Supreme Court Ruling on DACA; SJSU Town Hall on June 24

Editor’s Note: Below is a message President Mary A. Papazian shared with the campus community on June 18, 2020.

Dear campus community,

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling today, June 18, preserving the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, ensures that current DACA recipients at SJSU and across the country can continue to pursue their higher education dreams and goals. This ruling will provide some relief to many in our community who have awaited the decision with tremendous anxiety and fear. Today’s decision is very good news, but we must remain vigilant over the long term.

The ruling was about the process used to terminate the DACA program and not about the merits of the program itself. There remains much work to be done to provide long-term solutions for DACA recipients. SJSU will continue to partner with county and local community agencies as well as the CSU system to provide access to support students, faculty and staff. Support will continue to span a range of needs, such as renewal and applications for DACA, connection to services provided by legal non-profits and information-sharing about accessing and applying for funding to cover application and renewal fees. And, of course, SJSU’s UndocuSpartan Student Resource Center will continue to provide resources for all undocumented students, including DACA students and employees.

In an effort to provide clarity on the impact of this ruling for our students and employees, SJSU will host a virtual town hall on Wednesday, June 24, from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm. During the first half of the meeting, speakers will provide more detailed explanation about what the decision means for our campus. During the second half, participants who wish to do so are invited to share their experiences and ask questions.

Today is an important moment for DACA recipients and higher education. San José State University values the continued success of all of its students and employees.

Sincerely,

Dr. Mary A. Papazian
President


A reminder to all: SJSU will not assist federal, state, or local agencies with requests about a campus member’s immigration status. Any inquiries from ICE or other agencies about a campus member’s immigration status should be directed to our University Police Department at (408) 924-2222.

SJSU Faculty Prepare for Fall 2020

More than 1,000 faculty members hone their skills to improve student experience in online courses

With the California State University system recently deciding on a shift to mostly virtual classes for the fall 2020 semester, SJSU faculty members are taking part in the SJSU Teach Online Summer Certificate Program. The program is being supported by a partnership that features the SJSU Center for Faculty Development, eCampus, the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (ODEI), and the outside organization Online Learning Consortium (OLC).

More than 1,000 faculty members have signed up for the three-week online program, which will support them in inclusive, accessible and well-designed online and hybrid instruction for Fall courses.

“I’m excited by the response from our faculty members, who recognize the importance of this opportunity to create the best learning experiences for our students for fall 2020 and beyond,” said Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Vincent Del Casino Jr.

Screengrab of the SJSU Teach Online Summer Certificate Program

Jennifer Redd, Director of eCampus, presents during the first session of the SJSU Teach Online Summer Certificate Program on June 8, 2020.

Faculty members must complete seven modules to earn a certificate, badge and stipend. The program is led by experienced online instructors from a wide range of disciplines who will provide guidance and support. To establish a strong benchmark for everyone participating in the institute, 33 faculty members will be participating in a “train-the-trainer” workshop to serve as program mentors.

“The spring semester prompted a rapid shift in teaching and learning for students, faculty and staff alike,” said eCampus Director Jennifer Redd. “That we can invest in helping faculty members create quality teaching experiences for the fall that represent their dedication is critical to our campus’ long-term success.”

The program begins with a two-hour synchronous session, where faculty members will be introduced to hybrid options for curriculum and how to ensure equity in online teaching.

After the online session, participants will have three weeks to complete seven modules. Four modules are required to be completed by every faculty member:

  • Mastering Online Teaching Essentials,
  • Supporting Universal Design for Learning,
  • Analyzing Assessment Strategies and
  • Equity and Inclusion Frameworks in Design in Online Settings
Screenshot of a lesson from the SJSU Teach Online Summer Certificate Program

Chief Diversity Officer Kathy Wong(Lau) leads a discussion during the first session of the SJSU Teach Online Summer Certificate Program on June 8, 2020.

“I am grateful that ODEI could create a research-informed module on best practices and resources that attend to equity and inclusion in online course design, facilitation, and materials,” said Chief Diversity Officer Kathy Wong(Lau). “Working with this team of campus collaborators has been fantastic.” The additional three modules are selected from a group of optional modules on topics that include how to integrate support services for students, create robust online labs and simulations, and use Adobe’s Creative Cloud solutions in the classroom.

“Experts from across the campus have designed a program that will help any instructor strengthen their teaching, no matter how experienced they are to start,” said Center for Faculty Development Director Deanna Fassett.

Given the overwhelming interest, faculty members have been assigned to cohorts. The first cohort started June 8, with the other two sessions beginning June 29 and July 20.

Along with this program, faculty members are also pursuing opportunities through the CSU Chancellor’s Office, SJSU’s Center for Faculty Development, eCampus, and the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

 

SJSU Appoints Vice President for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation

New Vice President of University Advancement, Theresa Davis.

New Vice President for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation, Theresa Davis.

Theresa Davis has been appointed vice president for University Advancement and CEO of the Tower Foundation. She will join the San Jose State campus community on July 1, 2020.

“Theresa joins us at a pivotal moment in SJSU history, and we are delighted to have her on board,” said President Mary A. Papazian.

Davis brings an abundance of relevant experience to the position, including more than 25 years of management and fundraising work. Her background is broad and diverse, with campaign management, major gifts, corporate and foundation relations and annual giving among her areas of expertise.

Most recently, Davis has been serving as the assistant vice president of engagement and annual programs at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). In that role, she has had responsibility for Alumni Relations, the Caltech Associates, the Caltech Fund and Parents Program, and Campus Programs—which engages its local community in campus life.

Prior to working at Caltech, Davis was the associate vice president of college and program development at Cal State Fullerton. She had responsibility for the directors of development, who spearheaded fundraising efforts for each of the campus’s eight colleges and athletics department.

Davis previously served as the associate vice president of major and planned gifts at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), where she and her team secured financial support for medical specialties. Prior to that, she was campaign director for the California Science Center, served as senior director of development for the UCLA College, was director of development for the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management at UC Riverside and held the roles of associate director of corporate relations and director of the alumni fund, both at Caltech.

Davis has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Arizona State University and a master’s in public administration from the University of Southern California.

Earth Month 2020 Goes Online

Student on the tower lawn doing a yoga pose.

Yoga on the Tower Lawn, one of many resource fair activities for Earth Week 2019. Photo by David Schmitz.

Fifty years ago, on April 22, Gaylord Nelson created history by choosing to commemorate the legacy of the only home we know, Earth.

Affected by the devastating oil spill off the Santa Barbara coast in 1969, the former U.S. Senator and Wisconsin governor led a grassroots movement with the hope that the day would inspire people to listen to the environment and collectively share the responsibilities that humans owe to the planet.

The founder of Earth Day, Nelson, ’39 Political Science, was an SJSU alumnus. Despite COVID-19 derailing full-scale campus events and activities, San Jose State remains committed to Nelson’s story.

This year, Earth Month has moved online. A good benefit to having an online celebration such as this, is “that not many people are driving, and that’s way less air pollution already,” said Debbie Andres, ’07 Chemical Engineering, SJSU senior utilities and sustainability analyst.

This April, the SJSU Office of Sustainability is running a robust social media campaign, the Earth Day Eco Challenge, in collaboration with campus Environmental Resource Center (ERC) and Cesar Chavez Community Action Center (CCCAC). In addition, there are a host of exciting educational events and activities in the form of virtual teach-ins, reading assignments, workshops, green career panels, and discussions, all of which will offer an opportunity for students to join in the environmental conversations.

Earth Day was founded on the spirit of teach-in—an activity Nelson designed to educate people about the environment. According to Katherine Cushing, professor of environmental studies, “there are many sources out there that discuss possible linkages between large scale environmental issues, such as climate change, air pollution and the COVID-19 pandemic.” The Earth Day assignment, “COVID-19, Climate Change, and the Environment,” that Cushing built for her students will help put many different factors surrounding these issues in perspective.

Cushing has been spearheading the effort to provide the faculty with resources for incorporating a sustainability component in their courses this month. Six different assignments are available that are applicable to majors from a wide range of academic disciplines, ranging from business to biology.

A plaque in front of a tree which says planted in honor of Gaylord Nelson.

Every year, students plant a tree on campus. Photo by David Schmitz.

April Events:

Menstruation, Stigma, Zero Waste Period

Tune into this pre-recorded event posted on both the Sustainability Office’s and Gender Equity Center’s YouTube channel. Get to know about the taboos, misconceptions, and sustainable methods for a greener world. This event is brought to you by the Gender Equity Center and the Office of Sustainability. All genders welcome.

April 16: Being the Change: Book discussion

Noon–1 p.m.

This one-hour discussion on climate change will run with Eugene Cordero, SJSU meteorology and climate change professor. The group will be reviewing Chapters 1-6 of Being the Change by Sara K. Ahmed. Register to attend Being the Change.

April 21 and 23: Sustainable Designs and Buildings on the SJSU Campus

April 21: 9–10: 15 a.m. and 1:30–2:45 p.m.
April 23: 9–10:15 a.m. and 1:30–2:45 p.m.

Join Art History Professor Molly Hankwitz and her students as they present a series of brief presentations on sustainable design materials and resources on the SJSU campus. Featured buildings include the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, the Student Recreation and Aquatic Center, and the Diaz Campion Student Union. Original posters designed by students will also be previewed in honor of Earth Day. Register in advance for this meeting.

April 22: The Climate Reality Project

12 p.m

The climate crisis is already affecting ecosystems and communities across the globe, but it is not too late to take action. This climate reality presentation will show you how. The presentation is non-partisan, from the perspective of science. The presentation is broken into three parts—”Must We Change,” “Can We Change” and “Will We Change.” Engage with Emeritus Professor and Director of Sbona Honors Program & Thompson Global Internship Program Bill DeVincenzi and ask any questions you may have. Register for The Climate Crisis: What you need to know.

April 29: Green Career Panel

Noon–2 p.m.

The Green Career Panel will be hosted in partnership with the Career Center, followed by networking opportunities. Learn from and engage with panelists from the California Water Efficiency Partnership, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Silicon Valley Leadership Group, The City of San Jose, Rising Sun Power. Register for SJSU Green Career Panel Registration.

April 30:

Participate in the SJSU Earth Month Instagram Giveaway! Learn more at @sjsugreencampus via Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

Learn more about the university’s sustainability practices by reviewing the 2017-2020 SJSU Sustainability Report.

SJSU Admitted Spartan Day Goes Online, April 18 – 24

Admitted Spartan Day

Admitted SJSU students can log online to experience Admitted Spartan Day from April 18 – 24, 2020.

Every spring, after San Jose State has notified admitted students of their acceptance for the following year, the university hosts a special event, Admitted Spartan Day, to welcome potential Spartans to campus. While the preference is always to show incoming freshmen and transfer students the SJSU campus in person, the Coronavirus health pandemic prevents the university from hosting students and their families on campus at this time. Instead, SJSU has expanded this year’s Admitted Spartan Day to a weeklong virtual event to ensure that prospective students have all the information they need to choose San Jose State.

“This is a first for us to offer this campus-wide event online. We usually host more than 10,000 people for Admitted Spartan Day,” said SJSU Senior Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management Sharon Willey. “Each day will feature live webinars and video content so students and family members can choose which sessions are of interest to them. We are working diligently to personalize our SJSU Virtual Open House for each admitted undergraduate student with a variety of opportunities to interact with current students, faculty and staff. We hope to ensure that students see the many benefits of attending SJSU. The top three reasons admitted students choose SJSU is the quality of academic programs, cost and location.”

This year’s virtual event will kick off on Saturday, April 18, with welcome messages from college deans and videos that introduce students to college life at SJSU. Admitted students can watch content live or view the recorded webinars later at a time that works for their schedule. The week will continue with virtual tours, Zoom workshops and presentations:

Saturday, April 18: Academic and Campus Life Kickoff

This includes welcomes from the deans, webinars with colleges and/or departments, as well as webinars on campus life, orientation and student involvement.

Sunday, April 19: Virtual Tours

This includes virtual campus tours (general, Student Union, Spartan Recreation and Aquatic Center, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, South Campus and the Hammer Theatre) as well as a student panel live webinar and parent panel.

Monday, April 20: All About Finances

Video content will include webinars by the Bursar’s Office, Financial Aid and the Career Center, including information on how to get a job on campus.

Tuesday, April 21: University Housing

The International House and on-campus residence halls will be featured, including tours and live webinars.

Wednesday, April 22: Campus Resources

Virtual content includes videos on the Latinx/Chicanx Student Success Center, the African-American/Black Student Success Center, the Asian Pacific Islander Desi (South Asian) American (APIDA) task force, the Veterans Resource Center, the UndocuSpartan Resource Center, the Career Center and many more campus resources.

Thursday, April 23: Supporting Spartan Success: Advising at SJSU

College student success centers and Academic Advising and Retention Services will host presentations and webinars to share how advising works and respond to admitted student inquiries online.

Friday, April 24: Next Steps in the Admissions Process

SJSU admission recruiters will be available to answer questions from students about their admission and the intent to enroll process.

SJSU Vice President for Student Affairs, Patrick Day, provides further details:

 
Admitted students are encouraged to fill out an interest form to inform SJSU which topics they would like to learn more about during the week of online activities. Additional information can be found at sjsu.edu/admissions or admittedspartan@sjsu.edu.

Associated Students Holding Virtual Election for Board of Directors

Editor’s Note: Updated as of April 14, 2020. Voting closes at 8 a.m. on Friday, April 17 instead of Thursday, April 16. Election results will now be shared via Zoom on Friday, April 17, starting at 12 p.m.

Casting a ballot for the newest Associated Student (A.S.) representatives is a spring tradition at SJSU, and because most students are away from campus because of COVID-19, it is going virtual for the first time.

On Monday, April 13, from 5-7 p.m., students can watch candidate debates via Zoom. Information on how to watch the debate is available on the A.S. website.

Immediately after the debate ends, SJSU students can cast their vote for 12 A.S. Board of Directors positions. Voting closes at 8 a.m. on Thursday, April 16. The election results will be shared via Zoom on Thursday, April 16, starting at 12 p.m.

Cynthia Fernandez-Rios, ’21 Business Administration, serves as the Chief Elections Officer and led the charge in transitioning the A.S. election to a virtual format alongside Student Elections Commission (SEC) Advisor and A.S. Leadership and Government Coordinator, Samantha Quiambao.

“In order to help normalize the situation, we constantly communicate and update all candidates via email,” Fernandez-Rios said. “In the past A.S. has not publicized candidates, however, this year, we have made a tremendous effort to promote all candidates running for all positions.”

Fernandez-Rios said the hardest part about the transition to a virtual election was altering the A.S. Election requirement of attending pre-election events. The SEC team used social media to share candidates’ responses to the question “What is the biggest change you want to see at SJSU?” The candidates also submitted a video discussing their platform and what they would do if they were elected.

“Using social media as much as we have has been very exciting,” Fernandez-Rios said. “The videos created by each candidate were a great idea and will be a continued expectation fornext year.”

Students who vote are automatically entered into a random drawing, with A.S. swag bags and major and minor prizes up for grabs. The prizes will be mailed to the students or shipped to the closest Amazon lockbox.

“Cynthia and her team worked so hard to get students interested in running for positions, and it was difficult to deal with the current situation knowing that they needed to cancel all their plans,” said A.S. Executive Director Carole Dowell. “I hope for a great voter turnout as a recognition of their efforts and motivation.”

Women’s History Month at SJSU

Womxn's Herstory Calendar 2020

Women’s History Calendar at SJSU 2020.

This March, San Jose State is recognizing Women’s History Month with a series of lectures and activities in collaboration with SJSU’s Gender Equity Center, the PRIDE Center, the MOSAIC Cross Cultural Center, the Division of Student Affairs, the Cesar Chavez Community Action Center, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, the African-American/Black Student Success Center, and Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences.

Upcoming Events

100 Years of Women's Suffrage

“100 Years of Women’s Suffrage in the South Bay,” an exhibit in Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library’s Special Collections, is on display through December 2020.

100 Years of Women’s Suffrage in the South Bay

Available through December 15
SJSU Special Collections and Archives

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, fifth floor

This exhibit showcases archival materials related to the local origins of women’s suffrage and traces these roots through to the present day. It features materials from former mayors Janet Gray Hayes and Dianne McKenna, ’77 MA Urban and Regional Planning, former council member Blanca Alvarado, Kate Kennedy, a member of the first graduating class of the Normal School who became known for her campaigning for equal pay for women and organizations such as the National Women’s Political Caucus, the National Organization for Women and the League of Women Voters.

Open Mic: Trans Visibility

Thursday, March 5
Diaz Compean Student Union Starbucks Lounge, 6–8 p.m.

Hosted in collaboration with SJSU’s MOSAIC Cross Cultural Center, this open mic will highlight transgender womxn.

Keynote and Booksigning: Sonya Renee Taylor

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Sonya Renee Taylor is an artist, activist, founder and radical executive officer of The Body is Not an Apology, a digital media and education company with content reaching half a million people worldwide each month. Named one of 99 Dream Keepers and a 2015 Outstanding Partner Award by Planned Parenthood, Taylor was one of 12 “women who paved the way for body positivity” by Bustle magazine in 2015 and honored as one of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts’ 100 artists. In addition to offering poetry and performance workshops, she has spoken on body empowerment, radical self-love as a transformative action and intersectional social justice.

Bettina Apethker: Celebrating Woman Suffrage (1920 – 2020) and the Ongoing Campaign for Voting Rights

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library 225

Bettina Apethker, ’76 MA Mass Communications, is a distinguished professor emerita of feminist studies at UC Santa Cruz and holder of the Peggy and Jack Baskin UC Presidential Chair for Feminist Studies. A political activist since the 1960s, Apethker is the author of several books, including Woman’s Legacy: Essays on Race, Sex and Class in American History (1982), The Morning Breaks: The Trial of Angela Davis (1976; 1999) and Intimate Politics: How I Grew Up Red, Fought for Free Speech and Became a Feminist Rebel (2006). She is currently working on a book, Queering the History of the Communist Left in the United States. Apethker was a women’s studies and African American studies lecturer at SJSU before entering the history of consciousness program at UCSC, where she received her doctorate.

Spartan Speaker Series: Ibtihaj Muhammad

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Wednesday, March 11
Student Union Ballroom, 7 p.m.

Join the Spartan Speaker Series to hear Ibtihaj Muhammad, the first female Muslim-American athlete to medal at the Olympics. A 2016 Olympic bronze medalist, 5-time Senior World medalist and World Champion, Muhammad is the first American woman to compete in the Olympics in hijab and a sports ambassador with the U.S. Department of State’s Empowering Women and Girls through Sport Initiative.

Mujer Divina: Divine Feminine

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Thursday, March 12
Chicanx/Latinx Student Success Center, 5–7 p.m.

The Cesar Chavez Community Action Center, in collaboration with The Chicanx/Latinx Student Success Center, presents: a dialogue-based workshop about womxn empowerment and how to combat stereotypes within the Latinx community. This workshop is based on the themes of womxn issues within the Latinx community, but ALL are welcome no matter how you identify. To attend, fill out the Mujer Divina (The Divine Feminine) RSVP form.

Art Exhibition: Gender Through Cultural Storytelling

CANCELED BUT IN THE PROCESS OF MOVING ONLINE
Monday, March 16

Diaz Compean Student Union Meeting Room 4, 10 a.m.–6:30 p.m.

The Gender Equity Center and MOSAIC Cross Cultural Center will host an art exhibition on the intersection of gender and culture, providing an opportunity for people to share their narratives of gender through cultural storytelling during an open mic from 5 – 6:30 p.m.

Latinas and Libros Book Club

CANCELED 

Tuesday, March 17
Student Union, Room 3

Modern Latina presents Latinas and Libros, an evening to celebrate contributions of Latinas in literature in collaboration with SJSU’s Chicanx/Latinx Student Success Center. The free event will feature Latina authors sharing their stories and signing books while guests enjoy Mexican hot chocolate and pan dulce. To attend, fill out the Latinas & Libros RSVP form.

Reproductive Justice and Sexual Rights: Tanya Bakhru

OFFERED ONLINE THROUGH ZOOM  sjsu.zoom.us/j/207076300 |
Wednesday, March 18

Hugh Gillis Hall 229, 4:30–6 p.m.

SJSU Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Tanya Bakhru will speak about her book, Reproductive Justice and Sexual Rights. The book takes an intersectional, interdisciplinary and transnational approach, presenting work that provides a nuanced and in-depth understanding of the role of globalization in the sexual and reproductive lives of gendered bodies in the 21st century.

Transgender Day of Visibility

Monday, March 23
7th St. Plaza, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

Carol Mukhopadhyay Lecture Series

Carol Mukhopadhyay Lecture Series presents Larissa M. Mercado-Lopez: Shaping Feminist Futures Through Children’s Literature: Notes on Feminist Writing and Editorial Practices

Monday, March 23
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library 225, 1:30–2:40 p.m.

Larissa M. Mercado-Lopez is an associate professor of Women’s Studies at California State University, Fresno, where she teaches courses on women of color feminisms and Latina health. Additionally, she is senior advisor for the Public Scholar Institute through the National Center for Institutional Diversity at the University of Michigan. Mercado-Lopez will discuss her work as a children’s book writer and sensitivity reader for children’s literature. Drawing from Black and Chicana feminist thought on the power of children’s books, she will situate her work within the larger context of women of color feminism and Latinx children’s literary writing. Mercado-Lopez will issue a call to Women’s Studies students and scholars to consider their potential to transform their social world through work in the children’s book writing and publishing industries.

SJSU Professor Emerita of Anthropology Carol Mukhopadhyay sponsors this annual lecture series.

Zines for Queens

CANCELED 

Tuesday, March 24
Student Union Room 4B, 1–2:30 p.m.

Wednesday, March 25
MOSAIC Cross Cultural Center, 3–5 p.m.

Celebrate women’s history month by learning the importance of writing our own history and contribute to a collective zine based on poetry by women of color. To attend, fill out the Zines for Queens RSVP form.

Film Screening: RBG

CANCELED BUT FILM IS AVAILABLE ON HULU

Wednesday, March 25
Student Wellness Center 122, 1:30–2:45 p.m.

RBG is an intimate portrait of an unlikely rock star, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. With unprecedented access, the filmmakers explore how early legal battles changed the world for women in the U.S.

Nuestra JENTE: Postcolonial Sexualities

Wednesday, March 25
SJSU PRIDE Center, 1–2:30 p.m.

Join us for a discussion on postcolonial gender variance and how it challenged sexuality.

Black Women’s Collective Meeting

CANCELED 

Tuesday, March 25, Whine Down

The Black Women’s Collective is an organization whose purpose is to support Black women at San Jose State in social, academic and political spaces. For more information, visit Black Women’s Collective’s Instagram.


All events are wheelchair accessible. For accommodations, please call the Gender Equity Center at (408) 924-6500 or email sjsugenec@gmail.com.

For more information on these events, please visit The Gender Equity Center’s 2020 Event Schedule.

Coffee, Pizza With the President Offer Members of the Campus Community Opportunities for Discussion, Conversation

President Papazian talks with staff members at a "Coffee with the President" event.

SJSU president Mary Papazian participates in a coffee with staff on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

A spate of new initiatives launched by President Mary A. Papazian recently are designed to give members of the campus community more frequent opportunities to engage with the Office of the President in an informal, personal atmosphere that allows for open conversation and a free flow of ideas and concerns.

“Coffee with the President” was conceived as a way for SJSU staff and faculty members to visit with President Papazian over a cup of java. Administration and Finance, IT, and University Personnel were the first units to join the president, and other groups will soon see invitations of their own in their inboxes.

“Most of the SJSU staff doesn’t get a chance to meet and talk with the president in a small, intimate setting like this,” said Harish Chandler, senior programmer and analyst in the Information Technology division who attended the first “Coffee with the President” event. “It provided an opportunity for staff members to do exactly that.”

Chandler said he was able to talk one-on-one with Papazian near the end of the event, so he discussed with her issues such as phone and laptop charging stations for students, the university’s green initiative and possible changes to campus dining and food options.

Tony Cefalu, who works in the University Police parking services group, was equally enthusiastic.

“I had a great time,” he said. “It was wonderful to mingle, socialize, chat, laugh with others and meet the president. I loved it.”

The president herself said the venue offered a different environment than many of the administrative meetings she attends.

“I think I probably get more out of this than the staff members,” said Papazian. “Meeting with university staff members in a relaxed, social setting gives me a welcomed chance to listen directly without any managerial or supervisory filters that staff members might sometimes encounter.”

Another recent outreach event—this one involving pizza, a staple among college students—was similar in nature. “Pizza with the President” gave students an opportunity to talk with their university president about issues important to them. Indeed, issues such as parking and student housing were discussed, while the venue also offered Papazian a chance herself to point out to students some of the positive developments taking place around campus such as the new Spartan Recreation and Aquatic Center, the Spartan Food Pantry and recent successes with SJSU’s football team and other athletics programs. Initiated by previous Associated Students President Ariadna Manzo, the event provided such an important opportunity for the president to hear directly from students that at the start of this academic year she looked for an opportunity to host the event again.

President Papazian and AS President Branden Parent talk to students at a "Pizza with the President" event.

Mary Papazian, San José State University president, takes questions from students at a pizza with the president event at Village 2 Nov. 13, 2019. (Photo: Jim Gensheimer)

Lisa Millora, the president’s chief of staff, said other plans have moved forward to host office hours during which members of the campus community can sign up for individual meetings with the president. There may even be an opportunity next year to participate in a reading group with the president and other members of the community.

When she arrived last January, Millora explained, some members of the campus community wanted opportunities to meet and chat with the president in a more informal setting.

“The president and I talked about what we could do to create such opportunities and the result was this new set of initiatives,” said Millora.

“The coffees and office hours are intended to provide all members of the community the chance to talk with the president about things that are important to them,” Millora said. “The president cares deeply about members of the campus community, so we will continue to explore different ways to ensure that they feel the president is fully and consistently engaged with them.”

 

Student Affairs Faculty Fellows Support the Diverse Spartan Community

Faculty Fellow Julia Curry Rodríguez, associate professor of Mexican American Studies, speaking with a student at the Chicanx/Latinx Spring Welcome. Photo by David Schmitz.

A partnership between SJSU Academic Affairs and Student Affairs, San Jose State University’s Student Affairs Faculty Fellows program is designed to support students’ academic success and connections with faculty members outside of the classroom. Faculty members are embedded as fellows across the university’s student success centers during the academic year.

“This is the fourth year of the program. Faculty fellows work eight hours a week in the centers or on programs supporting students. The projects help them connect, mentor and support students from varied disciplines and cultural backgrounds,” said Sonja Daniels, associate vice president for campus life.

The goal of the program is to create an inclusive community through shared experiences. The program works toward meeting well-defined learning outcomes by organizing events that foster skills such as critical thinking, effective communication and leadership, while also addressing issues of diversity, social justice and healthy living.

Professor and Chair of Chicano and Chicana Studies Magdalena Barrera is one of the faculty members working with the Chicanx/Latinx Student Success Center. A lot of the programming in the center is based on existing research on the strengths and challenges of historically underserved students.

“We directly help SJSU meet its goals of working on historically underrepresented students’ retention and graduation rates,” said Barrera. “Students find themselves empowered by engaging in the work at the center.”

She facilitates Centro’s Academic Resilience Series, which focuses on different aspects of student success, particularly geared toward Chicanx/Latinx students and first-generation student populations.

Along with Associate Professor and Faculty Fellow Rebeca Burciaga and CAPS counselor Celinda Miranda, Barrera co-facilitates a support group for students called CASA (Colectivo de Apoyo, Sabiduría y Acción, translated as Collective of Support, Knowledge and Action), an open forum for students to share personal challenges and also take part in structured conversations around issues they encounter daily.

Faculty fellows also engage in annual leadership retreats. Recently, Barrera was part of a team of staff and faculty members who took students to a retreat center in Santa Cruz, where students learned about being active members of the community.

“Everything we do in the center is founded on a model called community cultural wealth, where students don’t need to think of their ethnic identities as separate from their academic student identity,” said Barrera.

MOSAIC Cross Cultural Center is another vibrant space for the thriving Spartan community. This fall, the center held talks on multi-ethnic identity, including hosting events for Native American History month, a Fast Fashion Awareness art show and a variety of open mic activities. Since MOSAIC structures most of its cultural programming on ethnic events, the center is a space to support Spartan talent and local performers.

The programs offered by MOSAIC focus on social justice issues so students can learn about the rich cultural and social heritages of historically underrepresented groups, while celebrating differences.

Associate Professor of Justice Studies Edith Kinney is in her second year as a faculty fellow with MOSAIC. She feels that the center is a great space on campus for students of diverse backgrounds and interests to come together. “As a white faculty member, I think it’s really important to engage our students of color and to work actively against racism,” Kinney said.

“The faculty fellows program is a critical way to connect the expertise, scholarship and passion of the faculty with the interests and needs of our students,” added Kinney.

Student Affairs Faculty Fellows for the current academic year include:

MOSAIC Cross Cultural Center

Edith Kinney
Lance M. Fung
Jonathan Fung

Student Conduct and Ethical Development

Sarika Pruthi

Pride Center

Lark Buckingham

Gender Equity Center

Nico Peck

Chicanx/Latinx Student Success Center

Magdalena Barrera
Rebeca Burciaga

Military and Veteran Student Resource Center

Leonard Lira

UndocuSpartan Student Resource Center

Julia Curry

African-American/Black Student Success Center

Nikki Yeboah

San Jose State Celebrates CommUniverCity’s 15th Anniversary

CommUniverCity partners and participants gather for the 15th anniversary celebration. Photo by Brandon Chew.

SJSU’s student mariachi group. Photo by Brandon Chew.

San Jose, Calif. — San Jose State University’s student mariachi group opened CommUniverCity’s Celebrating Partnerships: A Quinceañera on Wednesday, November 13 in the Diaz Compean Student Union Ballroom. The event highlighted CommUniverCity’s 15 years of work to create healthy and vibrant neighborhoods through a unique partnership between underserved communities in central San Jose, San Jose State and the city of San Jose.

“CommUniverCity has come a long way over the past 15 years. We are fortunate to have trusted neighborhood leaders, collaborative city of San Jose staff, and engaged SJSU faculty members and students,” said CommUniverCity SJSU Executive Director Katherine Kao Cushing. “Our collaboration is the strongest it’s ever been and we can’t wait to see what the next 15 years have in store for us.”

More than 115,000 community members have engaged with more than 21,000 SJSU students in community-based projects. SJSU students alone have invested more than 394,000 hours in community service, valued at $8.4 million.

“Community engagement is a centerpiece of SJSU’s strategic plan, Transformation 2030,” said SJSU President Mary Papazian. “CommUniverCity’s work brings together dozens of SJSU faculty in departments ranging from materials engineering to urban planning, and this kind of interdisciplinary collaboration is critical to achieving our future goals.”

CommUniverCity received commendations from the city of San Jose, CA State Senator’s Jim Beall and U.S. House of Representative Zoe Lofgren’s Office. San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo learned of CommUniverCity as a city council member. He said it is a model for bringing the classroom out into the community.

“I’m honored to be here to celebrate 15 years of partnership,” said Liccardo. “As long as I’m around, I want to do all we can to cultivate this incredible partnership.”

SJSU Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education Thalia Anagnos presented CommUniverCity’s awards to partners and community members. The Golden Brick award was presented to Paul Pereira, senior policy advisor for the San Jose Mayor’s Office. The Community Partner Award was presented to Jaime Torres, CORAL site manager at Olinder Elementary School. And the Government Partner Award was given to the city of San Jose’s Housing Department.

“The event was a powerful evidence that town-gown collaboration can be transformative for cities and college students,” said Cushing. “Seeing elected officials at the municipal, regional, state and national levels all voice their support for the collaboration is a wonderful affirmation of the partnership’s positive impact in San Jose.”

San Jose State University Joins Amicus Brief in Support of DACA

Media Contacts:
Christine Hutchins, 408-924-1141, 650-644-9329, christine.hutchins@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, 408-799-3373, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

San Jose State University joined over 164 colleges and universities from across the country in signing an amicus brief supporting the approximately 700,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children and who hold Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This “friend of the court” brief in the case before the Supreme Court can be viewed and downloaded at this link: bit.ly/DACAAmicus.

Two years ago, on September 5, 2017, the administration rescinded DACA, an initiative that provides work permits and protection from deportation for undocumented students, often known as “Dreamers.” Oral arguments on this rescission will be held at the Supreme Court on November 12. The court could hand down a ruling as soon as February 2020, determining if Dreamers will lose the ability to live, study and work in the United States.

SJSU joined this “friend of the court” brief because the university believes that it is important to publicly show its unwavering support for DACA and immigrant students. 

“San Jose State is proud to be one of the most diverse campus communities in the nation, and it is a distinction that sets us apart from other public universities,” said SJSU President Mary A. Papazian. “We will continue to invest in the success of all of our students. The continued existence of DACA is essential, and this support affirms our values of inclusion, equity, respect and diversity of all cultures and people.”

SJSU encourages all eligible students and employees who have less than one year left of their DACA to submit their renewal application immediately. SJSU and CSU have many support services for DACA recipients, undocumented students and alumni in the campus community.

Support Services:

Diversity and inclusion are core values of San Jose State University and the California State University system. SJSU will continue to support DACA students and employees. The university will make every effort to provide a safe and welcoming campus environment for all students, faculty, staff, alumni and members of the campus community.

 

Campus Message on Information Regarding Possible PG&E Power Shutoff Oct. 29–30

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on October 28, 2019 at 12:02 p.m. from President Mary A. Papazian. We will post updates on this web page as new information becomes available.

Dear Campus Community,

Today, the SJSU campus is open.

Last Thursday, October 24, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) announced a Public Safety Power Shutoff event (PSPS) due to weather conditions including gusty winds and dry conditions that created a heightened fire risk which impacted a number of counties and residents living in their respective cities. Due to the next anticipated extreme wind event from Tuesday, October 29 through Wednesday, October 30, PG&E may be issuing another PSPS. You can check PG&E’s potential PSPS outage maps in advance to see if the power will be shut off at your home or a family member’s home. 

For faculty and staff, if you live in an area impacted by last week’s power outage, contact your supervisor if you are not able to make it to work. If you need to take time off during this impacted period, your time away will not be charged against your personal, vacation, or sick leave time. 

For faculty, who might have students affected, please provide them with flexible alternatives to continue to move forward in the class even if they can’t be in attendance. 

For students who live in an impacted area, please contact your professors right away so that they understand your situation.

San Jose State University is closely monitoring weather alerts and advisories from PG&E and will notify you if our campus will be affected. Please continue to check the following SJSU channels for updates: 

In the case of an emergency, Alert SJSU is utilized for timely, campus alert notifications. Faculty and staff must enroll through their My SJSU account. We strongly urge you to review your contact information by logging onto your “My SJSU” account and clicking on the Alert SJSU tab. Students are automatically enrolled. If you are not receiving Alert SJSU, please check with your cell phone provider. For more information: Alert SJSU

Lastly, as a reminder, here are things you can do to prepare for an outage and during an outage: PG&E Preparation Steps

Additional resources:

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SJSU and IBM Announce New Collaboration—First of its Kind on the West Coast

Preparing Students for high tech jobs of the future

Photo by Francisco Mendoza, ’21 Photography/San Jose State University

On October 18, 2019, San Jose State University and IBM announced a strategic collaboration designed to provide today’s students with advanced skills needed for high tech jobs of the future.

The use of emerging technologies such as the Internet of things, cloud computing, artificial intelligence (AI), data science, security, and blockchain are growing. AI is expected to contribute $15.7T to the global economy by 2030* as the U.S. skills gap widens. Over 11.5 million workers in the United States alone may need to be retrained or reskilled as a result of AI and intelligent automation alone in the next three years.**

“It makes perfect sense for Silicon Valley’s public university to collaborate with IBM, a giant in the tech world,” said San Jose State University President Mary A. Papazian. “Growing our research and scholarship is a priority of ours and ties directly to our student success goals. This collaboration will help San Jose State students gain the skills they need to compete in tomorrow’s workforce, and it will solidify SJSU as the top provider of talent to Silicon Valley companies.”    

The strategic skills-based collaboration, the first of its kind on the west coast, will feature three key components on campus: IBM Academic Initiative, SJSU Technology Office, and IBM Skills Academy.  

  • IBM Academic Initiative. IBM will provide a unique, customized portal for SJSU students, staff, and faculty to access IBM Academic Initiatives resources for teaching and research purposes. The Academic Initiative also provides faculty and researchers with IBM’s cloud technology and software in fast-growing fields such as AI, blockchain, cybersecurity, data science, high-performance computing, and quantum computing. 
  • SJSU Technology Office. IBM will help SJSU establish a technology office to support faculty research, student growth, and campus-wide innovation through regular workshops and training. A cybersecurity training center will also be developed and located on the SJSU campus in the future.
  • IBM Skills Academy. This Skills Academy will offer practical curriculum, learning tools, and labs created by IBM subject experts. Courses will cover a variety of advanced skills, and SJSU’s Information Technology department will evaluate pilot programs in data science, AI, data engineering and cybersecurity. IBM’s new AI tools and related education initiatives are drawn from methods and technologies IBM developed in-house to drive its own workforce transformation. The IBM Skills Academy transforms how cultures and people will operate with digital technology including ethics and human bias in coding.

“Skills are the most important issue of our time and we need to fully equip students with the right skills to participate in the digital economy,” said Naguib Attia, vice president, IBM Global University Programs. “Through this new collaboration, we will work closely with San Jose State University to ensure curricula aligns with industry needs and trends so both students and faculty can earn digital badges and develop the skills they need today, for the jobs of tomorrow.”

The collaboration between San Jose State University and IBM takes effect immediately.

**PwC’s Global Artificial Intelligence Study: Exploiting the AI Revolution

**IBM Institute of Business Value, “The Enterprise Guide to Closing the Skills Gap”, September 2019.

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Update: Campus Food Eateries Gradually Re-opening – October 10, 2019

Campus Message on food eateries at Diaz Compean Student Union on Oct. 10


Editor’s note: The following update was posted on October 10, 2019, at 1:15 p.m.

As Facilities, Development and Operations (FDO) has been able to quickly address unexpected facilities maintenance at the Diaz Compean Student Union today, hot food items are gradually re-opening at this time in the following sequence

  • Panda Express
  • Steak ‘n Shake
  • Taco Bell
  • Japanese Kitchen 

Alternative Options Remain the Same: The following eateries also continue to be open at this time:

  • The Commons dining hall (between Washburn and Joe West Hall)
    • For today, there is a special promotion of an “All You Care To Eat” buffet for $7 per person. 
  • Paseo Fresh (Student Union)
  • Student Union Market (Student Union)
  • Starbucks (Student Union)
  • Subway (Student Union)
  • Tea Degree (Student Union)
  • Jamba Juice (Student Union)
  • Fresh on Fourth (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library)
  • Village Market (Campus Village Building B)
    • Options include pizza, chicken strips, and a variety of grab-n-go items. 
  • Ginger Market  (MacQuarrie Hall)
    • Options include sushi and banh mi sandwiches

We will continue to provide updates when additional information is available.


Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on October 10, 2019  at 12:02 p.m. from Charlie Faas, vice president of administration and finance. 

Dear Campus Community,

Due to unexpected facilities maintenance at the Diaz Compean Student Union today, hot food items cannot be offered. The following eateries will be closed until further notice

  • Panda Express
  • Steak ‘n Shake
  • Taco Bell
  • Japanese Kitchen 

Alternative Options: The following eateries will remain open at this time:

  • The Commons Dining Hall (between Washburn and Joe West Hall)
    • For today, there is a special promotion of an “All You Care To Eat” buffet for $7 per person
  • Paseo Fresh (Student Union)
  • Student Union Market (Student Union)
  • Starbucks (Student Union)
  • Subway (Student Union)
  • Tea Degree (Student Union)
  • Jamba Juice (Student Union)
  • Fresh on Fourth (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library)
  • Village Market (Campus Village Building B)
    • Options include pizza, chicken strips and a variety of grab-n-go items
  • Ginger Market  (MacQuarrie Hall)
    • Options include sushi and banh mi sandwiches

We will provide updates when additional information is available.

SJSU Cares Housing and Homeless Resources Explained

Photo: Brandon Chew, ’18 Photojournalism/ San Jose State University

Media Contacts:
Christine Hutchins, 408-924-1141, 650-644-9329, christine.hutchins@sjsu.edu
Robin McElhatton, 408-924-1749, 408-799-3373, robin.mcelhatton@sjsu.edu

SJSU Cares Housing and Homeless Resources Explained

100 Percent of SJSU Students Who Requested Housing and Homeless Resources and Remained Engaged with SJSU Cares Received Assistance

SAN JOSE, CA–Housing insecurity is a nationwide crisis affecting too many college students. A complex issue that is often interconnected with other concerns, including economic hardship, it can range from short-term to ongoing need.

To add to this complex issue, “housing insecurity” can be described as a spectrum. Housing insecurity could mean a student sleeps on her friend’s couch before the semester starts, a family that has been displaced by a landlord selling its property, or a person with longer-term needs related to job loss, divorce or separation, illness, addiction or mental health issues.

At San Jose State University, SJSU Cares was established as a resource and service to assist students who are confronted with situations and issues outside of the classroom that may negatively impact their academic success. Some of those services include housing/homeless resources, food insecurity, mentoring, counseling, health and wellness, and public safety assistance. There is a range of housing/homeless resources, including temporary emergency housing, financial assistance for housing, assistance with landlord issues and help to search for an apartment.

Not every student who is in need of temporary emergency housing wants or seeks on-campus living assistance. Temporary emergency housing assistance is not approached as a “one size fits all” service model. Every student matters and each student has unique housing needs. SJSU Cares begins services by assessing each student’s unique needs to understand the best approach toward sustainable housing and a comprehensive solution—rather than providing just “a bed.” It’s important to note that not all students facing housing insecurity utilize SJSU Cares. Many seek other resources outside of the university.

During the 2018-19 academic year, SJSU Cares received requests for various types of assistance from 189 students. Forty-four percent of the 189 SJSU Cares requests were for housing/homeless resources.

In each of these cases, SJSU Cares responses were aligned with the unique needs of students, as there is no single, uniform response to housing assistance needs. In cases when a student has revealed historical and ongoing financial hardships that affect their housing needs, SJSU Cares has provided solutions that involve more comprehensive interventions. The goal is to ensure students gain the necessary skills and resources to develop financial self-sufficiency and resilience.

By the Numbers

Among the actual services provided to the 189 students who contacted SJSU Cares during the 2018-19 academic year:

  • 53 students were granted additional financial aid grants through SJSU Cares with an average award amount of $1,107.
  • 21 students were awarded financial aid loans through SJSU Cares and 12 students accepted an average loan amount of $3,329.
  • 18 students were granted emergency assistance funds with an average award amount of $789.
  • 6 students received temporary emergency housing on campus with an average stay of 17.8 days.

In spring 2019, President Papazian stated that any student who is in need of temporary housing will not be turned away.

However, not every student who contacted SJSU Cares accepted services or resources. SJSU Cares strives for housing stability based on each student’s unique needs and their personal decision to utilize the services or resources offered. While SJSU Cares delivered temporary housing to some students based on immediate, short-term needs, they worked with other students to arrange loans or grants in an effort to facilitate long-term financial and housing stability.

Going Forward

As SJSU comes to understand the emergent challenges of student housing insecurity, the university is continually scaling its services and housing resources and is working to deliver those services as quickly as possible. The university also is expanding promotion of SJSU Cares so students are aware of it.

Anyone affiliated with SJSU who recognizes that a student is experiencing housing insecurity or other forms of economic crisis is encouraged to contact SJSU Cares directly by email at economiccrisis@sjsu.edu or by filling out the Request for Assistance online form. The SJSU Cares team is committed to taking a comprehensive approach to resolving students’ economic crises while building their financial efficacy and resilience.


About San Jose State University

The founding campus of the 23-campus California State University system, San Jose State provides a comprehensive university education, granting bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 145 areas of study with an additional 108 concentrations — offered through its eight colleges.

With approximately 36,000 students and nearly 4,370 employees, San Jose State University continues to be an essential partner in the economic, cultural and social development of Silicon Valley and the state, annually contributing more than 7,000 graduates to the workforce.

The university is immensely proud of the accomplishments of its more than 220,000 alumni, 60 percent of whom live and work in the Bay Area.

Vigil for Tree of Life Synagogue

Photo: Muhamed Causevic

Dear campus community,

The SJSU Jewish Student Union, Students Supporting Israel, AEPi, Chabad of SJSU, and Hillel of Silicon Valley will be holding a vigil for the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh this evening at the César Chávez Arch by the Diaz Compean Student Union.

The vigil is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The entire campus community is invited to attend.

 

 

President’s Message on Campus Safety

Editor’s note: The following message was emailed to all students, faculty and staff on August 23, 2018.

Dear All,

I want to update you on an incident that occurred near campus yesterday involving one of our students.  As Alert SJSU subscribers know, a student reported he was held at gunpoint and forced to withdraw cash from several ATM machines. The ordeal began at the 7-Eleven store on East San Salvador Street. The suspect has been described as a male in his twenties with a dark complexion and hair dyed yellow. He was wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, black sweat pants with a white stripe, and a JAMZ-brand gray backpack.

The student returned to his residence, where his roommate suggested he call police. I would like to commend both individuals for enabling the San Jose Police Department to launch an investigation immediately, with assistance from the University Police Department. The suspect remains at large. Anyone with tips or information is asked to contact SJPD’s robbery unit at 408-277-4166 or UPD at 408-924-2222.

In the meantime, our Student Affairs team has been in contact with the student, who is understandably shaken but otherwise physically unharmed. I know this report has left many of you shaken as well, whether you are a student or a faculty member or a staff member. UPD is asking all of us to remain on alert and aware of our surroundings. Confronted with a similar situation, police urge us to call 9-1-1 and leave the line open.

We are committed to keeping you safe and informed. This is why we frequently send Alert SJSU messages. We recently installed additional indoor and outdoor security cameras on both the main and south campuses. As classes begin this fall, you should see increased police presence on and around SJSU.

So please, be sure to report all crimes to the police, use our blue light phones and connect with our safety escort program.

Sincerely,

Dr. Mary A. Papazian, President

Our Crazy Winter Weather

Our Crazy Winter Weather

Spartans have had few opportunities to break out their umbrellas this year, unlike back in 2009, when storms pelted campus (Stefan Armijo photo).

Still nearly no rain in San Jose! Meanwhile, storms have socked the rest of the country. What gives?

Our Crazy Winter Weather

A weather map showing wind patterns worldwide, with the North Pole in the center. Note the ridge parked off the West Coast, resulting in just four inches of rain this year (SJSU Department of Meteorology and Climate Science).

The Polar Vortex hovering over the Midwest and East Coast is linked to a stubborn ridge parked off the West Coast, yielding mostly sunny skies here and record lows elsewhere, says Professor Alison Bridger, chair of the Department of Meteorology and Climate Science.

Why is this happening? Could it be global warming? Graduate students and faculty members here are studying  underlying factors.

This is an excellent example of applied weather research which would have direct applications to we citizens in that it would explain and demystify extreme weather phenomena,” Bridger writes.

Learn more from the California State University system’s only meteorology department.

 

Spartans at Work: Great America

(This summer, SJSU Today hit the road, visiting students and recent grads on the job at summer destinations throughout the Bay Area. Our 2013 Spartans at Work series begins with recreation alumnus Ryan Davies.)

Taking clients on Gold Striker, Great America’s newest ride, and pricing and promoting the amusement park’s Halloween Haunt are a few of the many projects Ryan Davies, ’07 Recreation, is working on this summer.

As group sales area manager, Davies develops print and sales collateral, coupon programs and signage for the park. He also oversees corporate accounts, the call center and the park’s ticketing system.

“My favorite part about my job is that I get to get out from behind my desk and go into the park and see people have fun,” Davies said.

Davies started in 2003 as a ride operator for Xtreme Skyflyer and worked his way up to seasonal managerial roles. Once he graduated from SJSU, his bosses suggested he interview for an administrative role.

This summer, Davies is helping market the new Gold Striker, Northern California’s tallest and fastest wooden roller coaster, standing 108 feet high and soaring at 53.7 MPH.

Davies’ time at Great America taught him about the ins and outs of the amusement park industry and about his potential.

“I just try to push myself to the next level and try to learn everything I can,” Davies said.

A recently added marketing role is helping him grow professionally.

“It’s really important that you work somewhere you want to be and you enjoy what you do,” Davies said.

As an SJSU student, Davies learned about time management and multitasking. He encourages students to take advantage of opportunities made available to students and to get involved on campus.

“I truly attribute where I am to some of the activities I joined,” Davies said.

 

SJSU Statement: Campus Safety


San Jose State University has released the following statement:

“SJSU cares about and is firmly committed to providing a safe environment for everyone in the campus community. We strive to implement timely and appropriate actions to protect our community members, including promptly, carefully and thoroughly investigating all complaints, followed by appropriate responses and actions. If there is any reason to believe a crime has occurred or safety is at risk, the University Police Department is contacted and, as appropriate, the matter is referred to the Santa Clara County District Attorney.”

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