Conference Discovery Session: Integrating 360 Content With Instruction

Bethany presenting at table

As I’ve mentioned in a previous post, winter is generally a good time for eCampus staff to focus on their own professional development.  I was delighted to be able to attend the Online Learning Consortium’s Accelerate 2018 Conference in Orlando, Florida. This was my first time at this enormous national convention and it was a whirlwind of learning and networking! There were over 500 presenters, and I was fortunate to be among those chosen to do a table-top interactive presentation. My topic was on Integrating 360 Content with Instruction, and for 45 minutes I went through some of the basic concepts, terminology, possibilities and pitfalls of using Canvas to share 360 content.

I had several mobile devices, two tablets, a couple Samsung phones, a Samsung 360 gear camera, and two Samsung Gear360 headsets along with a Google Cardboard, so that participants could view 360 content in multiple ways.  I also created a public Canvas course, Integrating 360 with Instruction!, participants could access via a QR code or bit.ly link so that participants could see how the content could be presented in Canvas. In particular, I strongly encouraged them to visit the course on multiple devices, just like their students would, to really get a feel for the challenges and opportunities this kind of technology presents.

I also attended many excellent lectures and discussions with my peers from all over the country. I took a lot of notes that I shared with my eCampus team, and I look forward to sharing what I’ve learned with faculty!

The Future Present: Rockcliffe University Consortium Conference November 2018

Winter for eCampus staff is a great time to catch up on our own professional development, and earlier this month I had the opportunity to attend this conference in San Francisco with a variety of participants who are involved using virtual worlds in education. One the best things about this conference was the smaller size compared to other ones I’ve attended. It was interactive too, we use a conference app to communicate and a communal Padlet for reflection on the sessions. Basically, it was like a two day breakout session with passionate and creative educational professionals, and I got to meet and network with old friends and new!

I was delighted to be able to finally meet (in-person) my mentor and the Director of the Community Virtual Library, Dr. Valerie Hill. I also got to meet the CVL’s Co-Director, Alyce Dunavant-Jones who just graduated from SJSU’s MLIS program that is also connected with CVL. (In fact, Alyce also posted about the event at the SJSU School of Information blog.)  I met Val and Alyce last year at the OpenSim Community Conference and I’m delighted to be co-presenting with Val for the same conference next week!

In addition to learning from a variety of different sessions, I loved getting to know some of the amazing instructional design team from University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. I also got the chance to  meet and extensively mingle with the leadership of Rockcliffe University Consortium who sponsor many of the conferences related to virtual worlds and education. As with Valerie and Alyce, some of these people I’ve met in-world at one event or another, and meeting in-person was just like meeting an old friend!

I also met Renne Emiko Brock who teaches multimedia studies at Peninsula College in Washington and we immediately “clicked”. She has worked with Valerie before, and I’ve seen her present in-world on several occasions. I immediately recognized her because she looks the same as her avatar! Before the group dinner together on the second night, Renne, Val, and I began talking about me making a visit to Washington this summer to visit both of them, and for the three of us to co-present on our overlapping projects at one or more conferences in 2019. So here’s to the authenticity of in-world relationships, and some exciting times ahead in virtual worlds and education!

NEW! Excelsior OWL: Online Lab for Developing Reading & Writing Skills

The Excelsior Online Writing Lab (OWL) makes it’s debut at San Jose State University fall 2018 semester.  The Excelsior OWL is a replacement for Writer’s Help, it’s a free, open educational resource that is easy to use and mobile friendly! This powerful online tool is an excellent resource that instructors can freely share with their students so that they can get the help they need to improve their reading and writing skills. Students can also go directly to Excelsior OWL on their own, no account is necessary. 

Reading & Writing Support

The Excelsior OWL if chock full of engaging college level interactive content on a variety of topics.There are actual two distinct areas of Excelsior OWL, the Online Reading Lab and the Online Writing Lab. Both are easy to navigate, and the search feature returns targeted and more relevant  results than searching in Google.

Customization Options

Instructors might be interested in several other exciting options that let them integrate Excelsior OWL content with their own curriculum. The link below takes you to a page that shows you how to get the HTML embed code of over one hundred writing activities and almost two hundred interactive reading activities. Once you have the embed code, you easily add it to your own page in Canvas. Your students will be able to see and interact with that content without ever leaving your Canvas course.

Instructors who want to create free accounts are able to gather whatever instructional content they like from Excelsior OWL and organize it into a larger customized lesson called an “Owlet”.

Check out the video below and explore the Excelsior OWL today!

Excelsior OWL from eCampus on Vimeo.

Tech Tip Tuesday: Piazza Brunch-n-Learn Event!

Piazza Event image

How much do you know about Piazza, the robust wiki-style Q & A platform that helps boost  participation of women and minorities in STEM and other disciplines? If you’re not familiar with it this is a great opportunity to meet representatives who will be on hand for a demo, and hear from a panel of SJSU faculty who use and recommend Piazza. This platform helps boost the participation of women and minorities, in STEM and other disciplines!

Read about how the founder was inspired to create Piazza when she was one of only three women in her computer science program, and “…dreamed of a way to empower all students, shy or outgoing, male or female, to benefit from the power of collaborative learning.” (She was awarded 2016 Women Of Vision ABIE Award Winner for Technical Entrepreneurship.) The platform is certainly not limited to STEM fields. Anytime your students would benefit for collaboration, look to Piazza for features that go far beyond what you can do with Canvas discussion boards. For example, here’s a real psychology course on Piazza.

Register Today!

  • WHEN? – Friday October 26th, 10am-12pm
  • WHERE? – SJSU Student Union, Meeting Room 2B
  • Click Here To Register!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Camtasia!

Recent research indicates that students really value recorded lectures to supplement their learning, and videos can stand in for you when you are NOT face to face with your students. It’s also easier than ever to get started with video development, with Camtasia! From a quick motivational talking-head style pep talk, a screen-cast showing a software application, to a narrated PowerPoint with additional images and effects, Camtasia is a robust program that lets you do it all.

In fact, there’s still room in the two beginner workshops scheduled for tomorrow, September 26th, at 9 and 10am. Don’t hesitate to get in on the fun, email bethany.winslow@sjsu.edu to join one or both workshops!

(NOTE: Camtasia is available for SJSU faculty and staff only. For students interested in video check out your options with Adobe!)