Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties to Receive 2018 Community Partner Award at SJSU’s Inspiration to Innovation Gala

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University is pleased to announce that Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties will be the recipient of the 2018 Community Partner Award in recognition of its support to Spartans as they seek to positively impact the campus, region and world. Over the past two years, Second Harvest has provided $430,000 in groceries to thousands of SJSU students.

San Jose State and Second Harvest are preparing to open SJSU’s first permanent food pantry. The Spartan Food Pantry will look and operate much like a neighborhood market with one major difference: Everything inside will be offered at no cost to all eligible students.

“When San Jose State University learned that approximately half of our students are skipping meals to make ends meet, we knew we had to do something big,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “SJSU would like to thank Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties for working with us every step of the way as we prepare to open the Spartan Food Pantry, which will ensure our students have what they need to prepare nutritious meals while completing their studies.”

Second Harvest will receive the award at San Jose State’s annual Inspiration to Innovation gala, a fundraiser to be held October 18 at The Event Center at SJSU. This year’s gala will focus on eliminating food insecurity among SJSU students.

Sponsors include Cisco Systems, Edgeman Coaching LLC, Executive Edge of Silicon Valley, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, the Iwata Family Foundation, Arthur Lund and Agnieszka Winkler, Constance Moore and Roger Greer, Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp, San Francisco 49ers, Sphere 3D, and Zenefits.

The foundation of a healthy, productive life

“Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties is honored to receive the 2018 Community Partner Award from San Jose State University,” Second Harvest CEO Leslie Bacho said. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to expand our services and to provide vital support to SJSU students because nutritious food is the foundation of a healthy, productive life.”

The gala will be held one day after the SJSU Institute for the Study of Sport, Society and Social Change’s town hall focusing on the 50th anniversary of the moment students Tommie Smith and John Carlos took a stand for human rights at the 1968 Olympics.

“The town hall and gala will celebrate the role the San Jose State University community has played in seeking innovative approaches to social justice issues,” said Paul Lanning, vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation of SJSU. “Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties’ commitment to supporting SJSU as we prepare to open the university’s first permanent food pantry is yet another example of the innovative work under way here.”

Many food banks were born of efforts to eliminate poverty and racial injustice during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. The Food Bank, Inc. of Santa Clara County was formed in 1974, and incorporated as a non-profit agency in 1979. In 1988, the San Mateo County Food Bank merged with The Food Bank, Inc. of Santa Clara County to become Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties.

A modern grocery store, with one major difference

The Spartan Food Pantry will be located inside the newly renovated and expanded Diaz Compean Student Union, a central location near many student services. The 1,000-square-foot space will offer fresh produce, fresh and frozen meats, milk, bread, canned goods, personal hygiene products and more arranged in coolers, freezers and shelving much like modern grocery stores. The doors are slated to open this academic year.

San Jose State wishes to express its gratitude to the California State University Chancellor’s Office and supporters of Senate Bill 85, through which SJSU will receive $130,000 to ensure students have access to the basics they need to persist and earn their degrees.

“The time has come for a permanent food pantry at San Jose State University, and we could not have asked for a better partner than Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties,” Vice President for Student Affairs Patrick Day said. “On behalf of the entire SJSU community, including those who have been working hard for years to address this basic human need, I would like to thank everyone at Second Harvest Food Bank.”

A community committed to ending food insecurity

San Jose State began addressing food insecurity in 2008 by distributing $10 gift cards redeemable at campus eateries. A committee of faculty, staff, administrators and students has been meeting ever since to formalize efforts, including studies and solutions such as the Associated Students of SJSU Community Garden, an @SJSUFreeFood Twitter handle, and small food shelves in various departmental offices throughout campus.

San Jose State and Second Harvest Food Bank began working together in 2015, when Second Harvest helped train SJSU officials on CalFresh registration for students. In October 2016, SJSU and Second Harvest introduced the Just In Time Mobile Food Pantry, offering fresh produce, refrigerated and frozen groceries, and high-quality, shelf-stable foods on a monthly basis at no cost to eligible students.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

 

Plans Approved for San Jose State University’s Interdisciplinary Science Building

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings.

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings.

SJSU Media Relations:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA –
San Jose State University received final approval today from the California State University Board of Trustees for plans to build an eight-story, 161,200-square-foot, $181 million Interdisciplinary Science Building.

“On behalf of San Jose State University, I would like to thank the California State University Board of Trustees for approving our Interdisciplinary Science Building and supporting our efforts to bring our students a new cutting-edge academic research and teaching building befitting SJSU’s location in the heart of Silicon Valley,” President Mary A. Papazian said.

The Interdisciplinary Science Building will be financed with CSU Systemwide Revenue Bonds, campus designated capital reserves, auxiliary reserves, and continuing education reserves.

The structure will be located in the southwest quadrant of campus, near Duncan Hall, one of two existing science buildings. The current Science Building was completed in 1957 and Duncan Hall in 1967, making the ISB the first new science building in more than a half century.

Construction is slated to begin in 2019, and anticipated to be completed in 2021. The collaborative design/build contractor is McCarthy Building Companies, Inc. The project architect is FLAD Architects

Supporting collaboration and partnerships

The project primarily will serve San Jose State’s College of Science, which currently enrolls more than 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students in programs for biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics and statistics, meteorology and climate science, physics and astronomy, and science education. The college also administers the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

ISB building

The eight-story, 161,200-square-foot structure will contain chemistry and biology labs and more.

“San Jose State University’s new Interdisciplinary Science Building will provide essential teaching, research and collaboration space for our STEM students, extending learning beyond the classroom. In addition, the building will enhance our growing partnerships with industry leaders in Silicon Valley,” Dean Michael Kaufman said.

  • Features will including the following:
    Biology and chemistry teaching and research labs, collaboration space, 41 faculty offices, and administrative and support areas.
  • A mentoring hub on each floor where students will work on interdisciplinary projects, connect with faculty, and meet with industry partners.
  • A collaborative core in hallways between classrooms and research labs that will allow student and faculty researchers to brainstorm and plan their projects.
  • A high-performance computing suite for astronomers, physicists, social scientists, health professionals and more, where students and faculty from different disciplines can share their work and improve their research techniques.

Designed to meet or exceed environmental standards

“San Jose State University’s Interdisciplinary Science Building will be forward-looking—to the future of education and of Silicon Valley,” Vice President for Administration and Finance Charlie Faas said. “The proposed approach enables the campus to best use its limited land base to increase campus density to accommodate the academic program.”

This project will be designed to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver and target LEED Gold in order to meet the sustainability objectives of the campus by using an efficient building envelope that will reduce heating and cooling demand.

Other sustainable design features will include efficient LED lighting systems, a cool roof, and the use of recycled water in restrooms and for landscape irrigation.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

U.S. News Rankings: SJSU Fifth Overall Among Best Regional Public Universities in the West

Campus gateway. Photo: David Schmitz

Photo: David Schmitz

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University continues to excel in the U.S. News & World Report annual college rankings, as reflected in the 2019 edition available now online.

  • San Jose State ranks fifth among the West’s top public universities offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees.
  • San Jose State ranks seventh among the West’s top public universities for best value.
  • San Jose State ranks fifth among universities in the West for ethnic diversity.
  • San Jose State ranks 18th for best colleges for veterans.

“These rankings confirm San Jose State University is among Silicon Valley’s most important assets,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “San Jose State sends 10,000 graduates into the workforce annually, providing all students with the opportunity to obtain an excellent education at an affordable price in the heart of the world’s most dynamic economic engine.”

Engineering

San Jose State’s Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering received top marks, ranking third in the nation among public engineering programs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, excluding service academies.

“We are honored to be recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top engineering programs in the nation,” Dean Sheryl Ehrman said. “We are the program of choice for our incoming freshmen and transfer students, who benefit from our hands-on curriculum and dedicated faculty. Our graduates go on to do great things in Silicon Valley and beyond.”

Business

In addition, SJSU’s Lucas College and Graduate School of Business was ranked third in the Bay Area among accredited business bachelor’s and master’s degree programs.

“We’re delighted to be recognized for robust undergraduate programs that help students develop organizationally-valued competencies,” Dean Dan Moshavi said. “By emphasizing experiential education and professional readiness, we enable our students to become key contributors in the Silicon Valley and beyond.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

Diversity Rankings: SJSU Among the Nation’s Top Universities for Granting Degrees to Minority Students

Photo: David Schmitz

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University is among the nation’s top universities for granting degrees to minority students, according to the publication Diverse Issues in Higher Education.

“San Jose State University is proud of its role in providing all students with the opportunity to earn a college degree,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “SJSU is among Silicon Valley’s greatest educational assets, sending more than 9,000 graduates annually into the workforce and on to advanced degrees.”

The August 2018 issue of Diverse Issues provides the following details on San Jose State’s national rankings in terms of number of degrees granted in 2016-17 in comparison to other institutions:

  • Sixth for bachelor’s degrees awarded to Asian American students
  • 31st for bachelor’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students
  • 14th for bachelor’s degrees awarded to minority students
  • Eighth for master’s degrees awarded to Asian American students
  • 32nd for master’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students
  • 24th for master’s degrees awarded to minority students

The recognition comes on the heels of MONEY magazine’s ranking of San Jose State as the fourth most transformative university in the nation.

Supporting All Students

Studying national figures, Diverse Issues found that the total number of degrees awarded to minority students increased two percent over the previous year. However, “minorities as a group are still underrepresented relative to their share in the U.S. population,” the magazine said.

San Jose State University data shows 73 percent of bachelor’s degrees and 66 percent of graduate degrees were awarded in 2016-17 to students who identified as Native American, Black, Asian, Asian American, Pacific Islander or Hispanic, including those who specified two or more races.

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 58 percent of San Jose residents identify as a member of one of these groups, other races, or two or more races. (The SJSU and U.S. Census figures incorporate international students under the ethnicities they report, and the SJSU graduate data encompasses master’s and doctoral degrees.)

The data source for the Diverse Issues analysis is the Collections Survey of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collected by U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

MONEY Rankings: SJSU is Fourth Most Transformative College

The Diaz-Compean Student Union is a student life center (Photo: Christina Olivas).

The Diaz-Compean Student Union is a student life center (Photo: Christina Olivas).

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University is pleased to announce that it has been ranked fourth in the nation on MONEY magazine’s list of most transformative colleges.

“San Jose State University takes great pride in providing our students and their families with life-changing opportunities through higher education,” President Mary A. Papazian said.

San Jose State is the only four-year public comprehensive university to place in the top five. MONEY estimates average SJSU student debt at $15,000 and early career earnings at $58,500 annually, resulting in an earnings premium over peers of $12,100.

Exceeding expectations

“It’s not surprising that elite schools report high graduation rates or alumni success.” MONEY said. “What’s impressive is when a college helps students do far better than would be expected from their academic and economic backgrounds. We call this a college’s value add.”

In addition, MONEY ranked San Jose State 61st in the nation on its list of 727 best colleges for your money. SJSU received this ranking because its alumni earn high salaries after accruing little student debt.

“College is a great investment—if you choose the right school. MONEY analyzed graduation rates, tuition charges, family borrowing, and alumni earnings (plus 22 other data points) to find the country’s top values,” MONEY said.

An Affordable Price

The publication estimates 93 percent of San Jose State students who need aid receive grants averaging $14,000 annually to cover estimated costs of $28,800 annually.

“San Jose State University offers an excellent education at an affordable price,” President Papazian said. “This is why an increasing number of students are choosing SJSU as the place where they would like to prepare for a lifetime of meaningful contributions to our world.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

President Papazian to Deliver 2018 Fall Welcome Address

 

Media Contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – President Mary A. Papazian will deliver the Fall Welcome Address at noon Aug. 20 in the Diaz Compean Student Union Ballroom.

The president will highlight significant developments including the following:

  • Record enrollment of 35,000 regular and special session students, and the appointment of 65 new tenure-track faculty members.
  • An emphasis on student success, research, innovation and graduate programs.
  • The spring 2019 completion of the Spartan Recreation and Aquatic Center, and plans for an Interdisciplinary Science Building and a 1,600-bed residence hall.
  • The establishment of a permanent campus food pantry with Second Harvest Food Bank.
  • A commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the moment Spartans John Carlos and Tommie Smith took a stand for human rights at the 1968 Olympics.

All students, faculty, staff, community members and the news media are invited to attend this event. The address will be streamed live. Classes begin Aug. 21.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Receives 2018 CASE Educational Fundraising Award

gala brochure (Photo: David Schmitz)

SJSU’s fundraising program includes an annual gala (Photo: David Schmitz).

Media Relations contacts:
Pat Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University has received a 2018 Educational Fundraising Award from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). The honor is given each year to superior fundraising programs at educational institutions across the country.

“San Jose State’s strong fundraising efforts help ensure our students’ success and their contributions to Silicon Valley and California’s economy,” President Mary A. Papazian said.

SJSU is one of just five public comprehensive institutions nationwide with endowments over $35 million being honored for overall performance.

The award was based on the judges’ analysis of three years of SJSU’s fundraising data submitted to the annual Voluntary Support of Education survey.

According to CASE, SJSU has “demonstrated the highest levels of professionalism and best practice in its fundraising efforts” and “contributed to the betterment of educational advancement worldwide.”

“This is an exciting affirmation that we are on the right track in building a consistent pipeline of private support,” said Paul Lanning, vice president of University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation.

SJSU is among an exceptional group of 90 colleges, universities and independent schools receiving this year’s award.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Establishes Scholarship Fund Endowed by Alumna, Lawyer and Political Advisor Nancy McFadden

Nancy McFadden (Photo: Bob Bain)

Nancy McFadden (Photo: Robert Bain)

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University is pleased to announce the establishment of the Mary E. McFadden Nursing Scholarship Fund, made possible by a $230,000 gift from the estate of the late Nancy E. McFadden, a San Jose State alumna and former chief of staff to Governor Jerry Brown.

“Both Mary and Nancy McFadden were exemplary members of the San Jose State University Spartan community,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “They leveraged their educations to serve their families and communities while pursuing professional endeavors that made a real difference for our region, state and nation.”

Single mother Mary McFadden raised her children, Nancy and Bill, while working nights as a registered nurse at the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara hospital. Nancy completed degrees at San Jose State University and the University of Virginia School of Law before beginning a career in public service that included the Clinton administration in Washington, D.C., and the Davis and Brown administrations in Sacramento.

“San Jose State University’s College of Health and Human Sciences, through The Valley Foundation School of Nursing, is honored to be entrusted with the preservation of Mary and Nancy McFaddens’ SJSU legacy,” said Dean Mary Schutten. “Like Mary and Nancy McFadden, our nursing students seek to make an impact on their families and communities, and will benefit tremendously from this support.”

A Permanent Endowment

In accordance with the gift agreement, the McFadden gift will fund a permanent endowment to provide scholarships for students with demonstrated financial need who are enrolled in San Jose State’s nursing program. The scholarship will be awarded annually to one or more students, thereby making a significant impact on their educations.

“On behalf of the Tower Foundation of SJSU, I would like to thank the trustees of the Nancy McFadden estate for choosing to honor Nancy and Mary McFadden by creating an endowment to benefit students following in their footsteps,” said Vice President for University Advancement and Tower Foundation CEO Paul Lanning. “The foundation is honored to serve as the steward of these funds.”

A Commitment to Nursing

Nancy Elizabeth McFadden was born in Wilmington, Delaware, the eldest child of William McFadden and the former Mary Adams. The couple divorced when Nancy was a child, and Nancy moved with her mother and brother to San Jose.

Mary McFadden worked as a night nurse at Kaiser Santa Clara so that she could be available to her children, seeing them off to school in the morning and helping them after school through the early evening. Mary later became the night supervisor for the entire facility, and was beloved by her colleagues for her intelligence, sense of humor and practical nature. She worked until she was afflicted by a series of small strokes, passing away in 2000.

“Nancy had the highest respect for nurses and believed that nursing is a special calling. It was her fervent desire that students who need assistance to become nurses be given a helping hand to achieve their professional dreams,” wrote the trustees for Nancy McFadden’s estate.

“Best chief of staff”

Nancy McFadden attended San Jose State, where she was elected student body president and graduated with a bachelor’s in political science in 1984. After earning her law degree, she devoted most of her career to public service. She was deputy political director for the Clinton campaign; deputy associate attorney general under Janet Reno; general counsel to the U.S. Department of Transportation; and deputy chief of staff for Vice President Al Gore. After returning to California, McFadden served as senior advisor to Governor Gray Davis and chief of staff to Governor Jerry Brown.

McFadden counted among her greatest achievements spearheading a successful effort to extend the state’s extensive cap-and-trade program, setting a statewide limit on greenhouse-gas emissions. Her willingness to work for months and months behind the scenes to get things done was especially appreciated. Nancy McFadden died of ovarian cancer in March 2018 at age 59.

“Nancy was the best chief of staff a governor could ever ask for,” Governor Brown said. “She understood government and politics, she could manage, she was a diplomat and she was fearless. She could also write like no other. Nancy loved her job and we loved her doing it. This is truly a loss for me, for Anne, for our office, for Nancy’s family and close friends – and for all of California.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Celebrates the Class of 2018 at Commencement May 23-25

Photo: David Schmitz

Media contact:
Pat Lopes Harris, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University is taking a new approach to commencement: For the first time, SJSU will hold seven ceremonies (one per college) to provide each of this year’s more than 10,000 graduates the opportunity to be called by name and individually recognized as he or she crosses the stage.

“Commencement is the culmination of an entire set of aspirations and dreams for students who took the hard road to seek transformational opportunities for themselves and their communities,” President Mary A. Papazian said. “This ceremony, steeped in academic tradition, respectfully honors and celebrates our graduates with the faculty, family and friends who have been part of their journey.”

The ceremonies will be held over a three-day period beginning May 23 at Avaya Stadium and the Event Center at SJSU. All will be streamed live on the SJSU website, where a schedule of the ceremonies has been posted.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

The Class of 2018

The Class of 2018 reflects San Jose State and the California State University’s defining characteristics: opportunity, quality and success.

  • SJSU sends more college graduates into the Silicon Valley workforce than any other institution. This includes business, engineering and science graduates, in addition to education, social sciences, arts and humanities and applied sciences and arts degree holders.
  • An estimated one-third of SJSU students are the first in their families to attend college. Carlos Alberto Sanchez earned two degrees at SJSU, where he now teaches. The son of Mexican farmworkers, he is the 2018 President’s Scholar. He will be honored at the Social Sciences commencement ceremony.
  • SJSU has long produced the region’s teachers and nurses. SJSU will recognize 300 newly credentialed teachers and 449 new social workers, nurses, occupational therapists and other healthcare professionals at commencement.
  • SJSU will grant 36 doctoral degrees, including 22 doctoral degrees of nursing practice and 14 doctoral degrees of educational leadership to future university faculty members as well as educators and clinicians seeking professional development.
  • Students eligible for participation in the May 2018 commencement ceremonies have completed or will complete their studies in summer 2017, fall 2017, spring 2018 and summer 2018.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

Individual honors

Artemio Posadas, a celebrated musician, dancer and teacher of traditional Mexican music, will receive an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters at the Humanities and the Arts ceremony.

In addition, three outstanding graduates will be honored at this year’s commencement ceremonies.

  • Emily Moffitt will receive a master’s in environmental studies and the 2018 Outstanding Thesis Award at the Social Sciences ceremony. Her findings will help preserve Pacific-Slope Flycatcher bird habitats.
  • Two students will each receive the 2018 Outstanding Graduating Senior Award for their academic achievements, leadership roles, community work and personal achievements. Nardos Darkera will be recognized at the Applied Sciences and the Arts ceremony, where she will receive a bachelor’s in public health. Sierra Peace will be recognized at the Social Sciences ceremony, where she will receive a bachelor’s in psychology.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

New traditions

Among the very first items spectators will see at each ceremony is San Jose State’s new mace, an ornamental staff or scepter borne as a symbol of authority by the individual leading the processional of students, faculty and administrators as they enter the venue and take their seats.

A gift from the Tower Foundation of SJSU, the mace was designed and created this spring by Art and Art History Lecturer Yvonne Escalante, ’13 MFA Spatial Arts. She found inspiration for the design in both SJSU history and the paths students take to reach graduation.

This year’s venues

Avaya Stadium and the Event Center at SJSU were selected for this year’s commencement ceremonies in order to provide graduates and their loved ones with convenient and accessible venues. Avaya Stadium will host the Business, Engineering, Applied Sciences and the Arts, and Social Sciences ceremonies.

The Event Center at SJSU will offer an on-campus setting for the Education, Humanities and the Arts, and Science ceremonies. Taken together, the selection of these two venues symbolize San Jose State’s history, leadership, presence and collaborative relationship with downtown, the City of San Jose and the region.

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’15 Photojournalism

Joining the CSU’s 3.4 million alumni

Another highlight is the conferral of degrees, when President Papazian invites students to move their tassels from right to left. It is a powerful moment for graduates and their loved ones, and one that is replicated throughout the California State University, the nation’s largest four-year public university system, with 23 campuses and eight off-campus centers.

“As new opportunities await you, so too do new responsibilities for you are now and always part of the CSU alumni family,” Chancellor Timothy P. White said in his 2018 commencement statement. “You join a successful, impactful and generous community more than 3.4 million strong. Together, you build a better tomorrow for your neighbors, for the United States and for our world.”



About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

SJSU Presents 2018 Outstanding Seniors and Thesis Awards

Media contacts:
Pat Harris, SJSU Media Relations, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University President Mary A. Papazian will recognize this year’s top graduates at commencement ceremonies to be held May 23-25 at the SJSU Event Center and Avaya Stadium. Nardos Darkera and Sierra Peace will each receive the 2018 Outstanding Graduating Senior Award for academic achievements, leadership roles, contributions to the community and personal achievements. Emily Moffitt is the recipient of the 2018 Outstanding Thesis Award in recognition of the quality of her research.

Nardos Darkera

Nardos Darkera (all photos courtesy of the students)

Nardos Darkera, ’18 Public Health, has given back to the Spartan community while maintaining a 3.85 GPA. She has represented San Jose State as a United Nations Foundation Global Health Fellow, served as a peer teaching assistant, worked as a lead peer advisor in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts Success Center, and interned with Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. Darkera is a recipient of the Louie Barozzi Scholarship for academic excellence and community service, the Dean’s International Scholarship to study abroad in Puerto Rico, and the Health Science Scholarship to attend the American Public Health Association Meeting in Atlanta. She will continue on to the University of California, San Francisco, to pursue a master’s degree in global health. Health Science Professor Kathleen Roe predicts that Darkera “will be a leader of thought, social action, professions — and maybe even politics.”

Sierra Peace

Sierra Peace

Sierra Peace, ’18 Psychology, arrived at San Jose State as a 16-year-old freshman with her sights set on medical school. A member of SJSU’s International Neuroeconomics Institute research lab since 2015, Peace has presented two posters at the Western Psychological Association Conference. She juggled four jobs while volunteering with the Third Street Community Center, the Associated Students of SJSU community garden and the Regional Medical Center of San Jose. Her 3.97 GPA qualified her for Educational Opportunity Program Honors for four years. She was also a 2016 and 2017 Dean’s Scholar, a 2017 Hoover-Langdon Scholar and a 2018 President’s Scholar. Psychology Professor Cheryl Chancellor-Freeland describes Peace as “the most exceptional student I have encountered in my 23 years of teaching.”

Emily Moffitt

Emily Moffitt

Emily Moffitt, ’17 Environmental Studies, collected feathers from 169 birds at San Jose’s Coyote Creek Field Station, and then analyzed the feathers for stable isotopes to reveal where birds spent their breeding season. Her thesis “Using Stable Isotope Analysis to Infer Breeding Latitude and Migratory Timing of Juvenile Pacific-Slope Flycatchers (Empidonax difficilis)” revealed the species’ migratory patterns, critical information for preserving habitats the birds need to survive. She partnered with the University of California, Davis, Stable Isotope Facility to develop statistical programs and used ArcGIS to portray probable breeding origins, and support her research using isotope reference and Breeding Bird Survey data.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

Influential Educator of Traditional Mexican Music and Dance Artemio Posadas to Receive Honorary Degree

Artemio Posadas (National Heritage Fellow portrait by Tom Pich)

Artemio Posadas (National Heritage Fellow portrait by Tom Pich)

Media contacts:
Pat Harris, 408-924-1748,
pat.harris@sjsu.edu

SAN JOSE, CA – San Jose State University announced today that Artemio Posadas, a celebrated educator of traditional Mexican music and dance, will receive an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters during the College of Humanities and the Arts commencement ceremony beginning at 1:30 p.m. May 24 at the Event Center at SJSU. 

Artemio Posadas

Posadas was a 2016 National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellow. He was born in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, where he discovered son huasteco, regional music punctuated with poetic, instrumental and dance improvisation and falsetto breaks. The NEA posted excerpts of two lively numbers.

A graduate of the Universidad de San Luis Potosí, Posadas recorded regional sones with the late Beno Liberman for the Antología del Son Mexicano. In 1974, he started giving music and dance workshops in California, where he later became an American citizen. Since 1991, he has been teaching the youth at the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in Richmond, Calif.

Posadas served as a master artist through the Alliance for California Traditional Artists, and taught at the Center for Training and Careers in San Jose and in the East Bay public school system. A tremendous influence for generations, Posadas has taught musicians and dancers for 40 years.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 

Campus Safety March 19

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on March 19, 2018.

We are writing this morning to provide information about an overnight incident.

First, we would like to clearly state that the University Police Department has fully investigated the situation described below. There is no on-going threat. Classes are in session and it is business as usual this morning at San Jose State.

Regarding the incident, concerned friends contacted police yesterday to report a student who seemed to be experiencing a mental health crisis. We applaud the initiative this individual’s friends took to contact UPD to seek assistance. UPD officers interviewed the individual and eventually consulted with family members who came to campus to pick him up and seek appropriate care for him.

We would like to stress that this individual never made any threatening statements in any form and never expressed the intent to harm anyone. Comments on social media about the Peanuts restaurant on San Fernando Street were taken out of context.

Both the San Jose Police Department and UPD will be conducting patrol checks in the area of Peanuts as a precaution, but again, we do not believe there is a credible threat to the community.

If any community member receives information regarding a potential threat to the campus community, or if you have questions about such a situation, we ask that you make UPD your first point of contact so UPD can assess the threat and take appropriate action.

The University Police Department is available 24-7 at (408) 924-2222. We want to hear from you, and we are here to help.

Sincerely,

Charlie Faas, VP of Administration and Finance
Peter Decena, Chief of Police

 

 

 

Campus Safety: Alleged Sexual Assaults

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on March 14, 2018.

The University Police Department is seeking witnesses or survivors in connection with a sexual assault investigation.

The suspect, Luis Venegas, 21, has been arrested and is in custody at the Santa Clara County Jail. Venegas is a fourth-year San Jose State student who had been residing in Campus Village A (CVA).

The investigation began the evening of March 3, immediately after a survivor contacted UPD. During the course of the investigation, police learned of two additional survivors. Venegas was arrested March 5.

The suspect was charged with Sexual Assault, Assault with the Intent to Commit Sex Crimes, False Imprisonment and Sexual Battery. The three known cases occurred in CVA. In each case being investigated, the suspect and survivor knew one another.

Investigators believe there may be additional survivors or witnesses. If you have any information regarding this incident or this individual, please contact the University Police Department at (408) 924-2222 or Sgt. Justin Celano (408) 924-2218.

You may also submit a report anonymously through TipNow at (408) 337-2919 or SJSU@tipnow.org.

Resources are available on a confidential basis to all survivors of sexual assault, whether or not survivors choose to file a police report. For more information, please contact the San Jose State University Title IX Office at (408) 924-7290.

 

SJSU Receives $5 Million Signed Gift Commitment from Alumni, Business Leaders and Philanthropists Larry and Deirdre Solari

Media contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations Director, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Lawrence Fan, SJSU Athletics Media Relations Director, 408-924-1217, lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu

Larry and Deirdre Solari (photo by David Schmitz)

Larry and Deirdre Solari (photo by David Schmitz)


San Jose, Calif.
 — San Jose State University is pleased to announce that it has received a $5 million signed gift commitment from alumni, philanthropists and Monterey Peninsula residents Larry and Deirdre Solari. Their gift, among the largest ever to SJSU Athletics, will support SJSU football personnel and facilities, including plans for a new football operations center envisioned for the east side of CEFCU Stadium, Home of the Spartans.

“On behalf of the entire San Jose State University community, I would like to express my profound gratitude to Larry and Deirdre Solari for their leadership gift,” said President Mary A. Papazian. “This gift supports and honors more than a program; it expresses a deep commitment to the university and higher education as a pathway to opportunity.”

The new operations center will include locker rooms, offices, an auditorium and seating on the 50-yard line. In addition, the project would rebuild the stadium’s east side. This gift will therefore supplement improvements underway throughout South Campus, including recently completed tennis and golf facilities, and a soon-to-be-completed softball field.

“Larry and Deirdre Solari are long-time friends and supporters, and I am thrilled to have this opportunity to thank them for their generous gift,” said Athletics Director Marie Tuite. “The Solaris are now among our greatest benefactors in terms of investing in our football program and in assisting with our efforts to elevate the overall profile of the program. This is a touch point day for Spartan Football, Spartan Athletics and San Jose State University.”

Larry and Deirdre Solari: Spartans for Life

An aspiring engineer from a small farm town between Lodi and Stockton, Larry Solari transferred to San Jose State as a sophomore in 1961. Although San Jose’s population was small by modern terms, San Jose State offered all the perks of a metropolitan campus. Solari graduated in 1965 with a bachelor’s in business and industrial management, and completed an MBA one year later. In addition, he served as president of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, played baseball and regularly attended Spartan football games, both home and away.

Oakland native Deirdre Keefe attended San Jose State around the same time as her future husband. Like Larry, she was active in Greek life. As an Alpha Phi sorority member, she enjoyed Panhellenic traditions such as the Greek Show, Sparta Sings and Homecoming. She was elected Lambda Chi Alpha Crescent Girl in 1964. Her academic interests included teaching and psychology. She went on to work in television, advertising and executive recruitment. Larry and Deirdre met after college, on what proved to be a lucky blind date.

Building a strong foundation together

The Solaris built their life together based on their San Jose State experience. Larry’s nearly 30-year career with Owens-Corning Fiberglass took them to Toledo, Ohio, where they raised their family while he rose to serve as president of the company’s building materials group. The couple continued following college football including the Spartans, and resumed regularly attending SJSU football games when they returned to California. Now semi-retired, Larry is a private equity firm partner and serves on several boards.

At San Jose State, the Solaris observed former head coaches Mike MacIntyre and Dick Tomey, and appreciated their focus on building a strong foundation. The couple sees current Head Coach Brent Brennan taking a similar approach, influenced by his experience serving as an assistant coach during the MacIntyre and Tomey years.

“As a former athlete, I know the value of lessons learned on the field,” Larry Solari said. “As a businessman, I also know that we must provide the very best we can for our players, coaches and staff in order to attract the talent we need to sustain and grow Spartan football. It is one aspect of the university—a very visible one—and its success will raise the stature of San Jose State.”

Athletics Advancement: A new partnership

San Jose State launched a new fundraising model in August 2017, creating an Athletics Advancement team to elevate fundraising efforts, leverage University Advancement resources, and enhance day-to-day connectivity and alignment as the university works to increase resources for its student-athletes, coaches and support staff.

“When we embarked on this plan, we saw much to gain from combining the resources and talent of University Advancement and Athletics,” said Vice President for University Advancement Paul Lanning. “This commitment from the Solaris is proof positive that teamwork and cross-campus collaboration will raise San Jose State’s visibility and inspire alumni and supporters to invest in the university. I echo our president and athletics director in thanking the Solaris for their support.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study—offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.


About San Jose State University Athletics

San Jose State University’s athletics program sponsors 20 NCAA Division I sports (seven men’s and 13 women’s) and offers an intercollegiate athletics experience to at least 450 student-athletes annually. The Spartans compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest level of college football. San Jose State is a member of the Mountain West—a conference of 12 football-playing schools in the Pacific, Mountain and Hawaiian time zones.

 

Students Chronicle Change in “Harlem Reimagined”

collage of people and apartments

Students paid homage to James Van Der Zee, whose work presented Harlem as a deep residential and creative home to legions of black individuals, families, traditions, businesses and institutions of excellence.

Editor’s note: “Reimagining James Van Der Zee,” an exhibit based on the “Harlem Reimagined”  project described below, opens with a reception 4-6 p.m. Feb. 8 at the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library.

By David E. Early, Hearst Visiting Journalism Professor in Residence

One hundred years ago, James Van Der Zee, the famed cultural photographer, launched his Harlem-based business that focused on portraits, lifestyle, art, music, intellectual pursuits and numerous efforts at achieving racial equality for black folks.

Now, a century later, a team of photojournalism students from San Jose State University, led by Associate Professor Duane Michael Cheers, returned to New York on a project entitled, “Harlem Reimagined.”  Their task was to take an intense, visual inspection of the community today, as it deals with a wave of gentrification that threatens to diminish or remove Harlem as the nation’s black, cultural mecca.

In a four-day, on-the-ground, academic attack, the SJSU photo-rangers took a team of 10 to New York. That group became part of a roving army of 45 educators, reporters, guides, high school students, activists and Harlem locals — many of whom, with hungry cameras in tow — captured thousands of defining images.

Back when Van Der Zee was working, the prolific African-American shooter produced an enormous collection that beautifully captured all factions of Harlem life before, during and after the Harlem Renaissance. The photographer’s work, famously featured in a 1969 show at the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art, presented Harlem as a deep residential and creative home to legions of black individuals, families, traditions, businesses and institutions of excellence.

Student glasses

A portrait reflects Harlem today.

Today?

Harlem remains a busy and soulful, African-American village, but one that is absorbing an unsettling wave of gentrification. Left unchecked, the movement threatens to wipe out long-term residents, along with the schools, churches, businesses, neighborhoods, entertainment venues and social justice organizations that have defined African-American achievement for decades.

Surging real estate values have already shoved aside thousands of poor and middle-income blacks by building and refurbishing numerous living spaces into ultra-expensive domiciles. The great fear in Harlem is that gentrification might deliver on an oft-heard, cold declaration: “Those who can pay, can stay.”

The SJSU photo project hopes to capture the struggle against financial and racial forces that threaten to transform Harlem into something unrecognizable to the very people who have nourished it for decades.

The energetic shooters searched the streets, morning-til-night, looking for the shimmer and the shame, the pride and the poverty, the love and the loathing that happens when widespread change shoves a beloved community into an unknown realm.

MalcolmX

Students patrolled and shot life on streets named after black luminaries.

Students photographed everything from the famed Apollo Theater to the Studio Museum of Harlem. From parks bearing statues of Harriet Tubman and Duke Ellington, to the colorful frenzy of the Malcolm Shabazz Harlem Market, stuffed with genuine, African goods.

They patrolled and shot life on streets named after black luminaries — Frederick Douglass, Adam Clayton Powell and Martin Luther King Jr. — and challenged people, black and white, to discuss the unlikely conundrum: the possible dismantling of the most precious, black community in America.

Into the lenses of their roving cameras, shooters also caught The Shrine urban beats nightclub, The Graffiti Wall of Fame, Sylvia’s upscale soul restaurant and prominent academies named after Chief Justice Thurgood Marshall, author James Baldwin and educator Mary McLeod Bethune.

Up on Harlem’s Sugarhill, they shot a restaurant where comedian Redd Foxx and Malcolm X worked the kitchen together and a single apartment building where Supreme Court Justice Marshall, W.E.B. DuBois and Walter White once lived. Imagine, civil rights giants of the law, education and racial justice in a single structure along with another tenant Maestro Ellington, The Duke.

Students also explored unique and highly personal establishments: Sister’s Uptown Bookstore and Cultural Center, owned and operated by the inspirational Janifer Wilson, a retired physician at Bronx Lebanon Hospital who worked in the department of surgery. Today, she despairs that hers is the only black-owned bookstore in Manhattan.

Another store, Hats By Bunn, turned out to be a slim, miraculous emporium where one man crafts supple, sharp and colorful head wear by hand on an ancient machine. His store is also an easy-going, drop-in center for friends, and the curious and loving customers the world over.

“I make people look good and feel good,” says Bunn, whose creativity feeds off the music filling his shop six days a week. “My designs come from the rhythms of the moment.”

Whole Foods

The team of visual cultural excavators even looked at the fresh crop of unlikely new businesses, including Whole Foods.

The team of visual cultural excavators even looked at the fresh crop of unlikely new businesses: Whole Foods to Starbucks, CVS to Buffalo Wild Wings. They even absorbed the images out of a burger-and-fries eatery called Harlem Shake, whose owners confessed how they tried to honor the community by reproducing a funky, “Harlem vibe,” from back in the day.

In the end, the visual exploration of Harlem at this critical, life-altering moment in the community’s history, will become a riveting, educational document that will speak intelligently and from the heart in the service of cultural history, for decades to come.

“Reimagining James Van Der Zee” Opens at King Library

By Professor Michael Cheers, Associate Professor of Journalism

Thirty-four years after the death of renown photographer James Van Der Zee, the quintessential chronicler of the Harlem Renaissance and the greater Black community from 1906 to 1983, San Jose State University photojournalism students and New York alternative high school photo students met in Harlem last October to take a fresh look at one of America’s most culturally diverse, historically rich, vibrant and iconic, yet ever changing communities.

Students from the Satellite Academy High School and the James Baldwin School, both in Manhattan, participated in this extraordinary project developed by the SJSU School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

"A-Train Reimagined" is among the images captured by students.

“A-Train Reimagined” is among the images captured by students.

Exhibit Opens Feb. 8

Twelve students and their teachers from Satellite Academy are traveling to San Jose for the exhibition opening and reception 4-6 p.m. Feb. 8 at the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library. One photo student from Boynton High School in San Jose also participated, as did one local community college photo student.

More than 100 of the students’ images on 44 montages and individual portraits will be on display at the library’s second floor exhibition area until March 31. The montages show a kaleidoscope of diverse faces interspersed with a medley of iconic Harlem landmarks and competing cultures.

The project bridged Photo Voice methodology and hip-hop pedagogy. Using Apple-sponsored iPhones and DSLR cameras, the neophyte students canvassed the main boulevards, side streets, back streets, and alleys, capturing the sights and sounds, and the ebb and flow of Harlem through the lens of their innocence and freshness, documenting what they saw and felt.

group photo

Student and faculty participants gather for a group photo in Harlem.

SJSU Journalism Students and Faculty

The four SJSU journalism undergraduate beginning photo students selected were Payje Redmond, Franchesca Natividad, Lovetta Jackson and Savannah Harding.

Michael Cheers, associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Journalism and Mass Communications, was the lead researcher and facilitator. Juan Serna, SJSU Journalism TV studio manager/engineer served as a bi-lingual field instructor and chief post-production editor.

The project kicked-off Oct. 27, with a two-hour guided, orientation-walking tour of Harlem. The four-day experience ended on Oct. 29.

Janifer Wilson, owner of Sister’s Uptown Bookstore and Cultural Center.

Janifer Wilson, owner of Sister’s Uptown Bookstore and Cultural Center.


Harlem Reimagined

There were Marcus Garveyites and Van Der Zee Harlemites not willing to trade in, sell off or sell out the richness of their heritage. The students saw black vendors smiling at streams of white tourists while selling their wares to anyone because the only color that counts to them is green. They also heard from Janifer Wilson, owner of Sister’s Uptown Bookstore and Cultural Center, in the Sugar Hill section of Harlem, thought to be the only black-owned bookstore in Manhattan.

“Change has to happen in order for us to evolve, but the displacement of folk who are grassroots… the people who started these communities, is very disheartening,” Wilson said.

A site partnership was arranged with the prestigious Studio Museum in Harlem, where the students met daily to discuss their work. The museum also is the custodian of an extensive archive of the work of James Van Der Zee.

The exhibition moves to New York in April.

 

SJSU Hosts the Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic

Media contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations Director, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Lawrence Fan, SJSU Athletics Media Relations Director, 408-924-1217, lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu

 

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University is proud to announce that it will host the Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic July 30 to August 5 at SJSU’s new tennis complex. Through a five-year, minimum $1.5-million agreement, IMG rental fees will fund the construction of a custom stadium court for 4,000 fans and a state-of-the-art building housing locker rooms, a players’ lounge and coaches’ offices. The announcement was made jointly by SJSU, IMG, an Endeavor company, and the Mubadala Investment Company, a pioneer in strategic global investments.

“Northern California is known for its outstanding tennis at all levels and its support of professional tennis tournaments. It will be a privilege to host a world-class event like the Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic,” SJSU Athletics Director Marie Tuite said. “We look forward to hosting some of the most elite women’s tennis players in the world at our new tennis complex with the same hospitality, energy and service as when we hosted the Carolina Panthers for Super Bowl 50 and Lionel Messi and the Argentina national men’s soccer team for Copa Americano 2016.”
Purchase Tickets

World-class Event

The Spartan Tennis Complex opened in December 2017 and consists of six United States Tennis Association approved and illuminated outdoor courts. In the future, SJSU plans to add six covered courts to the tennis complex, which is conveniently located less than one mile south of Interstate 280’s Seventh and 10th street exits and a seven-minute drive from downtown San Jose.

More than 1,000 parking spaces less than a quarter-mile walk to the tennis complex will be available to spectators. Tournament players and officials also will have access to other SJSU South Campus athletics facilities.

“When we met with San Jose State, we could tell right away that they would be more than a venue, but a partner that was willing to invest and help us grow the event,” Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic Tournament Director Vickie Gunnarsson said.

Women’s Tennis Champions

First played in 1971 and most recently at Stanford University’s Taube Family Tennis Stadium, the Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic is a WTA Premier event and is the longest running women’s-only professional tennis tournament. The Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic is owned and operated by IMG, and features a 28-player singles draw and a 16-team doubles draw. Total prize money is $776,000.

Past champions Serena Williams, Lindsay Davenport, Billie Jean King, Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Monica Seles, Martina Hingis, Venus Williams and Kim Clijsters combined for 28 of the 47 Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic singles championships.

For Mubadala, the WTA event at San Jose State expands the company’s robust sponsorship portfolio in the tennis world. The Mubadala World Tennis Championship, now in its 10th year, is a December men’s tennis international event held in Abu Dhabi. Mubadala is a host level sponsor of the Rio Open, an ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals) 500 event in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil each February.

Tremendous Heritage

“Mubadala is proud to sponsor this tournament, which has such a tremendous heritage in the Bay Area and women’s tennis,” said Nadine Saleh Hassan, senior vice president for communications at Mubadala. “Silicon Valley is associated with innovation and great thinking, and we want to play a part in keeping such a championship-level sporting event in this area for fans and players alike.”

During the week of the tournament, there will be a variety of outreach initiatives including grassroots youth tennis clinics.

“IMG has a long-standing global relationship with Mubadala and we’re looking forward to leveraging their expertise in technology and innovation to raise the entertainment value for our fans,” WME and IMG Co-President Mark Shapiro said. “Mubadala’s commitment to the growth of tennis makes the company an ideal partner for us.”


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing 10,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 260,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 


About Spartan Athletics

San Jose State University sponsors 20 (seven men’s and 13 women’s) NCAA Division I intercollegiate sports programs for approximately 470 student-athletes annually. In football, the Spartans are a member of Division I’s Football Bowl Subdivision, the NCAA’s highest level of competition.

The Spartans’ primary conference affiliation is with the Mountain West. Selected teams belong to the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation, the Western Athletic Conference and the Golden Coast Conference. San Jose State has 10 NCAA team championships and 52 NCAA individual titles.

Sixty-two Spartans competed in one or more Olympic Games. San Jose State athletes have won seven gold, six silver and seven bronze medals at the Olympics. Annually, about one-third of the student-athlete population earns either an institutional, conference or national recognition based on outstanding academic performance.

 

Campus Update: Broken Water Pipe

Editor’s note: The following message is being emailed to all students, faculty and staff on Jan. 28, 2018.

All,

Repairs are underway and classes will be in session on Monday after a water pipe running underground between Campus Village 2 and Campus Village C broke open, sending a heavy stream of water down the San Carlos and Seventh Street paseos.

San Jose Water Company crews responded, and will spend the evening repairing the broken pipe and cleaning debris near the residence halls. Maintenance crews are also cleaning portions of the Student Wellness Center and Student Union. Both are expected to open for business as usual on Monday.

The San Jose Water Company pipe runs through campus on an easement, and does not service campus specifically. For this reason, water service to SJSU should not be disrupted.

We would like to extend our gratitude to all who have assisted with the repairs and cleanup, with a special thanks to Campus Village residents and staff as crews work outside through the night.

Regards,

Charlie Faas
VP Administration & Finance

SJSU Names Josh Thiel as Deputy Athletics Director for Athletics Advancement

Media contacts:
Pat Lopes Harris, SJSU Media Relations Director, 408-924-1748, pat.harris@sjsu.edu
Lawrence Fan, SJSU Athletics Media Relations Director, 408-924-1217, lawrence.fan@sjsu.edu

Josh Thiel

Josh Thiel


San Jose, Calif.
 — San Jose State University is pleased to announce Josh Thiel has been named deputy athletics director for athletics advancement, marking the successful culmination of a national search to fill this new position. An accomplished fundraising professional and seasoned administrator with two decades of successive experience in higher education, Thiel will lead a new University Advancement team dedicated to supporting SJSU Athletics. His first day heading the athletics advancement unit will be Jan. 29.

“I am thrilled to introduce Josh Thiel to the San Jose State University community,” Vice President for University Advancement Paul Lanning said. “Thiel is well prepared to lead the growing University Advancement team that is dedicated to collaborating with SJSU Athletics on expanding support for student athletes, coaches and the university overall, with the goal of meeting, and then perhaps exceeding, peer institutions.”

Thiel brings to San Jose State a successful record as senior associate athletics director and chief development officer at Rice University, where he and his team completed $41.5 million in fundraising for capital projects including a football operations and student-athlete training center, locker and team rooms for six sports, a grandstand and team space for track, and a new batting cage and hospitality area for baseball. Previously, Thiel served as an associate development director for Stanford Athletics and the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Important asset for SJSU and SJSU Athletics

“Josh Thiel will be an important asset for San Jose State and SJSU Athletics as we grow competitively in the Mountain West and complete improvements to our South Campus sports facilities,” Athletics Director Marie Tuite said. “Josh’s athletics, collegiate and development experience is exactly what we need to realize the potential for our athletics advancement unit as we seek to leverage everything we have with the goal of transforming support for our student athletes, coaches, staff, and the university as a whole.”

Reporting to the vice president for University Advancement, with a dotted-line reporting relationship to the director of athletics, Thiel will oversee collaborations with athletics and advancement leadership on major gifts, special events and other external functions. In addition, he and his team will guide athletics-focused annual giving and related efforts currently housed in the Spartan Foundation, the Order of Sparta and the Quarterback Club.

“I have long admired San Jose State University for the value Spartans place on success on the field, in the classroom, and through service to the larger community,” Thiel said. “As San Jose State seeks to capture more conference titles and as it continues to modernize its storied athletics complex, there are many opportunities to build support in the heart of Silicon Valley and beyond. I am looking forward to leading a team with such enormous potential.”

Proven leader and seasoned professional

Thiel brought a new sense of energy and enthusiasm to Rice Athletics, where he and his team revitalized fundraising as follows:

  • Completed $41.5 million in fundraising for capital projects including a football operations and student-athlete training center, locker and team rooms for six sports, a grandstand and team space for track, and a new batting cage and hospitality area for baseball.
  • Doubled cash received to $14.75 million during his first year as chief development officer.
  • Assisted with solicitation plan for $12 million gift, the largest in Rice Athletics history.
  • Increased the number of donors by 78 percent in three years, including a 110 percent increase in annual fund donors.

At Stanford, Thiel fostered relationships that resulted in a number of firsts for the medical school and for athletics.

  • Served as a development liaison for football, men’s basketball, baseball, men’s and women’s soccer, softball, women’s lacrosse, synchronized swimming, men’s and women’s volleyball, men’s and women’s water polo, and wrestling.
  • Closed $750,000 in gifts for the university’s first two student-athlete summer school scholarships.
  • Secured the lead gift for a $700,000 wrestling team room renovation.
  • Raised $3 million for the medical school’s Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge.

By accepting this new role at San Jose State, Thiel will be returning to the California State University system. He received a bachelor’s in business administration-finance from California State University, Fullerton, in 1996, and a master’s of sports management from the University of San Francisco in 1999.

TRANSACTIONS

San Jose State University — Named Josh Thiel deputy director of athletics for athletics advancement.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San José State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 250 areas of study – offered through its eight colleges.

With more than 35,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San José State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.


About San Jose State University Athletics

San Jose State University’s athletics program sponsors 20 NCAA Division I sports (7 men’s and 13 women’s) and offers an intercollegiate athletics experience to at least 450 student-athletes annually. The Spartans compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest level of college football. San Jose State is a member of the Mountain West — a conference of 12 football-playing schools in the Pacific, Mountain and Hawaiian time zones.

 

SJSU Power Outage

8:45 p.m., Jan. 3

Power has been restored to the full campus, including the Campus Village residential complex, Student Union and King Library.

The expectation is classes will be in session on Thursday, Jan. 4, and all buildings and offices will be open as usual.

Due to a campus power outage that began at 10 a.m. Jan. 3, all non-essential employees were released. Classes were cancelled. King Library and the Student Union were closed.

The San Jose State men’s basketball game against UNLV went on as scheduled. Generators powered the Event Center.

The power outage affected the main campus only. The South Campus athletics offices and complex remained open and in operation.

The University Police Department remained open and available at 408-924-2222.