Accepting Applications for Faculty Led Programs Summer 2016

Get culture, get credit! The College of Applied Sciences and Arts’ Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging (NuFS) department are offering three different Faculty Led Programs (FLP) for summer 2016. Applications are being accepted now. This is a great opportunity for students to experience Hong Kong, Taiwan, or Puerto Rico all while earning 3-6 San José State University (SJSU) credits.

FLPs are short-term summer opportunities for students to travel abroad in order to study or participate in a service learning experience. SJSU faculty members organize this program to different parts of the world every summer. Scholarship opportunities are available throughout the year.

Hong KongFLP to Hong Kong, June 12 – 25, 2016 offers students 6 GE units:

  • NuFS 144i – Food Culture – Consuming Passions
  • NuFS 135i – Health Issues in a Multicultural Society

Example of activities:

  • Food exploration and food tasting adventures
  • Walking tours of Hong Kong’s diverse neighborhoods; learn about its colonial history and modern-day Chinese influence
  • Explore Hong Kong’s mega shopping culture
  • Learn about & experience traditional Chinese medicine
  • Join a host family for a home-cooked meal

Kasuen Mauldin, NuFS professor, and Van Ta, Health Science and Recreation associate professor, will co-lead the Hong Kong trip. For more information about Mauldin, Ta and the Hong Kong program visit FLP Hong Kong.

TaiwanFLP to Taiwan, June 13 – 23, 2016 offers students 3 GE units:

  • NuFS 115i – Issues in Food Toxicology

Example of activities:

  • Visit agricultural institute
  • Learn tea production and tea culture
  • Visit food processing factories in Taiwan
  • Experiencing Taiwanese culture

Irene Chou, NuFS profressor, will lead the Taiwan trip. For more information about Chou and the Taiwan program visit FLP Taiwan.

Puerto RicoFLP to Puerto Rico, June 14 – 28, offers 6 GE units:

  • NuFS 144i – Food and Culture: Consuming Passions
  • NuFS 139i – Hunger and Environmental Nutrition

Examples of activities:

  • El Yunque National Rainforest
  • Arecibo National Observatory
  • Bioluminescent Bay experience
  • Local open air markets
  • Organic coffee plantation tour
  • Artisanal cheese making

Deepa Singamsetti, NuFS lecturer, will lead the Puerto Rico trip. For more information about Singamesetti and the Puerto Rico program visit FLP Puerto Rico.

Find out what other FLP programs are offered by the College of Applied Sciences and Arts and apply today!

5th Annual CHAMP Senior Wellness Fair

CHAMP Senior Wellness Fair 2015

CHAMP Senior Wellness Fair 2015

The Timpany Center hosted the annual Senior Wellness Fair on October 24, 2015. The fair brought in over 500 attendees, with many students from San José State University’s (SJSU) College of Applied Sciences and Arts (CASA) volunteering to interact with the population.

The Senior Wellness Fair is a partnership between SJSU’s Center for Healthy Aging in Multicultural Populations (CHAMP), the Santa Clara County Department of Aging and Adult Services and the Timpany Center, now in its fifth year. CHAMP is an interdisciplinary effort that includes faculty from the School of Social Work, The Valley Foundation School of Nursing, Nutrition and Food Science, Kinesiology, Occupational Therapy as well as the departments of Psychology and Communicative Disorders and Sciences.

Sadhna Diwan, School of Social Work professor and director of CHAMP, said the fair offers SJSU students an opportunity to practice their communication skills, learn how to engage seniors in screenings and health education, and learn about the role of multiple disciplines and the array of community services available to promote wellness and healthy aging.

Students from the School of Social Work interacted with seniors using a poster board displaying facial expressions to identify mood change and depression. The students handed out community resource sheets and gave recommendations on how to seek help if some seniors are experiencing a low mood change.

Social Work graduate students volunteer at the Senior Wellness Fair on Oct. 24, 2015.

Social Work graduate students volunteer at the Senior Wellness Fair on Oct. 24, 2015.

Naomi Gomez, a social work graduate student, said she and her fellow students were there to educate seniors on mood changes that lead into depression in the aging population. “We are offering seniors today different support systems and referrals to help lift their moods or if they know of someone they can pass this useful information to,” said Gomez.

Don Tran, a public health graduate student, greeted seniors with his fellow students and provided body mass index screenings and blood pressure testing. Tran is working with the Pathways to American Indian and Alaska Native (PAAW) to introduce a diabetes prevention program. Tran said that the fair provides an opportunity to seek out potential participants to take part in the program that will provide participants with gym memberships, walking shoes, healthy meals and more.

“We are focused on improving health for American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander and all indigenous heritage population of Santa Clara County,” Tran said while handing out information packets to participants during the fair.

The Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging (NuFS) students provided information on food insecurities and healthy hydration methods. Kristian Ghazal, NuFS graduate student, said she volunteered to encourage seniors to buy local foods and where they can use CalFresh EBT cards.

Ghazal presented each visitor with an informational poster that highlighted healthy food options during each season of the year and reasons why the community should buy foods from local farmers. “Everyone attending the fair today should know where and how to get fresh foods from local farmers,” said Ghazal as she talked about the importance of seniors needing to maintain a healthy diet and supporting local farmers.

Kristian Ghazal, student volunteer, holds informational poster about local farmers and healthy seasonal foods.

Kristian Ghazal, student volunteer, holds informational poster about local farmers and healthy seasonal foods.

Susan Ross, Health Science and Recreation lecturer, and undergraduate students offered leisure interest screenings. Lovegifty Dudero, HSR undergraduate student, said she used the screening to talk with seniors about what they like to do on their free time. The results of the assessment identifies strengths and weaknesses of leisure activities such as physical, outdoor, mechanical, artistic, service, social, cultural and reading activities.

“From the results we can provide different leisure activities to help improve their weaknesses,” Dudero said, after finishing an assessment.

Lovegifty Dudero, student volunteer, administering a leisure screening with Senior Wellness Fair participant.

Lovegifty Dudero, student volunteer, administering a leisure screening with Senior Wellness Fair participant.

“Learning is one of the most life giving things a person can do,” said Ross, as she explained the goal of the student volunteers to teach people how to gain more novelty using the leisure screening. Other activities from NuFS included aging myths and aroma therapy.

An additional amount of students from SJSU volunteered their time to assist with various tasks at the fair. Desiree Barton, Daniela Zea and Chantelle Patel, School of Journalism and Mass Communications (JMC) undergraduate students, volunteered to take pictures of the event and interview seniors who attend.

“One of the most resourceful things for them is that everything is in one place and the free flu shots,” said Patel, after interviewing senior participants.

The JMC students plan to use the pictures and video interviews to create a video for CHAMP to spread awareness of the Senior Wellness Fair.

For more on CHAMP, click here.

 

Christine Di Salvo and Richard Larson Awarded at Homecoming

Christine Di Salvo, a Journalism and Mass Communications lecturer and Richard Larson, a Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging and Hospitality Management lecturer in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts at San José State University (SJSU) earned the Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) Faculty Award by the SJSU Quarterback Club. Voted by student athletes of SJSU for their exemplary service and dedication to educating Spartan student athletes. Both were celebrated on the football field during halftime at the Homecoming game on Saturday, October 17, 2015 against San Diego State University.

Congratulations to Richard and Christine!

Christine Di Salvo received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

Christine Di Salvo received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

Richard Larson received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

Richard Larson received the SAAC Faculty Award from the SJSU Quarterback Club during the Homecoming football game.

Nutrition Prof earns Outstanding Dietetics Educator Award

Kasuen Mauldin

Kasuen Mauldin

San José State University Nutrition Professor Kasuen Mauldin has received an Outstanding Dietetics Educator Award from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the United States’ largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. She was nominated by her peers and students in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging Department for this honor, which is given to recognize the teaching, mentoring and leadership activities of faculty in Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics-accredited programs. The award will be presented at the Nutrition and Dietetics Educators and Preceptors (NDEP) Area 1 meeting at Asilomar Conference Center on March 15. A list of awardees will be published in the September 2015 issue of the “Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics” and in the Spring 2015 issue of NDEP-Line, a newsletter for academy members. In addition, she will be recognized at the Fall 2015 Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo meeting in Nashville, TN.

Mauldin joined the Department of Nutrition, Food Science, and Packaging in 2011 and teaches a variety of courses at all levels, from introduction to nutrition for health professional majors to human nutrition laboratory to advanced nutrition and metabolism at the graduate level. As a productive researcher, Mauldin mentors many graduate students, helping them achieve success through scholarships, research awards, and peer-reviewed publications and presentations. She said she is excited to lead in the creation of new courses and development of faculty-led programs abroad as a part of her department’s current efforts to advance its curriculum. Her teaching philosophy is that “effective educators are organized and prepared, professional and fair, resourceful and well connected, and believe there is always room for improvement.”

CASA students get in the holiday spirit

Members of the College of Applied Sciences and Arts Student Affairs Committee got into the holiday spirit before Thanksgiving when they decorated a tree for Christmas in the Park. The community trees will be on display at downtown San Jose’s Christmas in the Park through Jan. 1.

Members of the College of Applied Sciences and Arts' Student Affairs community decorated a tree for Christmas in the Park.

Members of the College of Applied Sciences and Arts’ Student Affairs community decorated a tree for Christmas in the Park.

Christie Martinez, the president of the 2014-15 Student Affairs committee, said the group came up with the idea as a way to be social with other departments and within the committee – one representative is assigned to serve each year from each of the 11 departments and schools in CASA.

Some of the volunteers who helped to decorate the tree included: Claudia Gonzalez, of Health Science and Recreation, Martinez, of Justice Studies, Valerie Ruiz, of Kinesiology, Rebecca Robinson, of the Valley Foundation School of Nursing, Becky Ringer, of Nutrition, Food Science and Packaging, Sara Wykoff, of Occupational Therapy, OT Professor Gigi Smith, and David Hoffman, of Social Work.

The tree is one of many decorated by community groups for the annual Christmas in the Park event, which is open and free to the public from the end of November through Jan. 1.

“We all decided at our committee meeting that our tree would represent all 11 departments within the college,” Martinez said, via email.

Each committee member was asked to collect or make ornaments that represent the students or staff of the department. Many of the decorations include the name or abbreviation for the department, with some coming up with unique ideas such as a tree skirt made of copies of the Spartan Daily to represent the School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

“My favorite part was trying to find ideas to make the ornaments and also asking for my department’s help with ideas,” Martinez said.

Wykoff said her favorite part was seeing how unique each tree looked.

“Ours is so neat because of the variety of programs that it represents,” she said.

Martinez said she was planning to bring her children to see the tree she and other students decorated, which is located in space 449, across from the Fairmont Hotel.

“I want them to know that there is a lot more than just classes and homework at SJSU,” she said.

Wykoff said many of her classmates plan to go every year and even more plan to trek downtown to see the tree this year.

“Sometimes it seems that people are always so busy that the holidays are less of value, but Christmas in the Park is a reminder that there are still people out there that still value the holidays,” Martinez said.