September 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album and video

From 1850 to 1910, livery stables, harness makers, blacksmiths and wagon builders were essential to transportation and commerce in virtually every California town.  In the September 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album retired Anthropology Professor Tom Layton presents an illustrated tour through the Equine Era of “horse power” to its replacement by the “horsepower” of the automobile.

The September 2018 Sourisseau Academy news video explores the elegant, engraved graphics that graced the letterheads of San José merchants during the same years as the “Equine Era.”

August 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album and video

The late 19th century was a Golden Age for San José engravers. In the August 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album retired Anthropology Professor Tom Layton takes readers on a guided tour through half a century of exuberant letterheads from local printers.

The August 2018 Sourisseau Academy news video pays tribute to a century of working women, whose labor was essential to the growth of commerce in the Santa Clara Valley.

July 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album and video

Despite the pervasive myth of the “stay at home” wife and mother, working women have been a mainstay of the Santa Clara Valley workforce for well over a century. In the July 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album retired Anthropology Professor Tom Layton celebrates this unsung labor force of cannery workers, telephone operators and clerks — not to mention the entrepreneurial founders of the Women’s Fruit Preserving Association, whose 1890s Honeysuckle Brand labels graced fruit cans from coast to coast.

In the July 2018 Sourisseau Academy news video Professor Layton tours the ceremonial gates, arches, and banners of the Santa Clara Valley orchards of yesteryear.

May 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album and video

Half a century ago many of our elders complained that the garish in-your-face signage flashing along our main streets had become a public blight. The resulting sign ordinances limiting the size and placement of signs was a nail in the coffin of the Age of Neon. In the May 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album San José historian Heather David (leader of the San José Signs Project) tells the story of signage in San José.

In the May 2018 Sourisseau Academy news video Michael Pearce explores San Jose’s floods and the reservoirs designed to prevent them.

March 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album and video

The New Almaden Mining Historic District takes its name from the Almaden mercury mines in Spain. Originally developed by the Romans, they were renamed by the Eighth Century Islamic conquerors of Spain and called “Al Madan” (The Mine). The name survived for well over a thousand years and was reused when mercury was discovered in California. In the March 2018 Sourisseau Academy photo album Sourisseau Board Member and Anthropology Professor Charlotte Sunseri explores the history of New Almaden, from the California Gold Rush to the early Twentieth Century.

The New Almaden Quicksilver Mine brought technical expertise from around the world. Miners came from Mexico, from Chile, and from as far away as Cornwall. In the March 2018 Sourisseau Academy news video Ralph Pearce details the story of the tremendous growth of the ethnic diversity of the Santa Clara Valley’s populace during the decades of quicksilver production at New Almaden.