director Alexander Rudolph, a Cal Poly Pomona professor of physics and astronomy. Cal-Bridge Scholars are recruited from the 15 CSU campuses and more than 30 community colleges in the Cal-Bridge network, with the help of local faculty and staff liaisons at each campus.

Success for Early Cohorts

The program has been highly successful in its first five years in developing a pipeline of highly diverse, qualified scholars, many of whom have already successfully matriculated to a PhD program in physics or astronomy. The program just selected its fifth cohort of 27 scholars from 10 different CSU campuses across the state, bringing the total number of scholars to 61 in five cohorts, including 35 Latinos, seven African-Americans and 27 women (16 of the 27 women are from underrepresented minority groups).

In the last three years, 19 of 21 Cal-Bridge Scholars who have earned their bachelor’s degree in physics have begun or will attend PhD programs in physics or astronomy at top programs nationally, including UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, Harvard University, Northwestern University, the University of Maryland, Michigan State University and Penn State University.

Learn more about Cal-Bridge and watch a video about the program online.

CAL-BRIDGE CONTACT

Alexander Rudolph

Director, Cal-Bridge

Professor of Physics and Astronomy

Cal Poly Pomona

Email: alrudolph@cpp.edu

Cell Phone: 909-717-1851

LOCAL CONTACT

Aaron Romanowsky

Co-Director, Cal-Bridge North Leadership Council

Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy

San Jose State University

Email: aaron.romanowsky@sjsu.edu

About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

PayScale Ranks SJSU Education Majors #6 in the Nation for Salary Potential

Graduates from the Connie L. Lurie College of Education line up outside the Event Center for Commencement in spring 2018. (Photo: Brandon Chew)

Graduates from the Connie L. Lurie College of Education line up outside the Event Center for Commencement in spring 2018. (Photo: Brandon Chew)

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – Payscale, an online platform that analyzes salaries, listed San Jose State University as the sixth best school in the nation for education majors for salary potential. The company released its College Salary Report for 2018 on September 25. The report found that SJSU graduates with a bachelor’s degree in education had an early-career pay rate of $45,500 and a mid-career pay rate of $75,300. The list includes more than 380 nonprofit and public universities that offer undergraduate degrees in education.

In spring 2018, SJSU recognized 300 newly credentialed teachers and conferred 14 doctoral degrees in educational leadership.

“We are immensely proud of the talented and dedicated educators that graduate from SJSU,” said Dean Heather Lattimer, of the Connie L. Lurie College of Education. “They are having a significant impact as classroom teachers, counselors, and school leaders working to strengthen educational outcomes and close opportunity gaps. It is rewarding to have our college recognized as #6 in the nation for salary potential for education majors.”

Assistant Professor Ellen Middaugh interacts with students in her Sweeney Hall classroom on September 26, 2018. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

Assistant Professor Ellen Middaugh interacts with students in her Sweeney Hall classroom on September 26, 2018. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

The university ranked #28 overall out of 600 public universities in the nation, with early-career pay rates of $61,300 and mid-career pay rates of $112,400. Of those Spartan alumni who participated in the survey, 54 percent of respondents also said they felt their work makes the world a better place.

PayScale is a software company that uses big data and algorithms to help companies make compensation decisions while also providing information to employees about their industries salary trends.

Recent Rankings

In addition to this week’s announcement from PayScale, MONEY Magazine recently named SJSU as the fourth most transformative universities for students while U.S. News & World Report ranked it fifth among the West’s top public universities offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Diverse Issues in Higher Education also ranked SJSU among the nation’s top universities for granting degrees to minority students.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

Alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos to Receive the San Jose State University Tower Award

Media Contact:
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos have been named this year’s recipients of the university’s highest honor, the Tower Award. Smith and Carlos will receive the award at San Jose State’s annual Inspiration to Innovation gala, a fundraiser to be held October 18 at the Event Center at SJSU.

“San Jose State University alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos felt the fate of the nation resting on their shoulders when they made their unforgettable statement in support of human rights and dignity,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “As SJSU marks the 50th anniversary of their courageous act, we seek to recognize these alumni for risking everything to bring worldwide attention to the defining issue of their time, one that still resonates today.”

Smith and Carlos were SJSU track and field team members when they qualified to compete in the 1968 Olympics, held in Mexico City. After earning gold and bronze medals, respectively, they chose to bow their heads and raise gloved fists on the medal stand while the national anthem was played. In doing so, they created their iconic moment in athlete activism during one of the most tumultuous times in modern U.S. history.

From athletes to activists

“The Tower Award is given to San Jose State University exemplars whose personal stories embody the grit and determination that make us Spartans,” said Paul Lanning, vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation. “Without saying one word, alumni Tommie Smith and John Carlos sent a message that reverberated from 1968 through today, and for this they will receive the 2018 Tower Award at SJSU’s annual Inspiration to Innovation gala.”

For what the International Olympic Committee reportedly described as an “outrageous stance,” Smith and Carlos were evicted from the Olympic Village in Mexico City and sent back to the United States. Nearly 40 years later, SJSU student Erik Grotz, who was surprised to learn that Smith and Carlos were alumni, suggested that the campus memorialize their peaceful protest. In 2005, the Associated Students of SJSU unveiled, in the heart of campus, a 23-foot-tall landmark sculpture of the two athletes.

Today, visitors from around the world act on the sculpture’s signature invitation to take a stand by posing in the silver medal position where Australian Olympian Peter Norman stood in 1968, an arrangement discussed with and approved by Norman before his death in 2006.

San Jose’s Speed City era

Between 1941 and 1970, 91 Spartans were ranked in the top 10 worldwide by Track and Field News, 27 were Olympians, and men’s track and field won the NCAA team title in 1969. Smith and Carlos were SJSU track and field team members during this time, when San Jose was known as Speed City, with the legendary Lloyd “Bud” Winter as head coach.

Raised in Texas and California, Tommie Smith, ’69 Social Science, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, coached track and field at Oberlin College, where he also taught sociology, and later at Santa Monica College. He is the author of Silent Gesture: The Autobiography of Tommie Smith.

A native of New York, John Carlos, ’05 Honorary Doctorate, pursued professional football and later worked for the United States Olympic Committee. He is the author, with Dave Zirin, of The John Carlos Story: The Sports Moment That Changed the World, this year’s Campus Reading Program selection.

Continuing the dialogue

SJSU is the birthplace of the Olympic Project for Human Rights, a movement led by SJSU alumnus and instructor Harry Edwards, who went on to become a world-renown sports sociologist. The project inspired Smith and Carlos’ now-historic stand.

Edwards, Smith, Carlos and others founded the SJSU Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change in 2017. The institute seeks to continue the dialogue about athlete activism and the influence of sport in effecting positive social change.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties to Receive 2018 Community Partner Award at SJSU’s Inspiration to Innovation Gala

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University is pleased to announce that Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties will be the recipient of the 2018 Community Partner Award in recognition of its support to Spartans as they seek to positively impact the campus, region and world. Over the past two years, Second Harvest has provided $430,000 in groceries to thousands of SJSU students.

San Jose State and Second Harvest are preparing to open SJSU’s first permanent food pantry. The Spartan Food Pantry will look and operate much like a neighborhood market with one major difference: Everything inside will be offered at no cost to all eligible students.

“When San Jose State University learned that approximately half of our students are skipping meals to make ends meet, we knew we had to do something big,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “SJSU would like to thank Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties for working with us every step of the way as we prepare to open the Spartan Food Pantry, which will ensure our students have what they need to prepare nutritious meals while completing their studies.”

Second Harvest will receive the award at San Jose State’s annual Inspiration to Innovation gala, a fundraiser to be held October 18 at The Event Center at SJSU. This year’s gala will focus on eliminating food insecurity among SJSU students.

Sponsors include Cisco Systems, Edgeman Coaching LLC, Executive Edge of Silicon Valley, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, the Iwata Family Foundation, Arthur Lund and Agnieszka Winkler, Constance Moore and Roger Greer, Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp, San Francisco 49ers, Sphere 3D, and Zenefits.

The foundation of a healthy, productive life

“Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties is honored to receive the 2018 Community Partner Award from San Jose State University,” Second Harvest CEO Leslie Bacho said. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to expand our services and to provide vital support to SJSU students because nutritious food is the foundation of a healthy, productive life.”

The gala will be held one day after the SJSU Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change’s town hall focusing on the 50th anniversary of the moment students Tommie Smith and John Carlos took a stand for human rights at the 1968 Olympics.

“The town hall and gala will celebrate the role the San Jose State University community has played in seeking innovative approaches to social justice issues,” said Paul Lanning, vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation of SJSU. “Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties’ commitment to supporting SJSU as we prepare to open the university’s first permanent food pantry is yet another example of the innovative work under way here.”

Many food banks were born of efforts to eliminate poverty and racial injustice during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. The Food Bank, Inc. of Santa Clara County was formed in 1974, and incorporated as a non-profit agency in 1979. In 1988, the San Mateo County Food Bank merged with The Food Bank, Inc. of Santa Clara County to become Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties.

A modern grocery store, with one major difference

The Spartan Food Pantry will be located inside the newly renovated and expanded Diaz Compean Student Union, a central location near many student services. The 1,000-square-foot space will offer fresh produce, fresh and frozen meats, milk, bread, canned goods, personal hygiene products and more arranged in coolers, freezers and shelving much like modern grocery stores. The doors are slated to open this academic year.

San Jose State wishes to express its gratitude to the California State University Chancellor’s Office and supporters of Senate Bill 85, through which SJSU will receive $130,000 to ensure students have access to the basics they need to persist and earn their degrees.

“The time has come for a permanent food pantry at San Jose State University, and we could not have asked for a better partner than Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties,” Vice President for Student Affairs Patrick Day said. “On behalf of the entire SJSU community, including those who have been working hard for years to address this basic human need, I would like to thank everyone at Second Harvest Food Bank.”

A community committed to ending food insecurity

San Jose State began addressing food insecurity in 2008 by distributing $10 gift cards redeemable at campus eateries. A committee of faculty, staff, administrators and students has been meeting ever since to formalize efforts, including studies and solutions such as the Associated Students of SJSU Community Garden, an @SJSUFreeFood Twitter handle, and small food shelves in various departmental offices throughout campus.

San Jose State and Second Harvest Food Bank began working together in 2015, when Second Harvest helped train SJSU officials on CalFresh registration for students. In October 2016, SJSU and Second Harvest introduced the Just In Time Mobile Food Pantry, offering fresh produce, refrigerated and frozen groceries, and high-quality, shelf-stable foods on a monthly basis at no cost to eligible students.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

Plans Approved for San Jose State University’s Interdisciplinary Science Building

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings.

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings.

SJSU Media Relations:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA –
San Jose State University received final approval today from the California State University Board of Trustees for plans to build an eight-story, 161,200-square-foot, $181 million Interdisciplinary Science Building.

“On behalf of San Jose State University, I would like to thank the California State University Board of Trustees for approving our Interdisciplinary Science Building and supporting our efforts to bring our students a new cutting-edge academic research and teaching building befitting SJSU’s location in the heart of Silicon Valley,” President Mary A. Papazian said.

The Interdisciplinary Science Building will be financed with CSU Systemwide Revenue Bonds, campus designated capital reserves, auxiliary reserves, and continuing education reserves.

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings. The current Science Building was completed in 1957 and Duncan Hall in 1967, making the ISB the first new science building in more than a half century.

Construction is slated to begin in 2019, and anticipated to be completed in 2021. The collaborative design/build contractor is McCarthy Building Companies, Inc. The project architect is FLAD Architects

Supporting collaboration and partnerships

The project primarily will serve San Jose State’s College of Science, which currently enrolls more than 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students in programs for biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics and statistics, meteorology and climate science, physics and astronomy, and science education. The college also administers the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

ISB building

The eight-story, 161,200-square-foot structure will contain chemistry and biology labs and more.

“San Jose State University’s new Interdisciplinary Science Building will provide essential teaching, research and collaboration space for our STEM students, extending learning beyond the classroom. In addition, the building will enhance our growing partnerships with industry leaders in Silicon Valley,” Dean Michael Kaufman said.

  • Features will including the following:
    Biology and chemistry teaching and research labs, collaboration space, 41 faculty offices, and administrative and support areas.
  • A mentoring hub on each floor where students will work on interdisciplinary projects, connect with faculty, and meet with industry partners.
  • A collaborative core in hallways between classrooms and research labs that will allow student and faculty researchers to brainstorm and plan their projects.
  • A high-performance computing suite for astronomers, physicists, social scientists, health professionals and more, where students and faculty from different disciplines can share their work and improve their research techniques.

Designed to meet or exceed environmental standards

“San Jose State University’s Interdisciplinary Science Building will be forward-looking—to the future of education and of Silicon Valley,” Vice President for Administration and Finance Charlie Faas said. “The proposed approach enables the campus to best use its limited land base to increase campus density to accommodate the academic program.”

This project will be designed to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver and target LEED Gold in order to meet the sustainability objectives of the campus by using an efficient building envelope that will reduce heating and cooling demand.

Other sustainable design features will include efficient LED lighting systems, a cool roof, and the use of recycled water in restrooms and for landscape irrigation.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

U.S. News Rankings: SJSU Fifth Overall Among Best Regional Public Universities in the West

Campus gateway. Photo: David Schmitz

Photo: David Schmitz

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University continues to excel in the U.S. News & World Report annual college rankings, as reflected in the 2019 edition available now online.

  • San Jose State ranks fifth among the West’s top public universities offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees.
  • San Jose State ranks seventh among the West’s top public universities for best value.
  • San Jose State ranks fifth among universities in the West for ethnic diversity.
  • San Jose State ranks 18th for best colleges for veterans.

“These rankings confirm San Jose State University is among Silicon Valley’s most important assets,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “San Jose State sends 10,000 graduates into the workforce annually, providing all students with the opportunity to obtain an excellent education at an affordable price in the heart of the world’s most dynamic economic engine.”

Engineering

San Jose State’s Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering received top marks, ranking third in the nation among public engineering programs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, excluding service academies.

“We are honored to be recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top engineering programs in the nation,” Dean Sheryl Ehrman said. “We are the program of choice for our incoming freshmen and transfer students, who benefit from our hands-on curriculum and dedicated faculty. Our graduates go on to do great things in Silicon Valley and beyond.”

Business

In addition, SJSU’s Lucas College and Graduate School of Business was ranked third in the Bay Area among accredited business bachelor’s and master’s degree programs.

“We’re delighted to be recognized for robust undergraduate programs that help students develop organizationally-valued competencies,” Dean Dan Moshavi said. “By emphasizing experiential education and professional readiness, we enable our students to become key contributors in the Silicon Valley and beyond.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

Diversity Rankings: SJSU Among the Nation’s Top Universities for Granting Degrees to Minority Students

Photo: David Schmitz

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University is among the nation’s top universities for granting degrees to minority students, according to the publication Diverse Issues in Higher Education.

“San Jose State University is proud of its role in providing all students with the opportunity to earn a college degree,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “SJSU is among Silicon Valley’s greatest educational assets, sending more than 9,000 graduates annually into the workforce and on to advanced degrees.”

The August 2018 issue of Diverse Issues provides the following details on San Jose State’s national rankings in terms of number of degrees granted in 2016-17 in comparison to other institutions:

  • Sixth for bachelor’s degrees awarded to Asian American students
  • 31st for bachelor’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students
  • 14th for bachelor’s degrees awarded to minority students
  • Eighth for master’s degrees awarded to Asian American students
  • 32nd for master’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students
  • 24th for master’s degrees awarded to minority students

The recognition comes on the heels of MONEY magazine’s ranking of San Jose State as the fourth most transformative university in the nation.

Supporting All Students

Studying national figures, Diverse Issues found that the total number of degrees awarded to minority students increased two percent over the previous year. However, “minorities as a group are still underrepresented relative to their share in the U.S. population,” the magazine said.

San Jose State University data shows 73 percent of bachelor’s degrees and 66 percent of graduate degrees were awarded in 2016-17 to students who identified as Native American, Black, Asian, Asian American, Pacific Islander or Hispanic, including those who specified two or more races.

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 58 percent of San Jose residents identify as a member of one of these groups, other races, or two or more races. (The SJSU and U.S. Census figures incorporate international students under the ethnicities they report, and the SJSU graduate data encompasses master’s and doctoral degrees.)

The data source for the Diverse Issues analysis is the Collections Survey of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collected by U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

MONEY Rankings: SJSU is Fourth Most Transformative College

The Diaz-Compean Student Union is a student life center (Photo: Christina Olivas).

The Diaz-Compean Student Union is a student life center (Photo: Christina Olivas).

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University is pleased to announce that it has been ranked fourth in the nation on MONEY magazine’s list of most transformative colleges.

“San Jose State University takes great pride in providing our students and their families with life-changing opportunities through higher education,” President Mary A. Papazian said.

San Jose State is the only four-year public comprehensive university to place in the top five. MONEY estimates average SJSU student debt at $15,000 and early career earnings at $58,500 annually, resulting in an earnings premium over peers of $12,100.

Exceeding expectations

“It’s not surprising that elite schools report high graduation rates or alumni success.” MONEY said. “What’s impressive is when a college helps students do far better than would be expected from their academic and economic backgrounds. We call this a college’s value add.”

In addition, MONEY ranked San Jose State 61st in the nation on its list of 727 best colleges for your money. SJSU received this ranking because its alumni earn high salaries after accruing little student debt.

“College is a great investment—if you choose the right school. MONEY analyzed graduation rates, tuition charges, family borrowing, and alumni earnings (plus 22 other data points) to find the country’s top values,” MONEY said.

An Affordable Price

The publication estimates 93 percent of San Jose State students who need aid receive grants averaging $14,000 annually to cover estimated costs of $28,800 annually.

“San Jose State University offers an excellent education at an affordable price,” President Papazian said. “This is why an increasing number of students are choosing SJSU as the place where they would like to prepare for a lifetime of meaningful contributions to our world.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

President Papazian to Deliver 2018 Fall Welcome Address

 

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – President Mary A. Papazian will deliver the Fall Welcome Address at noon Aug. 20 in the Diaz Compean Student Union Ballroom.

The president will highlight significant developments including the following:

  • Record enrollment of 35,000 regular and special session students, and the appointment of 65 new tenure-track faculty members.
  • An emphasis on student success, research, innovation and graduate programs.
  • The spring 2019 completion of the Spartan Recreation and Aquatic Center, and plans for an Interdisciplinary Science Building and a 1,600-bed residence hall.
  • The establishment of a permanent campus food pantry with Second Harvest Food Bank.
  • A commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the moment Spartans John Carlos and Tommie Smith took a stand for human rights at the 1968 Olympics.

All students, faculty, staff, community members and the news media are invited to attend this event. The address will be streamed live. Classes begin Aug. 21.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Receives 2018 CASE Educational Fundraising Award

gala brochure (Photo: David Schmitz)

SJSU’s fundraising program includes an annual gala (Photo: David Schmitz).

Media Relations contacts:
Pat Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University has received a 2018 Educational Fundraising Award from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). The honor is given each year to superior fundraising programs at educational institutions across the country.

“San Jose State’s strong fundraising efforts help ensure our students’ success and their contributions to Silicon Valley and California’s economy,” President Mary A. Papazian said.

SJSU is one of just five public comprehensive institutions nationwide with endowments over $35 million being honored for overall performance.

The award was based on the judges’ analysis of three years of SJSU’s fundraising data submitted to the annual Voluntary Support of Education survey.

According to CASE, SJSU has “demonstrated the highest levels of professionalism and best practice in its fundraising efforts” and “contributed to the betterment of educational advancement worldwide.”

“This is an exciting affirmation that we are on the right track in building a consistent pipeline of private support,” said Paul Lanning, vice president of University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation.

SJSU is among an exceptional group of 90 colleges, universities and independent schools receiving this year’s award.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Establishes Scholarship Fund Endowed by Alumna, Lawyer and Political Advisor Nancy McFadden

Nancy McFadden (Photo: Bob Bain)

Nancy McFadden (Photo: Robert Bain)

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University is pleased to announce the establishment of the Mary E. McFadden Nursing Scholarship Fund, made possible by a $230,000 gift from the estate of the late Nancy E. McFadden, a San Jose State alumna and former chief of staff to Governor Jerry Brown.

“Both Mary and Nancy McFadden were exemplary members of the San Jose State University Spartan community,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “They leveraged their educations to serve their families and communities while pursuing professional endeavors that made a real difference for our region, state and nation.”

Single mother Mary McFadden raised her children, Nancy and Bill, while working nights as a registered nurse at the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara hospital. Nancy completed degrees at San Jose State University and the University of Virginia School of Law before beginning a career in public service that included the Clinton administration in Washington, D.C., and the Davis and Brown administrations in Sacramento.

“San Jose State University’s College of Health and Human Sciences, through The Valley Foundation School of Nursing, is honored to be entrusted with the preservation of Mary and Nancy McFaddens’ SJSU legacy,” said Dean Mary Schutten. “Like Mary and Nancy McFadden, our nursing students seek to make an impact on their families and communities, and will benefit tremendously from this support.”

A Permanent Endowment

In accordance with the gift agreement, the McFadden gift will fund a permanent endowment to provide scholarships for students with demonstrated financial need who are enrolled in San Jose State’s nursing program. The scholarship will be awarded annually to one or more students, thereby making a significant impact on their educations.

“On behalf of the Tower Foundation of SJSU, I would like to thank the trustees of the Nancy McFadden estate for choosing to honor Nancy and Mary McFadden by creating an endowment to benefit students following in their footsteps,” said Vice President for University Advancement and Tower Foundation CEO Paul Lanning. “The foundation is honored to serve as the steward of these funds.”

A Commitment to Nursing

Nancy Elizabeth McFadden was born in Wilmington, Delaware, the eldest child of William McFadden and the former Mary Adams. The couple divorced when Nancy was a child, and Nancy moved with her mother and brother to San Jose.

Mary McFadden worked as a night nurse at Kaiser Santa Clara so that she could be available to her children, seeing them off to school in the morning and helping them after school through the early evening. Mary later became the night supervisor for the entire facility, and was beloved by her colleagues for her intelligence, sense of humor and practical nature. She worked until she was afflicted by a series of small strokes, passing away in 2000.

“Nancy had the highest respect for nurses and believed that nursing is a special calling. It was her fervent desire that students who need assistance to become nurses be given a helping hand to achieve their professional dreams,” wrote the trustees for Nancy McFadden’s estate.

“Best chief of staff”

Nancy McFadden attended San Jose State, where she was elected student body president and graduated with a bachelor’s in political science in 1984. After earning her law degree, she devoted most of her career to public service. She was deputy political director for the Clinton campaign; deputy associate attorney general under Janet Reno; general counsel to the U.S. Department of Transportation; and deputy chief of staff for Vice President Al Gore. After returning to California, McFadden served as senior advisor to Governor Gray Davis and chief of staff to Governor Jerry Brown.

McFadden counted among her greatest achievements spearheading a successful effort to extend the state’s extensive cap-and-trade program, setting a statewide limit on greenhouse-gas emissions. Her willingness to work for months and months behind the scenes to get things done was especially appreciated. Nancy McFadden died of ovarian cancer in March 2018 at age 59.

“Nancy was the best chief of staff a governor could ever ask for,” Governor Brown said. “She understood government and politics, she could manage, she was a diplomat and she was fearless. She could also write like no other. Nancy loved her job and we loved her doing it. This is truly a loss for me, for Anne, for our office, for Nancy’s family and close friends – and for all of California.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Celebrates the Class of 2018 at Commencement May 23-25

Photo: David Schmitz

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University is taking a new approach to commencement: For the first time, SJSU will hold seven ceremonies (one per college) to provide each of this year’s more than 10,000 graduates the opportunity to be called by name and individually recognized as he or she crosses the stage.

“Commencement is the culmination of an entire set of aspirations and dreams for students who took the hard road to seek transformational opportunities for themselves and their communities,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “This ceremony, steeped in academic tradition, respectfully honors and celebrates our graduates with the faculty, family and friends who have been part of their journey.”

The ceremonies will be held over a three-day period beginning May 23 at Avaya Stadium and the Event Center at SJSU. All will be streamed live on the SJSU website, where a schedule of the ceremonies has been posted.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

The Class of 2018

The Class of 2018 reflects San Jose State and the California State University’s defining characteristics: opportunity, quality and success.

  • SJSU sends more college graduates into the Silicon Valley workforce than any other institution. This includes business, engineering and science graduates, in addition to education, social sciences, arts and humanities and applied sciences and arts degree holders.
  • An estimated one-third of SJSU students are the first in their families to attend college. Carlos Alberto Sanchez earned two degrees at SJSU, where he now teaches. The son of Mexican farmworkers, he is the 2018 President’s Scholar. He will be honored at the Social Sciences commencement ceremony.
  • SJSU has long produced the region’s teachers and nurses. SJSU will recognize 300 newly credentialed teachers and 449 new social workers, nurses, occupational therapists and other healthcare professionals at commencement.
  • SJSU will grant 36 doctoral degrees, including 22 doctoral degrees of nursing practice and 14 doctoral degrees of educational leadership to future university faculty members as well as educators and clinicians seeking professional development.
  • Students eligible for participation in the May 2018 commencement ceremonies have completed or will complete their studies in summer 2017, fall 2017, spring 2018 and summer 2018.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

Individual honors

Artemio Posadas, a celebrated musician, dancer and teacher of traditional Mexican music, will receive an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters at the Humanities and the Arts ceremony.

In addition, three outstanding graduates will be honored at this year’s commencement ceremonies.

  • Emily Moffitt will receive a master’s in environmental studies and the 2018 Outstanding Thesis Award at the Social Sciences ceremony. Her findings will help preserve Pacific-Slope Flycatcher bird habitats.
  • Two students will each receive the 2018 Outstanding Graduating Senior Award for their academic achievements, leadership roles, community work and personal achievements. Nardos Darkera will be recognized at the Applied Sciences and the Arts ceremony, where she will receive a bachelor’s in public health. Sierra Peace will be recognized at the Social Sciences ceremony, where she will receive a bachelor’s in psychology.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

New traditions

Among the very first items spectators will see at each ceremony is San Jose State’s new mace, an ornamental staff or scepter borne as a symbol of authority by the individual leading the processional of students, faculty and administrators as they enter the venue and take their seats.

A gift from the Tower Foundation of SJSU, the mace was designed and created this spring by Art and Art History Lecturer Yvonne Escalante, ’13 MFA Spatial Arts. She found inspiration for the design in both SJSU history and the paths students take to reach graduation.

This year’s venues

Avaya Stadium and the Event Center at SJSU were selected for this year’s commencement ceremonies in order to provide graduates and their loved ones with convenient and accessible venues. Avaya Stadium will host the Business, Engineering, Applied Sciences and the Arts, and Social Sciences ceremonies.

The Event Center at SJSU will offer an on-campus setting for the Education, Humanities and the Arts, and Science ceremonies. Taken together, the selection of these two venues symbolize San Jose State’s history, leadership, presence and collaborative relationship with downtown, the City of San Jose and the region.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

Joining the CSU’s 3.4 million alumni

Another highlight is the conferral of degrees, when President Papazian invites students to move their tassels from right to left. It is a powerful moment for graduates and their loved ones, and one that is replicated throughout the California State University, the nation’s largest four-year public university system, with 23 campuses and eight off-campus centers.

“As new opportunities await you, so too do new responsibilities for you are now and always part of the CSU alumni family,” Chancellor Timothy P. White said in his 2018 commencement statement. “You join a successful, impactful and generous community more than 3.4 million strong. Together, you build a better tomorrow for your neighbors, for the United States and for our world.”



About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Presents 2018 Outstanding Seniors and Thesis Awards

Media contacts:
Pat Harris, SJSU Media Relations, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University President Mary A. Papazian will recognize this year’s top graduates at commencement ceremonies to be held May 23-25 at the SJSU Event Center and Avaya Stadium. Nardos Darkera and Sierra Peace will each receive the 2018 Outstanding Graduating Senior Award for academic achievements, leadership roles, contributions to the community and personal achievements. Emily Moffitt is the recipient of the 2018 Outstanding Thesis Award in recognition of the quality of her research.

Nardos Darkera

Nardos Darkera (all photos courtesy of the students)

Nardos Darkera, ’18 Public Health, has given back to the Spartan community while maintaining a 3.85 GPA. She has represented San Jose State as a United Nations Foundation Global Health Fellow, served as a peer teaching assistant, worked as a lead peer advisor in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts Success Center, and interned with Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. Darkera is a recipient of the Louie Barozzi Scholarship for academic excellence and community service, the Dean’s International Scholarship to study abroad in Puerto Rico, and the Health Science Scholarship to attend the American Public Health Association Meeting in Atlanta. She will continue on to the University of California, San Francisco, to pursue a master’s degree in global health. Health Science Professor Kathleen Roe predicts that Darkera “will be a leader of thought, social action, professions — and maybe even politics.”

Sierra Peace

Sierra Peace

Sierra Peace, ’18 Psychology, arrived at San Jose State as a 16-year-old freshman with her sights set on medical school. A member of SJSU’s International Neuroeconomics Institute research lab since 2015, Peace has presented two posters at the Western Psychological Association Conference. She juggled four jobs while volunteering with the Third Street Community Center, the Associated Students of SJSU community garden and the Regional Medical Center of San Jose. Her 3.97 GPA qualified her for Educational Opportunity Program Honors for four years. She was also a 2016 and 2017 Dean’s Scholar, a 2017 Hoover-Langdon Scholar and a 2018 President’s Scholar. Psychology Professor Cheryl Chancellor-Freeland describes Peace as “the most exceptional student I have encountered in my 23 years of teaching.”

Emily Moffitt

Emily Moffitt

Emily Moffitt, ’17 Environmental Studies, collected feathers from 169 birds at San Jose’s Coyote Creek Field Station, and then analyzed the feathers for stable isotopes to reveal where birds spent their breeding season. Her thesis “Using Stable Isotope Analysis to Infer Breeding Latitude and Migratory Timing of Juvenile Pacific-Slope Flycatchers (Empidonax difficilis)” revealed the species’ migratory patterns, critical information for preserving habitats the birds need to survive. She partnered with the University of California, Davis, Stable Isotope Facility to develop statistical programs and used ArcGIS to portray probable breeding origins, and support her research using isotope reference and Breeding Bird Survey data.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

Influential Educator of Traditional Mexican Music and Dance Artemio Posadas to Receive Honorary Degree

Artemio Posadas (National Heritage Fellow portrait by Tom Pich)

Artemio Posadas (National Heritage Fellow portrait by Tom Pich)

Media contacts:
Pat Harris, 408-924-1748,
pat.harris@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University announced today that Artemio Posadas, a celebrated educator of traditional Mexican music and dance, will receive an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters during the College of Humanities and the Arts commencement ceremony beginning at 1:30 p.m. May 24 at the Event Center at SJSU. 

Artemio Posadas

Posadas was a 2016 National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellow. He was born in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, where he discovered son huasteco, regional music punctuated with poetic, instrumental and dance improvisation and falsetto breaks. The NEA posted excerpts of two lively numbers.

A graduate of the Universidad de San Luis Potosí, Posadas recorded regional sones with the late Beno Liberman for the Antología del Son Mexicano. In 1974, he started giving music and dance workshops in California, where he later became an American citizen. Since 1991, he has been teaching the youth at the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in Richmond, Calif.

Posadas served as a master artist through the Alliance for California Traditional Artists, and taught at the Center for Training and Careers in San Jose and in the East Bay public school system. A tremendous influence for generations, Posadas has taught musicians and dancers for 40 years.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.