KGO Radio Interview With Dr. Richard Craig

Dr. Richard Craig

Dr. Richard Craig

Tune into KGO Radio 810 Monday, February 8, at 10 a.m. as Dr. Richard Craig will be interviewed on the Ronn Owen’s show. Live streaming is available at kgoradio.com.

Dr. Craig, professor for the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, will be live on the radio to discuss his new book, Polls, Expectations and Elections: TV News Making in U.S. Presidential Campaigns, and how it relates to the presidential primaries.

Polls, Expectations and Elections - TV News Making in U.S. Presidential Campaigns

Polls, Expectations and Elections – TV News Making in U.S. Presidential Campaigns

Dr. Craig’s book uses a comprehensive content analysis of transcripts of CBS Evening News broadcasts during presidential election campaigns from 1968-2012. The transcripts are used to demonstrate how television news has gone from simply reporting poll data to portraying it as the only motivation for anything candidates do while campaigning.

Copies of the book are available for purchase from amazon.com. To order a review copy for instructional use, click here.

The 2015-16 academic year will serve as Dr. Craig’s 16th here at San José State University. He was recently promoted to full professor in August 2015. Visit ProfCraig.com to learn more about him and his work.

SWEEP Launches Sustainability Phase of Work in Vietnam

SWEEP team members and leaders from the VVTA and USAID come together for a group photo during the convening in Hoi An, Vietnam.

SWEEP team members and leaders from the VVTA and USAID come together for a group photo during the convening in Hoi An, Vietnam.

The Social Work Education Enhancement Project (SWEEP) successfully implemented a third Leadership Academy and on January 6th-8th, in Hoi An, Vietnam. The purpose of the event was to support effective leadership and preparation for collaboration among Rectors and Deans of key universities with social work programs in Vietnam. The leadership training was followed by a convening of 24 leaders across eight SWEEP partner universities as well as leaders from the Vietnam Association of Schools of Social Work and Vietnam Vocational Training Association and Vocational Social Work (VVTA) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the project’s funder. National leaders in social work agreed to form a consortium to continue notable advances in social work that have taken place over three-years of the SWEEP project. Toward the end of the convening, participants commented publicly about how the SWEEP project profoundly impacted progress in the development of social work education in Vietnam and help to launch leaders on a path for ongoing collaboration. SWEEP team members included: Alice Hines, Principal Investigator and Director; Ed Cohen, Co-Principal Investigator; Laurie Drabble, Faculty Expert Leadership Academy; Tuan Tran, Vietnam SWEEP Coordinator, Hoa Nguyen, and Thao Nguyen, Vietnam SWEEP staff.

The 3rd Leadership Academy pose for a group photo during the leadership training in Hoi An, Vietnam.

The 3rd Leadership Academy pause for a group photo during the leadership training in Hoi An, Vietnam.

During the final day of the national convening of leaders in social work education, Tuan Tran received an award from the Vietnam Vocational Training Association and Vocational Social Work. He was lauded for his commitment and tireless work to further the development of social work education in Vietnam.

Tuan Tran receives an award from the Vietnam Vocational Training Association and Vocational Social Work.

Tuan Tran receives an award from the Vietnam Vocational Training Association and Vocational Social Work.

Dr. Edward Mamary Leads Photovoice Project

Dr. Edward Mamary, a Health Science and Recreation professor, was recently a Principal Investigator on a project entitled “Living in an Unfinished America: Shared Experiences of Discrimination and Resilience by Arab, Muslim & Sikh Americans.” Spurred by a series of anti-Arab and anti -Muslim advertisements placed on San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency vehicles (and upheld in other jurisdictions as legal under the First Amendment), the project was sponsored by the City and County of San Francisco Human Rights Commission, with support from the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

The project used a participatory action research methodology called “Photovoice,” to explore the lived experience of those coping with Islamophobia and anti-Arab prejudice. The Arab American, Muslim, and Sikh participants came from a wide range of backgrounds in terms of age, race/ethnicity, religion, and language. Using photography and narrative, participants shared their experiences with prejudice and discrimination. They also revealed how they met these challenges with resilience, cultural pride, and self-determination.

Defending My Son

Using photography and narrative, a Palestinian American women shares her experience with prejudice and discrimination with a picture of her son.

A Palestinian American woman used Photovoice to share her experience with prejudice and discrimination with a picture of her son.

This is my son. His name was Osama. I chose a picture of his school to show with his picture. After 9/11, many people at his school (students, teachers, and staff) tormented him. One teacher in particular continually called him Osama Bin Laden. He had nothing to do with his name and we had nothing to do with what happened on 9/11. They made it like it was his fault. He was 20 years old when he got shot. They said it was mistaken identity, but he got shot because he’s a Middle Easterner, because he had Arabic writing on his car. And they tried to make it seem like he just was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Every time I pass that school, I wish I could see if someone needs help or is being discriminated against. I would want them to know that nothing is wrong with them. I joined this project because of my son. He is not alive to defend himself. I raised my kids to defend themselves. I was raised to stand up for what I believe in and for my religion—how to behave, how to act, how to respect, how to love.

—Fayza, Palestinian American Muslim woman

Tying Turbans

A Sikh American man uses photovoice to describe how he overcame discrimination with the help of his parents and wearing his turban proudly.

A Sikh American man used photovoice to describe how he overcame discrimination with the help of his parents and wearing his turban proudly.

Here is an older Sikh man tying a turban on one of my good friends. This captures a very special moment from our culture, when a Sikh dad or father-like figure ties a turban on his son or daughter. It is like slowly tying valuable cultural ideals into each and every fold of the fabric. It helps the younger generation understand who they are and helps them define their identity. This photo reminded me of the time my dad tied a turban on me as a teen. I didn’t like it, especially because I got called racist slurs at school. After that experience, I went on to eighth grade and cut my hair. I didn’t feel good about myself. My parents would tell me stories of how the Sikh Gurus sacrificed their whole families so Sikhs can wear their turbans like crowns and practice their faith proudly and fearlessly. In eleventh grade, I started growing my hair again and started tying a turban. I feel connected to my roots now and every layer of my turban helps me stand tall in a crowd, proud to be a Sikh.

—Harkanwar, Sikh American man

The photos and narratives were exhibited at public events at the San Francisco City Hall Rotunda in April 2015, and at the Women’s Building in August 2015, providing an opportunity for dialogue with policy members, educators, health care providers, and the community at large.

Poster for the exhibition of photovoice held on August 12, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

Poster for the exhibition of Photovoice held on August 12, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

Community partners on the project included the Asian Law Caucus, the Council on American Islamic Relations, the Arab Cultural and Community Center, the Islamic Network Group, the Sikh Coalition, the San Francisco Department of Public Health, and the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. A second Photovoice project on anti-semitism is underway, with the first exhibit to debut in early spring. Along with Dr. Lynne Andonian, an Occupational Therapy associate professor, Dr. Mamary will be presenting a workshop session on Photovoice at the College of Applied Sciences and Arts’ Center for Applied Research on Human Services (CARHS) Brown Bag event in spring 2016.

Annual Emeritus and Retired Faculty Luncheon Hosted by The College of Applied Sciences and Arts

Dean Mary Schutten welcomes former faculty to the Emeritus and Retired Faculty Luncheon held at Flames Eatery Banquet Room in San José, California.

Dean Mary Schutten welcomes former faculty to the Emeritus and Retired Faculty Luncheon held at Flames Eatery Banquet Room in San José, California.

Dean Mary Schutten of the College of Applied Sciences and Arts (CASA) hosted a luncheon for emeritus and retired faculty on November 20, 2015. The annual event brought together former faculty from CASA’s departments and schools including one former dean, Robert Moore. The luncheon provided an opportunity for college updates from Dean Schutten as well as the college’s department chairs and directors.

Robert Moore, former Dean, congratulates CASA on the wonderful work the college is doing.

Robert Moore, former Dean, congratulates CASA on the wonderful work the college is doing.

Peggy Plato, a Kinesiology professor, guided a tour of the newly renovated Spartan Complex to former faculty prior to lunch. They were able to see new classroom spaces, the gymnastics room and more. The group also toured the new department space for Kinesiology and Health Science and Recreation. Some of the group members visited offices they once worked in and reminisced about their meetings with students. Lee Walton, a former professor of Kinesiology, said he really liked the design of the building and the open space in the lobby for students to use during downtime.

Two students who attended the summer study abroad program led by current CASA faculty were invited to speak about their experience and the impact it has made in their life. Student speakers included Jesse Ruezga, a Master’s student in the School of Social Work and Chelle Tateishi, a Master’s student in Occupational Therapy.

Jesse Ruezga, Master's student in Social Work, talked about studying abroad in Madrid, Spain.

Jesse Ruezga, Master’s student in Social Work, talked about studying abroad in Madrid, Spain.

Chelle Tateishi, a Master's student in Occupational Therapy, spoke about her experience studying abroad in Jyvalska, Finland.

Chelle Tateishi, a Master’s student in Occupational Therapy, spoke about her experience studying abroad in Jyvalska, Finland.

Ruezga spoke about his trip to Spain where he studied the country’s current social justice, human rights and social history with Social Work Professor, Mike Gorman. Tateishi studied the universal health care system on community wellness and prevention in Finland with Occupational Therapy Professor, Lynne Andonian.

The highlight of the luncheon came when former faculty shared a few words about what they have been up to since retirement. Many shared stories of traveling and spending time with grandchildren. Others shared how they are still involved on campus by way of the Emeritus and Retired Faculty Association at San José State University. Emeritus and retired faculty enjoyed catching up with former colleagues and meeting new faces in leadership roles for CASA.

Jill Cody, retired professor from Health Science and Recreation, shared her story of moving near the beach with her husband and writing a book that she plans to finish soon.

Jill Cody, retired professor from Health Science and Recreation, shared her story of moving near the beach with her husband and writing a book that she plans to finish soon.

Daniel Glines, retired Kinesiology professor, shared his story of retirement by staying active outdoors and fishing in Montana.

Daniel Glines, retired Kinesiology professor, shared his story of retirement by staying active outdoors and fishing in Montana.

Former faculty from The Valley Foundation of Nursing and The School of Social Work shared a table with current Social Work Director, Jack Wall and Nursing Director, Kathy Abriam-Yago at the annual luncheon.

Former faculty from The Valley Foundation of Nursing and The School of Social Work shared a table with current Social Work Director, Jack Wall and Nursing Director, Kathy Abriam-Yago at the annual luncheon.

Hospitality Management Students Host Fall 2015 Beers Around the World Trade Show

Hospitality Management students pose for a group picture with their booth representing Mexico.

Hospitality Management students pose for a group picture with their booth representing Mexico.

San José State University (SJSU) students from the department of Hospitality Management (HSPM) hosted a Beers Around the World Trade show at The Glasshouse in downtown San José on November 13. The event was open to SJSU faculty, staff and students along with invited guests over the age of 21. Guests paid $5 for admission and tickets for tasting of beer samples. Additional beverages and food were also available for purchase during the event. All proceeds went to charity.

Students enrolled in HSPM 149, Beer Appreciation and HSPM 140, Meetings and Event Management planned and participated in the trade show. Beer Appreciation students worked in teams to fill the venue with decorated booths representing their assigned brewing region or country with at least two or more beer samples and food pairings for guests to taste. Event Management students planned the event and coordinated guest check in and concessions.

Carly Comer, a Hospitality Management student, worked with a group of fellow students from the HSPM 140 class to seek awards for the winners of the trade show. Comer said the class taught her how to work with companies to get sponsorships and donations.

Carly Comer, far left, and her HSPM group members outreached to several companies for sponsorships and donations for the Beer Tradeshow event.

Carly Comer, far left, and her Meetings and Event Management group members outreached to several companies for sponsorships and donations for the event.

“We reached out to different breweries in San José and Santa Cruz and were able to get prizes and beer donations,” said Comer about obtaining gifts that would be appealing to winners.

Comer’s group were also in charge of recording votes with an iPad in order to nominate beer presenters with the people’s choice award as guests exited the event.

Beer presenters competed with each other for judges’ choice and people’s choice award based on different criteria for each. Judges’ choice awards recognized the booths with the best beer and food pairing and best overall appearance, energy, tasting and knowledge. People’s Choice awards recognized the best apparel, most creative, and people’s favorite.

Students talk with guests about beer from Japan and offered sushi to pair with a variety of beer.

Students talk with guests about beer from Japan and offered sushi to pair with a variety of beer.

Beer Appreciation students representing Canada paired beer with tiramisu, beef summer sausage and salty blue cheese. The group listed specific beers to go best with each type of food.

Beer Appreciation students representing Canada paired beer with tiramisu, beef summer sausage and salty blue cheese. The group listed specific beers to go best with each type of food.

Every group received shot glasses, Redbull drinks, and 4 Wildcide Gordon Biersch Hard Cider.

Ruben Cardenas, a Justice Studies student, took the Beer Appreciation class because he wanted to gain more knowledge of beer. “I love beer, but I wanted to know the process of making it and how to truly appreciate beer rather than just drinking it,” he said.

Cardenas and his fellow students presented a booth representing the state of Washington. The group featured Olympia, Rainier, Red Hook Pumpkin Porter beer and Seattle Cider that was paired with sliced apples, lemon cakes and pizza. Each guest that visited their booth were given a lesson on the history of each beer and how it is made while being served.

“Coming here and taking what we learned in class and to put it in action is what this project really means to me,” Cardenas said. He learned about how the water source in Washington was proven to be natures best to brew beer with and that Seattle is the main brewing hub in the state.

Associate Dean Pam Richardson, left, and Dean Schutten, middle, poses with Ruben Cardenas who represented the state of Washington.

Associate Dean Pam Richardson, left, and Dean Schutten, middle, pose with Ruben Cardenas who represented the state of Washington.

The event wrapped up the night with a break dance performance by members of the King Library Rockers. Guests surrounded the dance floor as each crew member took turns showing off their dance moves.