Hospitality Management Students Host Fall 2015 Beers Around the World Trade Show

Hospitality Management students pose for a group picture with their booth representing Mexico.

Hospitality Management students pose for a group picture with their booth representing Mexico.

San José State University (SJSU) students from the department of Hospitality Management (HSPM) hosted a Beers Around the World Trade show at The Glasshouse in downtown San José on November 13. The event was open to SJSU faculty, staff and students along with invited guests over the age of 21. Guests paid $5 for admission and tickets for tasting of beer samples. Additional beverages and food were also available for purchase during the event. All proceeds went to charity.

Students enrolled in HSPM 149, Beer Appreciation and HSPM 140, Meetings and Event Management planned and participated in the trade show. Beer Appreciation students worked in teams to fill the venue with decorated booths representing their assigned brewing region or country with at least two or more beer samples and food pairings for guests to taste. Event Management students planned the event and coordinated guest check in and concessions.

Carly Comer, a Hospitality Management student, worked with a group of fellow students from the HSPM 140 class to seek awards for the winners of the trade show. Comer said the class taught her how to work with companies to get sponsorships and donations.

Carly Comer, far left, and her HSPM group members outreached to several companies for sponsorships and donations for the Beer Tradeshow event.

Carly Comer, far left, and her Meetings and Event Management group members outreached to several companies for sponsorships and donations for the event.

“We reached out to different breweries in San José and Santa Cruz and were able to get prizes and beer donations,” said Comer about obtaining gifts that would be appealing to winners.

Comer’s group were also in charge of recording votes with an iPad in order to nominate beer presenters with the people’s choice award as guests exited the event.

Beer presenters competed with each other for judges’ choice and people’s choice award based on different criteria for each. Judges’ choice awards recognized the booths with the best beer and food pairing and best overall appearance, energy, tasting and knowledge. People’s Choice awards recognized the best apparel, most creative, and people’s favorite.

Students talk with guests about beer from Japan and offered sushi to pair with a variety of beer.

Students talk with guests about beer from Japan and offered sushi to pair with a variety of beer.

Beer Appreciation students representing Canada paired beer with tiramisu, beef summer sausage and salty blue cheese. The group listed specific beers to go best with each type of food.

Beer Appreciation students representing Canada paired beer with tiramisu, beef summer sausage and salty blue cheese. The group listed specific beers to go best with each type of food.

Every group received shot glasses, Redbull drinks, and 4 Wildcide Gordon Biersch Hard Cider.

Ruben Cardenas, a Justice Studies student, took the Beer Appreciation class because he wanted to gain more knowledge of beer. “I love beer, but I wanted to know the process of making it and how to truly appreciate beer rather than just drinking it,” he said.

Cardenas and his fellow students presented a booth representing the state of Washington. The group featured Olympia, Rainier, Red Hook Pumpkin Porter beer and Seattle Cider that was paired with sliced apples, lemon cakes and pizza. Each guest that visited their booth were given a lesson on the history of each beer and how it is made while being served.

“Coming here and taking what we learned in class and to put it in action is what this project really means to me,” Cardenas said. He learned about how the water source in Washington was proven to be natures best to brew beer with and that Seattle is the main brewing hub in the state.

Associate Dean Pam Richardson, left, and Dean Schutten, middle, poses with Ruben Cardenas who represented the state of Washington.

Associate Dean Pam Richardson, left, and Dean Schutten, middle, pose with Ruben Cardenas who represented the state of Washington.

The event wrapped up the night with a break dance performance by members of the King Library Rockers. Guests surrounded the dance floor as each crew member took turns showing off their dance moves.

Christine Di Salvo and Richard Larson Awarded at Homecoming

Christine Di Salvo, a Journalism and Mass Communications lecturer and Richard Larson, a Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging and Hospitality Management lecturer in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts at San José State University (SJSU) earned the Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) Faculty Award by the SJSU Quarterback Club. Voted by student athletes of SJSU for their exemplary service and dedication to educating Spartan student athletes. Both were celebrated on the football field during halftime at the Homecoming game on Saturday, October 17, 2015 against San Diego State University.

Congratulations to Richard and Christine!

Christine Di Salvo received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

Christine Di Salvo received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

Richard Larson received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

Richard Larson received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

SJSU students stay busy at week-long Pebble Beach tournament

During an unseasonably warm week in Carmel, 35 San José State University students were working hard to keep up with long lines at concession stands and meeting the needs of corporate clients at the 2015 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. The hand-selected students undergo an intense training process, with managers from the beach-side resort in preparation of their week-long program as part of the Special Event Management Team course. But most of the students agreed that nothing quite prepared them for what it would be like to work the tournament.

As part of the Special Event Management Team, the students receive course credit for the time they spend in training and working at Pebble Beach. The SJSU program allows students in hospitality management and kinesiology programs in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts as well as some business majors from the Lucas College and Graduate School of Business to work as interns for a week during the prestigious golf tournament, which will be finish up on Feb. 15. The university has maintained the partnership with Pebble Beach Company for 10 years. Hospitality Management Professor Rich Larson helped to oversee the program, coordinating training, accommodations and serving as an on-site mentor during the tournament.

“Until today, I had no idea what it would really be like,” said Kelsey Castellano, a hospitality management student.

With blue skies along the coastal golf course and temperatures into the high 70s, many of the SJSU students kept on their bright blue Pebble Beach jackets that helped identify them as managers. The students donned white, long-sleeve shirts, ties and black pants. They were required to wear black shoes and most opted for a comfortable pair as they needed to be on their feet for 10-12 hours each day of the event. At least one student had resorted to using bandages on her heels to keep a new pair of shoes from rubbing on a blister.

Most of the students agreed the long hours and the tiredness at the end of the day was worth the experience.

Castellano’s first client had arrived for the Feb. 11 3M Celebrity Challenge, which drew crowds to watch a dozen celebrities play five holes for charity. Some of the well-known faces included actors Ray Romano, Josh Duhamel and Bob Murray; director Clint Eastwood; singers Clay Walker and Jake Owen; among others.

Castellano said she arrived at the Pebble Beach resort at 6 a.m. and she expected to work until 6 or 7 p.m. that night.

“I can take a break, but I’ll probably just eat what’s nearby,” she said, of a behind-the-scenes area where food is set up for a runner to bring up to the skyboxes for client consumption. A few shelves in the staging tent were set up with snacks for employees.

She said the best part for her so far had been the responsibility of overseeing a skybox for her corporate client.

“I’m in control of my staff,” she said. “They are asking me all the questions. Until today, I had no idea (what it would be like.)”

At mid-morning Castellano had managed a breakfast guaranteed for 60 guests and was preparing for a lunch for as many as 100 guests.

Marissa Giacomo, another hospitality management student, was busy managing a concession stand during the celebrity tournament as the five-hole play neared the 18th green. Her staff consisted of volunteers from the Carmel Youth Center that will receive 10 percent of the proceeds.

“Yesterday we were open, but today is our first full day,” she said, of the tent selling hot dogs, pulled pork sandwiches, snacks, soda, beer and a couple mixed drinks. “It feels good to know everyone has a job. I’m surprised at how open they are to doing things.”

She said she had learned quickly to delegate to her staff so she could focus on overall operations.

Alejandra Salceda, a hospitality management major, said she was still working with a client to make sure their skybox was set up to their liking before their guests arrived the following day for the official start of the tournament.

“It’s been really fun so far,” she said. “I’m just cleaning tables and counters – getting ready.”

She said she would be overseeing eight employees in two skyboxes.

While she had interned at the Fairmont Hotel in San Jose and had worked as a lead before, she said the Pebble Beach Special Event Management Team was unique.

“This is completely different,” Salceda said. “I am the manager.”

The experience is so positive that many students who have completed the internship come back to work as temporary managers again, including some who have graduated and are working full-time in the hospitality industry. Several SJSU graduates said they coordinated to take a week of vacation from their regular jobs to serve as temporary managers at the tournament.

Erin Paxton, a December 2014 hospitality management graduate, said she had taken some vacation time to work for a few days at the tournament. She was overseeing a hospitality suite in the Pebble Beach Lodge.

“It was my first big gig, my first big girl job,” she said, of the internship last year. “It was the best for learning to deal with clients and to see the event side with food, beverages, golf. It was a very well-rounded experience.”

In a tent below the skyboxes, several students worked to prepare their set up for the following morning. Jaclyn Kyllo pointed out the layout of the room, where tables and coolers were set up for each client skybox on the 18th hole.

“We send a runner down to pick up the food,” she said, noting that utensils and plates were also organized in the tent. “This is also a good place to debrief, if you are feeling stressed or need an answer.”

She said she didn’t realize some of the smaller tasks she would be involved in, such as polish silverware or building racks to hold supplies in the temporary tents.

“It’s more than I imagined,” she said. “But I want to see the sunset on Pebble Beach every night. We are all in it together – the (35) of us so it’s nice that they believe in us to handle it.”

Hospitality profs look to future of international travel in Vietnam

Dr. Tsu-Hong Yen, the chair of the San José State University Hospitality Management department, and Professor Kate Sullivan co-hosted a conference in Danang, Vietnam in December. The College of Applied Sciences and Arts department was invited to participate in the Duy Tan University Hospitality Management conference on the future of international tourism and hospitality in Danang.

Yen served as the keynote speaker at the event, with a lecture on leisure and entertainment city models while Sullivan spoke about customer service. University faculty from the Netherlands, Germany, Hungary, Canada and Vietnam were in attendance. More than 500 people attended in person, with parts of the conference airing on Vietnamese national television.

Following the conference, a city-wide press conference was held to announce that Danang had received Trip Advisor’s 2015 award for “Up and coming City in the World.” The online travel website allows users to post recommendations of places they have stayed in the United States and around the world as well as allow users to search for travel needs such as hotels, airfare and more.

Sullivan said she is hoping to return to Danang in March to continue to work on creating a partnership between SJSU and the universities there.

Emeritus and Retired Faculty lunch with current CASA affiliates

The College of Applied Sciences and Arts hosted its annual Emeritus and Retired Faculty Luncheon Oct. 29, at Flames Eatery and Banquet.
Emeritus and Retired

Faculty were invited to join Assistant Chair of Kinesiology Shirley Reekie and Associate Dean Greg Payne for a tour of some of the newly completed construction on campus. About a half dozen faculty members participated in the tour of the newly renovated Yoshihiro Uchida Hall and the new Student Union.

“This is one of our favorite events to host each year because it gives us a chance to catch you up on what has been going on in CASA and around campus and also for us to hear what you’ve done this past year,” said Interim Dean Alice Hines in her welcome.

The highlight of the program included three College of Applied Sciences and Arts students who attended summer study abroad programs who shared how the experience left a strong impression on them. The students speakers included Aly Mauro, an Occupational Therapy student, Mia Gonzalez, a Journalism and Mass Communications student and Michael Celso, a Social Work student. The students each received the Helen L. Stevens Faculty-Led Program Scholarship, helping to off-set $500 of the cost of the summer programs. The College is currently working to develop more scholarships to support study abroad opportunities for students.

Emeritus and retired faculty from seven CASA departments, including some that have merged with other departments, attended the luncheon with current faculty from nine of the departments offering updates on their activities. The attendees included a former dean and emeritus faculty member, Robert Moore, who taught in the Division of Technology. Moore, who is in his mid-90s, said he recalled hiring Helen Ross Mico, a retired Health Science professor in attendance, and Lee Walton, a retired kinesiology professor in attendance.